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Enforcement Tire pile so big you can see it from space

Howl

Cyburbian
Messages
223
Points
9
There was a tire fire in Wales that burned for 15 years, but that was an oddity. Usually they only burn and release their toxic smoke and runoff for less than a year.
 

Blide

Cyburbian
Messages
1,186
Points
18
Totally not surprised that was South Carolina... See stuff like that too frequently around here.

Some guy around here was found dumping thousands of tires into a creek for a number of years. If I recall, no one ever managed to get a hold of the owner so the county had to foot the bill for the cleanup.
 

beach_bum

Cyburbian
Messages
3,427
Points
21
Wow, I mean that's a lot of tires. What a terrible thing the violator is doing to the environment.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,576
Points
22
Let's talk enforcement. Does anyone have an ordinance example for used/junk tires that actually works? The tires just keep showing up everywhere and I'd love to propose a code that has proven effective in other communities.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,690
Points
57
I don't think there is a solution now, except something that would be on a statewide or national level -- have a disposal fee as part of the tire price, and drop-off points where the operators are reimbursed, kind of like can and bottle deposits. Mark the tires eligible for "deposits" when they're sold.

In New York, the state and local DOTs don't use crumb rubber in paving, so there's less demand for tires for recycling.

Local solutions? I don't know. Maybe if a community uses old tires for bumpers at docks, locally made crash barriers, or some other application where they need something cheap and moderately bouncy?
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
10,578
Points
33
My state charge a little extra for tires. The money goes toward tire clean ups. It's also available to local governments. My jurisdiction has a Saturday drop off program where we take everything that isn't hazardous. We also have a household hazardous waste drop off day once a year. We contract with a tire recycling company that drops of a semi trailer. Once it's full, they swap it out with an empty one. Even with all this, we still have a tire dumping problem. It's just not as bad as it could be. Bottom line, you can't change bad habits and the human heart.
 
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