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Uncle Sam Wants Your Kid

Messages
3,690
Points
27
Ok, despite my aforementioned leftist/libertarian leanings, I don't have any problems with this.

I'm curious to see what you all have to say about it.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
33
Nobiggie, they can get the names elsewhere

My 'ex' works in database managment for direct mail. You want a list? Pennies per thousand!

Next time you get a catalog in the mail look for the numeric code near your name. That code tells them everything about your demographic profile, buying habits, etc...
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
38
I have a problem with any entity being given lists of minors. One of our central Florida county school boards is taking a beating because they've been giving lists of all public-school students (even the litlest ones) to any company that wants the info. Most local governments won't give out the same level of personal information about high-risk employees such as law enforcement officers and firefighters, so why make lists of children available?
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Re: Nobiggie, they can get the names elsewhere

bturk said:

Next time you get a catalog in the mail look for the numeric code near your name. That code tells them everything about your demographic profile, buying habits, etc...
Where can I find out what my code means :)
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
5,801
Points
29
Names and info are easy to get. Things come in the mail, addressed to my 7th grade daughter - beauty pageant info, college scholarship info, private school info. Someone, somewhere, is sharing her info.

If the schools can share info with schools and businesses, I don't have a problem sharing it with the military. Just because they contact someone doesn't mean that someone must enlist.

I hope that the opt out forms take the students' names off of all the potential contacts.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
But will they have to follow the same rules as other telemarketers? Will they only accept a "don't call again" from the minor or is anyone okay to request that?
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
This made the front page of one of Madison's papers. Here, the school district had a policy not to give away the information and to restrict recruiters to one day per semester in the schools. At the same time, it shares its databases and gives regular access to the schools to college recruiters and businesses. The point to be taken here is that the US military should be given the same access given to to anyone else. To do otherwise is an infringement upon the military's rights.

What is wrong with these parents/school boards that they think they should impose their views on others? The military has been an excellent - and sometimes the only way for many kids to achieve something in life, whether by gaining a skill, earning the GI Bill, or having a career in the service.

Maybe we should consider a year or two of mandatory service for everyone.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,985
Points
29
My take.

I'd like to see the recruiter come and get all the kids that got a D or below that semester and take them out for a little roadwork and fighting position construction. They would bring them back before the beginning of next semester. 5 to 10 days should do it. Let them spend Christmas eve in hole they dug themselves. Then the kids would either have a new attitude or a future career as an 11 Bush.

I have a friend that was the Army's director of recruiting in Madison in the late 80's. He'd like to see involuntary conscription forced upon the good people of Madison. I have never seen a man carry a grudge like he has for Madison.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
I have no problem with the military being given student names and recruiting on campus. As a matter of fact, I do have a big problem with it not being allowed. It still chaps my behind that some schools kicked ROTC off campus during the Vietnam era.

Not only is the military providing a vital service to our country and way of life, but it also provides great employment, experience, and educational opportunities to its members.

In my case I spent almost five years exposed to very different cultures, learning skills, and gaining experience that would have been harder to come by outside of the military. Beyond this, based on military service and now veteran status I have had a bachelors and masters degree paid for, and a PhD if I decide to go for it.

What type of fool would deny these opportunities to their students/children???
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
E.G. - Madison is not the only place where schools had limited access to students. Portland and several other cities had similar measures. Madison is a great place, and progressive in many positive ways, but sometimes loses sight of reality. Earlier this year we had the national anthem issue (school board would not allow the Pledge because of the 'under god' phrase, and would only allow instrumental versions of the national anthem because the words were too war-like) and more recently a proposed ban on idling vehicles for longer than five minutes. But the city has plenty of good, normal people who simply shake their heads at all this and send their kids to private schools.

Runner - Will the GI bill pay for doctoral studies now? I remember as an undergrad College Republican, countermarching on the John Lennon Society as they protested the "Military-Industrial Complex" on campus. The ROTC office and the business school were located across from each other. Hey, hey, ho, ho!
JLS has got to go!
Ah, yes, I was another campus radical. How I miss Reagan and the good ol' days.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Michael Stumpf said:
Runner - Will the GI bill pay for doctoral studies now?
Having been an NROTC (Marine Option) scholarship recipient I was not eligible for the GI Bill or VEAP. I don't now what the GI Bill covers, seems to me that my dad used the old GI Bill for his masters. However, the Hazelwood Act for Texas veterans covers 130 credit hours at any state (Texas) university. Since I already had the BS the 130 covers post graduate studies :)
 
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Messages
3,690
Points
27
I really can't see what all the brou ha ha is over. If other potential employers and colleges are given the access, i really think it is insane that our nation's military can't have it.

I'm with Michael. I think we need mandatory service in the States. 2 years military or 3 years doing non-military service. And no exemptions for rich or politician's kids.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Runner said:


Having been an NROTC (Marine Option) scholarship recipient I was not eligible for the GI Bill or VEAP. I don't now what the GI Bill covers, seems to me that my dad used the old GI Bill for his masters. However, the Hazelwood Act for Texas veterans covers 130 credit hours at any state (Texas) university. Since I already had the BS the 130 covers post graduate studies :)
I think now you pay your $1,200 and get X amount back to use on whatever. I wouldn't know though, I'm the dumb one who went into the military AFTER college.
 
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