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Home stuff 🏡 To Pool or Not to Pool

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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To pool or not to pool? That is the question. Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the sweat and discomfort of outrageous hot weather, not to mention decreased maintenance costs and lower insurance, Or to undertake construction of a pool into one's yard and, by cooling off, end it (while doling out shekels to make it happen)?
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In some places, backyard pools seem obligatory, while in others, the climate and proximity to water sources makes them less necessary. What is your take on back yard swimming pools? Is the convenience worth the expense and effort in your view?
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
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3,058
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49
Most real estate agents don't even factor in a pool when they do a comparative market analysis. For as many people who want one there are just as many who don't so it's a wash. So as long as you don't go into it thinking about adding value to your home I say go for it. I mean, it's your house and if you plan to be there a while make it like you want.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,422
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It's typically impossible to build sand castles at a pool, so I'd rather save the money for summer stays at a beachfront/beach-near house.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,814
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57
Yes.













To go into more detail, average temp in June, July, and August is pushing 90 degrees and humidity is crazy. We get 90 degree days starting in April and running into October. Yes, we have a neighborhood pool that is open Memorial Day to Labor Day, but hours are limited, it hits capacity on weekends, and the lifeguard makes everyone get out of the pool the last ten minutes of the hour. When we have out of town visitors, we have to pay extra for passes for them to swim.

Sure there is maintenance required. But everything requires maintenance. We are looking at a fiberglass pool with a DE cartridge filter because it is super clean and appears to be the least maintenance if you keep up with it.

Finally, given the situation with our household, a pool would be therapeutic and we would also be looking to get a heater to extend the season to almost year round use (No Dec or Jan).

As for sandcastles... sure you can. Just put a sandbox near the pool and call it good.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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As for sandcastles... sure you can. Just put a sandbox near the pool and call it good.
Then...sand goes directly in the pool and the pump/filter/whole thing dies.

How would you feel about that...dad?

;)
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,562
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21
I live in the land of southern California, where it's summer most months of the year, so we're getting a pool. For the few colder times of the year, the heated spa will suffice.

We know that the pool does not increase the value of the house, but the additional hardscape and yard improvements will certain improve the livability compared to what it was before.
 

The Terminator

Cyburbian
Messages
1,736
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25
In Québec, you could get everything you would want for Pool building from CLUB PISCINE, the official magasin d'été pour les québécois. This as is from the early 00s.


Because zoning in the province often limits in ground pool construction, but moreso because you can only get two-three months of use out of your pool, Club Piscine sells allot of above ground pools.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
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3,778
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46
My parents had pools when I was a kid. It was nice but even as a kid I could see what a hassle they were. I've never had a desire to have a pool.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,191
Points
52
An older woman bought and renovated a house two houses down from ours a few years ago. She did a massive renovation and addition and also put in a HUGE pool. She always opens it very early in the year and closes it very late. I was up on the roof Monday or Tuesday of last week cleaning the gutters and since there are barely any leaves on the trees yet, I could see into her yard pretty easily and of course her pool was open already. I can only imagine how much she spends to heat the pool all spring...
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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I remember reading somewhere that Cheektowaga, New York has the nation's highest percentage of houses wih above-ground pools. I can't find a cite for it, though.




Supposedly, Montreal has the highest percentage of houses with pools of any metropolitan area in North America. Go figure.

There was an inground pool in the backyard of the house I had in Florida. I though it was easier to maintain than a lawn.

Where I live now, pools of any kind are relatively uncommon, even in well-off neighborhoods. I don't know if it's the soil (thick clay with little or no organic matter), topography (hilly in some areas), or the culture. Backyard pools are a lot more common in the blue collar "town next door", but nowhere near Buffalo or Montreal levels.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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11,191
Points
52
When I was on a zoom meeting yesterday the topic of pools came up while we were waiting for the final few people to join.

An older guy (late-60s?) was sitting in his "pool room" and somebody commented on how it must be nice to have an indoor pool. He said when he and his wife bought the house years ago they weren't specifically looking for a pool but the house already had one and they liked everything else about the house so they bought it. After a couple of years of using the pool sparingly, it needed a good bit of work so they were left with the decision of sinking $10k+ into just to keep it functioning or spend that much or more to fill it in and re-landscape the yard. His preference was to fill it in and be done with it but his wife wanted to keep it and said she'd use it a lot more. He agreed but decided to go all out and actually build a room around it so they can use it most of the year. His wife ended up swimming nearly everyday for years and years (except in December and January when it would just get too cold and too hard to heat) up until she died a couple years ago and now it goes mostly unused again.

