• It's easy to sign up and post! Register with a working email address (we won't give it to others, or spam you), or through Facebook, Twitter, or a Microsoft ID. Google and LinkedIn coming soon. 🙂

To change your cell phone number or to not change your cell phone number... that is the question

Messages
18,885
Likes
4
Points
34
#1
Moving allows people the option to change their cell phone number if they so choose. I am on the fence about it and my wife said that she wants to keep her number.

What are the benefits to changing your phone number to a "local" number after you move?
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Moderator
Messages
11,238
Likes
7
Points
27
#2
With the prevalence of cell phones over land lines and one-touch calling (press your intended's name on smartphone), it's really unnecessary to change the number.

I have a friend in metro Chicago that still has an Atlanta, GA number when she lived/worked there about 10+ years ago.

My wife and I still have Chicago numbers despite having been in OH for the last ~5 years.
 

dvdneal

Cyburbian
Messages
12,754
Likes
23
Points
27
#4
Change it so you get a new caller ID. That way all the people who wouldn't answer your calls will answer them now. Won't that be fun!
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,434
Likes
0
Points
0
#5
Change it so you get a new caller ID. That way all the people who wouldn't answer your calls will answer them now. Won't that be fun!
I generally don't answer calls from unknown numbers. Especially if its an out of town area code.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
5,653
Likes
0
Points
21
#6
My daughter lives in NC and still has her home area code. She usedt a temporary phone with NC area code and decided to keep the PA phone number.
 
Messages
5,374
Likes
1
Points
21
#7
I didn't change mine when I moved, and neither did hubby. Granted, we're still in the same state, so most locals know that the call is at least in-state, but we didn't see any reason to get a land line and new numbers.
 

Raf

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,267
Likes
17
Points
22
#8
My wife and I changed our numbers about a year after we moved here. I had my cell phone number for almost 10 years by that time, she was running on 5 plus with hers. We decided to change to feel more connected to the community, plus our area code has a nice ring to it being all high and mighty in the 805.
 
Messages
9,917
Likes
7
Points
25
#9
I changed to a local number when I switched companies. Sprint is about as effective as smoke signals here. When the phone I had with them died, I got a new phone with a new company and a new number.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,239
Likes
5
Points
27
#10
If you've had the number a long time, keep it. Since long distance calling has gone the way of the dodo bird, it doesn't matter much anymore. If you get assigned a work phone, you can use that as your local number.
 
Messages
9,052
Likes
11
Points
25
#11
If you've had the number a long time, keep it. Since long distance calling has gone the way of the dodo bird, it doesn't matter much anymore. If you get assigned a work phone, you can use that as your local number.
This.

I've found that that is the one good use of my work cell phone... which I was required to get precisely because I refused to change my personal cell phone number to a "248" area code instead of my "586" number that I've had for about 15 years. Working for a local government that uses the area code in a bit of their marketing, I can sort of see their side of the argument though.

Being in a major metro though, I have friends in the area with 5 different U.S. area codes and 2 Canadian area codes.

Even when I lived in NC I used a Michigan "586" area code instead of the local "910". With all of the military in North Carolina and all of the Yankees and out-of-staters who have moved to the RTP over the past couple of decades, I don't think anybody would bat an eye at an out of area area code. I would have to imagine that there are certain areas in NC that have a really high concentration of foreign area codes, relative to the overall population.
 
Messages
18,885
Likes
4
Points
34
#12
This.

I've found that that is the one good use of my work cell phone... which I was required to get precisely because I refused to change my personal cell phone number to a "248" area code instead of my "586" number that I've had for about 15 years. Working for a local government that uses the area code in a bit of their marketing, I can sort of see their side of the argument though.

Being in a major metro though, I have friends in the area with 5 different U.S. area codes and 2 Canadian area codes.

Even when I lived in NC I used a Michigan "586" area code instead of the local "910". With all of the military in North Carolina and all of the Yankees and out-of-staters who have moved to the RTP over the past couple of decades, I don't think anybody would bat an eye at an out of area area code. I would have to imagine that there are certain areas in NC that have a really high concentration of foreign area codes, relative to the overall population.
I have had this number for about 10 years now and I kept going over the pros and cons of changing but I could not come up with a good reason to change it beyond having a 'local' number. It would seem the idea of a local number does not justify the hassle of letting everyone know that I changed it.

One thing that we might do is set up a new Google Voice number that is local. There are now VoIP boxes that you can program to use Google Voice and you plug a regular phone into. Google Voice is free and the VoIP box is about $25. So it would seem to be a win/win and give a us a home phone that can also forward to my cell phone.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,286
Likes
0
Points
9
#13
Funny thing about cell numbers. After we moved from MI to KY, I changed my cell number but Her Highness didn't. Later, I moved back to MI. That means that she's in KY with a MI number and I'm in MI with a KY number.

I don't worry about it much, but I do make sure that I give my area code every time I give out my number.
 

Rygor

Cyburbian
Messages
2,715
Likes
0
Points
0
#15
I still have my Chicago area number even though I've lived in two different states since I was in IL. I've had it for almost 15 years so it seems like it would be more of a hassle to change it and have to let everyone I know what my new number is. On the plus side, maybe I'd get fewer spam calls for a while.
 
Messages
3,721
Likes
0
Points
19
#16
I have had this number for about 10 years now and I kept going over the pros and cons of changing but I could not come up with a good reason to change it beyond having a 'local' number. It would seem the idea of a local number does not justify the hassle of letting everyone know that I changed it.

One thing that we might do is set up a new Google Voice number that is local. There are now VoIP boxes that you can program to use Google Voice and you plug a regular phone into. Google Voice is free and the VoIP box is about $25. So it would seem to be a win/win and give a us a home phone that can also forward to my cell phone.
No need to change it. I still have a DC number and I have not lived there for almost 8 years. I did the Google Voice thing for a while but it did not seem to matter so I dropped it. My work phone is the local exchange so if someone needs a local number I use it. There is no reason to make the switch unless you feel the need or desire to have one...which if you do is enough reason to switch.
 

Masswich

Cyburbian
Messages
1,303
Likes
1
Points
17
#17
I kept my number. The only downside (other than the occasional comment that I am a carpetbagger Masshole) is that this area doesn't use area codes in normal dialing so folks have to take an extra effort to call me (and visa versa) until we are on speed dial with each other


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ursus

Cyburbian
Messages
4,892
Likes
0
Points
0
#18
I have no doubt that my children with their phones will never have another phone number, no matter where they go, and I don't think any of them will ever have a land line number that's not at an office they're working.

After my dad died last year, my 73 year old mother was free to ditch the land line - and have the number they'd used for that line for 43 years assigned to her cell phone account.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,286
Likes
1
Points
0
#19
Yeah.....

....... plus our area code has a nice ring to it being all high and mighty in the 805.
:facepalm:

Well, I'm in the mighty 666:6:.......ah er.....I mean the 661 and I still use my Arizona 928 cell phone......:D
 
Top