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Transportation Train derails, catches fire, bridge collapses -- who gets the blame? (Tempe AZ)

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2,359
Points
20
News Today--7/29/2020:

Train derails in Tempe, Arizona, causing fire and partial bridge collapse

Train derailment, massive fire on bridge over Arizona lake



  • Who gets the blame? ie. Which agencies or companies are to blame?
  • How to reduce the chances of something like this happening again?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
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14,808
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51
I'm not sure who's responsible for what on that bridge. I'm assuming the rail lines, train and all that is Union Pacific's problem. I don't know if Tempe has any ownership in the bridge.

I didn't notice any smoke in my 7am commute, but I wasn't paying and I'm only facing that directions for a minute. My coworker got to see lots of smoke coming from that side of town, but he didn't pass the bridge.

That bridge is ancient. At least in Arizona terms. I remember it getting washed out in a flood back in the 80'. I'm sure they'll just fix it up again because I believe it's part of the UP intercontinental line.
 

estromberg

Cyburbian
Messages
230
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9
I'm not sure who's responsible for what on that bridge. I'm assuming the rail lines, train and all that is Union Pacific's problem. I don't know if Tempe has any ownership in the bridge.
As a bridge solely for trains, I'd be very surprised if there was any ownership in the bridge other than UP. Railroads are notoriously possessive of their ROW. They will likely seek public funds to repair or replace it and will probably get them.
 
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2,359
Points
20
You know the expression,
"You can't make this stuff up!"
"Weeks before train derailment on Tempe bridge, there was another on the same bridge"
Article Snippets:
"Around 4 p.m. on June 26 [2020], a Union Pacific train derailed about 12 cars on the Tempe Town Lake Bridge. The rail line was reopened on the early morning of June 28. . . .
Union Pacific did not say whether the June 26 incident had any connection to [last] Wednesday's fire."

"[Tempe Resident Elizabeth Deitchman] recalled when she went on a walk a month ago, on June 27, and witnessed a closure of the roads and walkways that piqued her interest. Deitchman approached an officer to ask what was going on, pulling out her cell phone to record the interaction. In the video recording, she asked an officer what had happened. He responded 'Yeah, they're working on the bridge, so they're removing railroad spikes and big logs and stuff like that and a lot of it's falling through presenting a safety hazard for anyone walking through while they're trying to work on it.' The officer then confirmed that a train had derailed the night before."
" 'I'm just curious why no one knows it derailed,' Deitchman said to the officer. . . .The officer shrugged and responded 'It's not really a big news story I guess.' "

"Train incident on June 27, 2020, at Tempe Town Lake": Photos
 

landy

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
  • How to reduce the chances of something like this happening again?

More government inspections and heftier fines for failures to correct violations. Heck, start issuing fines for not ensuring that a bridge was inspected by FRA if there is a derailment/accident. The issue is that inspections take time and money. The last paragraph below specifically references aging bridges and the need for better inspection methods.

 
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