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Time/miles you are willing to travel to work

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,621
Points
29
Saw a recent local posting of a place I would love to work. Commute times on a good day would be close to 90 minutes/85+ miles each way assuming no traffic problems. How far are you willing to travel in miles and/or time to take a new position? Move would be an option but also reasons to stay would probably trump a move. Transit would be an option but necessitate more time 2+ hours and purchase of a junk vehicle to leave at the end of the line. Ever have that feeling where things are just out of reach?
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,422
Points
60
I've done 30 miles/~60 minutes in the beginning of my career (drove across a big part of Chicagoland).

I liked my next commute, which was 0.75 miles/15 mins walking.

I then had ~10 miles/15 mins driving. That wasn't too bad.

Now have 1.5 miles/5 mins driving or 25 mins walking.

I'd prefer no more than 20 miles/30 mins.
 
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dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,562
Points
21
I've done 35-ish miles and 40-60 minutes of commute time earlier in my career. It wasn't great, but certainly was doable, and I've considered having that again.

I have considered a 60 mile, 90-130 minute commute before, which would have been at a good place, with good projects and a former (great) boss I had, but I know that the time spent in a car would be rough.
 

wintergirl

Cyburbian
Messages
35
Points
2
I travel 30 miles (45 minutes) to university, which is a bit of a pain, but where I live is so much cheaper than the city where the university is located and I don't have to do it daily even in "normal" times. My commute is to drive to the edge of the university city and catch a tram, which deposits me right in the middle of campus, super convenient and much easier than trying to drive into the city centre.

The silver lining of the Covid situation has been that I haven't had to do it for a while, which has saved a lot of fuel money and a lot of time. I think going forward, there's going to be a lot less presenteeism and a lot more flexibility in terms of workplace attendance, people travelling 2/3 days a week and working from home the rest of the time.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,383
Points
59
I cut mine down from 42 to 17 and I have never been happier.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,621
Points
29
My longest was 50 miles/1 hour which I did for two years. Closest was a few miles/10 minutes which only lasted for a year while apartment living.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,501
Points
53
About 45-50 minutes. Less lately with so many people working at home and I'm not taking the bus.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,831
Points
46
My longest regular commute was 23 miles, back in 1998 - 99. Looking at that route today, though (had to use Google Maps to figure out the distance), there is no way I would subject myself now to that particular drive on a daily basis. But, back in the late 90s and with going in at the crack of dawn it wasn't a bad drive except for the commute home on Friday afternoons. We were in an apartment back in those days, and we actually started looking for our first house in an area that would have added another five or six miles to that drive...it's funny how the commute wasn't really that much of a factor when we were looking for that first house. Flash forward about 18 years to buying out current house and greatly shortening our respective commutes was a huge factor in deciding on a location...
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,779
Points
46
I did a 42 mile commute (50 minutes in the morning, hour+ in the afternoon). It was not sustainable. It once took me 4 hours to get home during a snow storm. A longer commute might be doable for a limited time but there's no way I would drive that far or farther on a long term basis.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,191
Points
52
My current commute is about 15-20 minutes when I go into the office and I'm not really interested in much longer of a commute these days.

There are a few places in the area that I'd be interested in working at but the money would have to be considerably more than what I currently make to get me to make the move. I was offered a job with a large commercial development firm in downtown Detroit a few years ago and they offered me about $15k than I was making at the time. I thought long and hard about it but decided that wasn't worth the extra 40 minutes in the car every day and dealing with downtown parking and traffic and ultimately passed on the opportunity. The longer commute wasn't the only reason I said no, but it did play a big role.

Maybe post-COVID, remote working will become even more prevalent. I'd be more likely to endure a longer "commute" if it was to an office that I only had to actually go to a few times a month.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,831
Points
46
Maybe post-COVID, remote working will become even more prevalent. I'd be more likely to endure a longer "commute" if it was to an office that I only had to actually go to a few times a month.
My office is still closed, and will remain so until at least mid-April at the earliest. Our office head is certain that even once we are completely past the pandemic number of folks in the office on a given day will never approach what it once was. I have several coworkers who have already moved farther away from the office in anticipation of not ever having to commute to it on a daily basis.
 
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Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,916
Points
73
The longest commute I've ever had averaged about 45 minutes (80% of which were highway miles) and that was only for a couple years. I detested the commute, but in the big scope of things I guess I don't have much to complain about, as all my other commutes have been 25 minutes or less.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,177
Points
57
I did an hour commute for 3 years (in the height of the $4 a gallon gas crisis). It was certainly doable and I drove my wife's car because of gas mileage. I could do it again, but it would have to be more $ and enjoy the job.

I had a commute of 150' from kitchen to desk for a year and that was great.

Other commutes have ranged from 40 mins to 5 mins, and now it's less than 10 mins.
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
1,016
Points
23
I did a 1 hr 45 minute transit commute to a consulting gig a while back and only lasted a year. It started to wreck my health - it gave me sciatica from all of the siting and zero time for exercise of self-care. My last gig had a 1hr transit commute each way and even that eventually grew to be too much. I will say that a long transit commute beats the hell out of a long car commute. Both are toxic long-term.

It'd be nice if back-wrecking, soul-crushing daily supercommutes could be left as a relic of the Before Times, don't you think?
 

