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Uniquely Canadian expressions

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,896
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27
I purchased a Canadian publication, Cottage Life, when I was in Nova Scotia (excellent magazine, by the way).

Twice I came across an expression that I'd never seen or heard before - and it wasn't even in quotes, so it must be fairly common: "tickety-boo."

What does it mean??

And any other uniquely Canadian expressions or slang that you Canadian Cyburbanites would like to share?
 

jmf

Cyburbian
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594
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17
I would take to mean things are going as planned, smoothly, everything is in its place.

I wouldn't have said that it is a common use in Canada now. This website gives a bit of a background http://www.quinion.com/words/qa/qa-tic1.htm.

I think Canada's close connections with England, Scotland, Wlaes and Ireland, among many others have given us some phrases you wouldn't expect to hear on this side of the pond. Remember that a lot of women came to Canada in the 1940s (so the yougest of these would only be in their 70s now) as war brides so that fairly recent influx has influenced things a bit.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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30
Here are some words in common usage from my area

Greeting - "How she going?" Pronounced "Howshegoin?

The reply is always "the very best"

We have "door yards" area where you park, mostly rural.

We watch for freshette (sp?) - spring breakup of the ice.

"Those smelt from the Baie are some good, you know?"

I have a long list of x rated ones too. Dealing with french contractors can be funny.

And don't forget "clube"
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
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30
Canadians seem to have multiple phrases for "go for it".

Such as "fill yer boots" (Maritime) or "Give 'er" (rest of country). I don't know how to spell give 'er. Maybe it's just one word.

Give 'er can also mean other things... like if you are working really hard at something, driving fast, etc... you'd be givin'er. It's my favorite expression up here.

Other words/phrases I like:

keener (a suck up/teachers pet type of person)
bootin' around (kind of like toolin' around)
molson muscle (beer belly)
 

jmf

Cyburbian
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594
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17
nerudite said:
Canadians seem to have multiple phrases for "go for it".

Such as "fill yer boots" (Maritime) or "Give 'er" (rest of country). I don't know how to spell give 'er. Maybe it's just one word.
As a Maritimer, I would say that 'fill your boots' is used more in situations where you really don't care one way or another.

In Newfoundland the catch-all phrase usually includes 'on the go' - "are you getting on the go" (are you having a good time, are you ready, are you getting drunk...). There is a whole dicitionary of Newfoundland English so I won't start on other phrases.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
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30
jmf said:
As a Maritimer, I would say that 'fill your boots' is used more in situations where you really don't care one way or another.
Yeah, I guess the equivalent would be "go for it" in the States.

"Hey can I have the last donut?"

"Fill your boots"
 
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