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Too Restrictive on Signage?

Messages
37
Points
2
The City of Aspen has come under a lot of fire from Businesses that their sign regulations are too restrictive and do not allow businesses to be creative and/or promote their businesses effectively. I have found that in some of the shopping corridors in downtown some signs promoting businesses are illegible within 100 feet of their business, while other signs of the same size have different designs that are recognizable from a couple blocks away. This may seem contradictory but I feel one reason that some businesses are hurt by the regulations is by poor design of their sign, not by the restrictions the city has placed on their signage. Going back to the example of sign visibility, their is a North Face Store in town that has an exterior sign that is visible from a few blocks away, but I feel the reason for this is the familiarly of the logo and due to their simple design they are able to be more visible on a smaller sign (see pictures posted under my personal photos http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/). Has anyone worked with this issue and seen some of the same issues and contradictories as I have? On one hand I feel that the city may be able to relax some of their restrictions to allow for some more creative signage that would make business more visible, however, after looking at other similar tourist cities regulations, ours are not as restrictive as the businesses lead us to believe. I have a table of our commercial signage regulations attached to this post.
 

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ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
I suppose it depends on whether or not you consider those auto or pedestrian oriented. IMHO, they seem a little small for auto oriented signage.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,704
Points
69
10 square feet is really small for a freestanding sign in an automobile-oriented business district. 36 square feet and a maximum 5' or 6' height seems to be the standard for traffic-visible freestanding signs in most strict sign codes I've encountered.

There used to be a planner from Vail who frequented these boards. Maybe he'll check in for this message, offer up their regulations, and the justification for the numbers.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
I agree with Dan....it's small for auto oriented.

Our signage regs in our Performance Overlay District caught flak from some because they thought it to be too small:

Freestanding 10 foot height max.
Size: 30 square feet for 1-2 tennants
50 square feet for 3+ tennants
 
Messages
37
Points
2
It is primarily a pedestrian oriented town. There are several streets that traverse through parts of the commercial core but due to the amount of pedestrian traffic and amount of vehicles parked along the street one would be hard pressed to go more then 20-25 mph. Plus there are a lot of people on bikes. I still beleive an increase in overall sign area should be considered.
 
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