Another woman on the call recounted her story of the "free" pool the acquired a couple years ago: Family friends of theirs had bought a new pricey above ground pool but after a couple years, their kids were older and not using it and the parents were tired of maintaining it so they offered it free to my coworker. She and her husband agreed and planned to disassemble it early the following spring and take it to their house. Late in March a couple years ago the pool-owner got tired of seeing it in his backyard so he took it down one day and called my coworker and told them, "Come get it or it's going to the curb". They brought it back to their house but now the husband, who is generally pretty handy, hadn't disassembled it so was getting confused as to how it went back together so they ended up having to pay somebody to come put it together for them. $ The professionals arrive and won't put the pool together without leveling the yard properly first $$ and then they have to pay to get water trucked in to fill it $$$. Everything goes great that first summer and then one day the next spring after filling the pool again $$$$ my coworker comes home to a notice on the door that the pool is 8" over a utility easement and they need to take it down or move it. They elect to move it so they need to have the professionals out again. $$$$$ Afterwards, they figure now it's finally in a "good" spot so they may as well sink a bunch more money into a big deck and some improved landscaping. $$$$$

She said, all-in, their "free" pool probably cost them close to $25k, not including chemicals and time to clean it and typical maintenance.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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I'm not a good swimmer and therefore a pool doesn't give me much 'value'.

I prefer waterparks with cool rides/features or going to beaches and surface bodies.
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,562
Points
21
I've been redoing my front yard (it was way too woody and overgrown from the prior owner, and was also beat up from digging the pool) that after each day working on the rehab, I've wished I could jump in a finished pool. We're already in the high 70s this week, and will be about 90 degrees this weekend, so it would be nice to have the cool-off swim.

TOFB - your pool looks nice!
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,438
Points
30
As long as our neighborhood pool (HOA) stays open, then I'm good. Instead of trying to set up a reservation system so it didn't get busy last summer, the HOA just closed it due to COVID.

I guess I can't imagine making or having enough money to afford a house with a backyard big enough for an inground pool here, so it's not even near my radar, let alone on it. :rofl:
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
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2,958
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39
I'll post another picture in 3-4 weeks when it is cleaned up and the flowers are blooming.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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11,191
Points
52
As long as our neighborhood pool (HOA) stays open, then I'm good. Instead of trying to set up a reservation system so it didn't get busy last summer, the HOA just closed it due to COVID.

I guess I can't imagine making or having enough money to afford a house with a backyard big enough for an inground pool here, so it's not even near my radar, let alone on it. :rofl:

Re: neighborhood pools - Our neighborhood doesn't have one (that seems pretty rare here in Metro Detroit) but there is a parcel of a few acres owned by the county water department. It has a very nice brick and wrought iron fence and a well maintained brick and stone building that surrounds a pumphouse or something. There is an earthen berm across the front of the property and it's very nicely landscaped, similar to a local racquet club around the corner, so all you can see from the road is a nice looking building and a small parking area. We'd drive or walk past and my oldest would ask what the property was so one hot day I told her it was a neighborhood pool but I didn't like going so I never took her. A week later she was begging her mom to take her to the pool. My wife had no idea what she was talking about at first until I explained it and then she promptly ruined the joke.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,958
Points
39
Heard about the chlorine shortage yesterday and upon checking today, the product is indeed n short supply and crazy expensive. Most sources online were out. I managed to get 25 pounds for $130.00 at the nearby pool store. Usually I pay about $110.00 for 50 pounds.

I have about 70 pounds on hand and go through about 35-40 pounds in a season so I guess I'm good for a while.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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20,814
Points
57
We are still in the market for a pool, but our timeline is now extended out a bit due to some market conditions and supply shortages. However our determination to get one has only increased due to some drama that has occurred with our neighborhood pool. Apparently, last October, someone who lives in the neighborhood signed a contact to rent out a room in the community center and a pavilion overlooking the pond for a wedding. In the contract it notes that the pool will be closed. (Part of the area for the reception is right next to the pool.)

However, the HOA decided that the pool will be opening sooner than expected (but consistent with past years) and it has caused a massive fracture in the neighborhood. The HOA agreed to close the pool at 3pm to not interfere with the 5pm wedding, but the comments on the Facebook page are crazy. Half the neighborhood is outraged that the HOA is closing the pool due to a private party that is outside of the pool area, the other side was outraged that they were going to open the pool that day if there was a wedding scheduled. Personally, if the weather is nice we will be at the pool early in the day and leave before it gets too busy.
 
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