HomerJ

Cyburbian
Messages
1,144
Points
18
My longest was 60 minutes / 25 miles and I still loved the job despite hating the commute. Right now mine is 5-6 miles and 10/15 minutes driving or 30 minutes on transit. It's not too bad but I was spoiled from the last couple of jobs having a 1 mile commute and getting to walk or bike every day.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,916
Points
73
It'd be nice if back-wrecking, soul-crushing daily supercommutes could be left as a relic of the Before Times, don't you think?
I wouldn't be surprised if we see a significant increase in work from home policies for many employers. One advantage to the pandemic has been that companies have found out in some situations the cost of maintaining an office isn't worth it.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,260
Points
35
Current commute is 25 min (can be around 30 in bad weather) and I pay the toll for the privilege of a short(er) commute. Without the toll, I would have to travel 2 freeways - both with ongoing construction - and more than double the time.

The worst regular commute I've had so far was minimum 45 minutes, assuming all the traffic gods were smiling. I had to drive through downtown to the south side, and had limited options on the route. Most days it was at least an hour from garage to parking lot, usually more to get home. One day it was 3+ hours due to a fatal truck collision at the highway split, along with a professional home team game and rain. No transit available. I did the commuter bus option in one place - I was willing to sit on the bus for 1 hour rather than drive. Was a pain in bad weather, though.

Now I look at the commute options. If driving, my maximum time is 30 minutes, prefer less. Using transit, I'm willing to have a longer commute if it's overall convenient. Cost of the commute is also part of the equation.
 
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WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,191
Points
52
I wouldn't be surprised if we see a significant increase in work from home policies for many employers. One advantage to the pandemic has been that companies have found out in some situations the cost of maintaining an office isn't worth it.

I imagine this will be very true in the corporate world. I worry that it won't be so much of a thing in the public sector though. Hopefully public employers can get past the stigma of letting civil servants work from home as it seems like there was always a hesitancy to allowing it since we are being paid by public dollars so we should be there for the public 8-5 (or whatever). Hopefully this proves that a lot of the administrative, policy, and other non-public facing tasks are just as easily accomplished remotely as they are in an office.
 

nrschmid

Cyburbian
Messages
2,886
Points
22
Job #1. 1.25 mile commute, 15 minute walk.
Job #2. 15 minute commute.
Job #3. 30 minute commute.
Job #4. 45 minute commute, then moved closer to work, 10 minute commute.
Job #5. 20 minute commute.
Job #6 (current).15 minute commute by tollway, 25 minute commute by parallel surface road. There is an MBA program with a remote campus half a block from my job. The other MBA program on this side of town is a short train ride from my apartment (and both can do in-person or entirely online classes).
 

MacheteJames

Cyburbian
Messages
1,016
Points
23
I imagine this will be very true in the corporate world. I worry that it won't be so much of a thing in the public sector though. Hopefully public employers can get past the stigma of letting civil servants work from home as it seems like there was always a hesitancy to allowing it since we are being paid by public dollars so we should be there for the public 8-5 (or whatever). Hopefully this proves that a lot of the administrative, policy, and other non-public facing tasks are just as easily accomplished remotely as they are in an office.

I share your doubt over the willingness of public sectors employers to be progressive on remote work policy, post-COVID, for fear of negative taxpayer perceptions and the need for customer service/face time. I also think that such beliefs will cost public sector employers in talent retention if they're wedded too them too closely. Some of the best folks in the field will want these policies and will consider them part of their benefits package, and they'll get it at a consulting firm if a local government office won't give it to them.
 

P_Johnson76

Cyburbian
Messages
259
Points
11
My current is 5 minutes each way.

Thinking of relocating and buying a house within 15 minutes if the office. Once you have a 5 minute commute and can come home for lunch you realize anything more just sucks.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,244
Points
71
The longest commute I had was a 35-40 minute contraflow drive (about 25 miles / 40 km) when I was working in northeast Ohio. (My office was in a far outer ring industrial satellite town, and I lived in an inner ring suburb.) I think that's about the farthest I'd push it behind the wheel, although I'd consider something longer if a one seat transit ride was an option.

My current commute is about a 10 minute drive; 4.5 miles / 7 km, 550' / 165 m downhill, all two-lane surface streets. It's almost a straight shot from home to work: pull out of the driveway, take a right, drive to the end of the street, take a left down a state road, keep going, and then right into the parking lot at work. I could do a one-seat bus ride, but I often have to do errands on the way home.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,934
Points
44
21 minutes from door to door. My shortest commute was 5 minutes from my door, up an alley into the courthouse and into my office.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,935
Points
39
45-50 minute transit or cycle commute would be my max. Not interested in any job I'd have to commute to by car.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,449
Points
35
I've pulled a 1-hr each direction commute before for about two years, and won't do that again.

My current commute is 10 minutes each way, about 4 miles by car. Cycling is about 20 minutes and 3 miles using a few off-system shortcuts.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,820
Points
47
When I was a young buck and deeply in love, I did an hour commute each way. I would never, ever do that again.
My shortest was a six minute walk over 5-1/2 blocks.
Current is just a smidge under 2 miles/5 minutes/6 traffic signals/three turns.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,607
Points
70
AIB Gedunker
in my 2 1/2 miles commute I have
3 turns
2 stop sign and
7 stop lights.
 
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