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The Very Likely Ending Quite Quickly Geocoding Thread

My Geocoding Service(s) of Choice:

  • Texas A&M University

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Pitney Bowes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bing

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Google

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • Map Quest

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • E$ri

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • My cousin Julio has a 'friend' who gets a 'deal' on geocodes that get 'damaged' at the docks.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Another service which I will name in a post shortly.

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • What is this geocoding nonsense?

    Votes: 4 57.1%

  • Total voters
    7
  • Poll closed .

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,941
Points
28
Cyburbia hasn't had a thread about geocoding since 2014. I do a lot of geocoding for various clients and I'm always on the look out for faster, better, and cheaper platforms. So, what geocoding services are you using and why?

I've used the Texas A&M University geocoding services when I had a client that wanted it fast. But, if time is not a consideration I've been using GPS-Visualizer's Bing Maps API. I just load 10,000 addresses and comeback a few hours later. And it's free.

I've used E$RI and they sure are proud of their geocoding $ervices. I've also used the Google and MapQuest API through GPS-Vizualizer. However, to my suprise the Bing geocoding results tend to be more accurate.

Thoughts?
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,154
Points
51
There's also the US Census and Here.

I'd say if Bing works, why change it? Bing Maps is pretty good in general -- a Strretview alternative, Pictometry isometric photos, and the location API. TAMU geocoding is free, and I think it's based on Census data.

FWIW, Bing and Google geocoding located my house perfectly. (We live in a cluster subdivision where three houses share a driveway, and our house is hard to find from the street.)
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
21
There's also the US Census and Here.

I'd say if Bing works, why change it? Bing Maps is pretty good in general -- a Strretview alternative, Pictometry isometric photos, and the location API. TAMU geocoding is free, and I think it's based on Census data.

FWIW, Bing and Google geocoding located my house perfectly. (We live in a cluster subdivision where three houses share a driveway, and our house is hard to find from the street.)
Being a NYer, I have used and loved Pictometry and it still blows my mind that Bing is the company that shares it with the general public. It's the only reason I ever use Bing.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
9,284
Points
28
I'll use different geocoding services based on what data I have. If I have lat/lon information for all the records, I will usually use Google just because of how fast it is and how easy it is to share the results. Of course there are limitations on how you can manipulate the results but I think that's a fair tradeoff for the ease of use.

If I am using street addresses and am going to add the results to an existing projection as part of a bigger process, I will go ahead and use the geocoder in ESRI. Our IT department has given us our own plugin that works really well if we are only geocoding locations within our region, which usually is fine for my needs.

If I am working on something in Excel and decide I want to quickly geocode some locations to see how the data plays out spatially, I will use the "ArcGIS Maps for Office" plugin which links up with our Business Analyst enterprise account and allows me to work with with a lot of different workbooks and then I can save the map to my Business Analyst Online or ArcGIS Online account and do a lot more analysis there if I deem that to be necessary. My one complaint with the ArcGIS Maps for Office is that they don't allow me to find geographies by FIPS Codes so it works really great for point locations but not polygons (at least not at when wanting to look at a huge group of tracts or block groups at once).
 
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