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School: University of California Berkeley (Cal) 🇺🇸 University of California - Berkeley (Cal) thread

JoleCole

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Hi jveverka81,

Thank you for your response. I was also at the UCLA's Open House! Did you go to the transportation workshop with Brian Taylor? Maybe we were sitting next to each other...lol...I definitely agree with you about the vibes you got from UCLA - unity and enthusiasm! Unfortunately, I feel UCLA is a little weak in environmental planning and sustainability emphasis. Since I went to UCLA for undergrad, I also took some of the Environmental Analysis and Policy elective courses and didn't see much variety in that concentration. I'm interested in the practical side of planning (physical design, landuse planning, and environmental planning), so I picked Berkeley after being getting off the waitlist.

I'm still feeling a little apprehensive about my decision as I have yet to see the Berkeley planning department. I won't be able to visit the campus till July :-(...I based my decision entirely on info on the web, courses offerings, curriculum, professors' academic bios, and feedbacks from former Berkeley undergrads who majored in Urban Studies and are now UCLA MUP students.

It seemed you didn't enjoy Berkeley's Open House as much as UCLA's. How bad was it? Were the professors not very friendly? You said some were a little cocky? Can you tell me who they were in a private email (Kuang_hsu19@yahoo.com)? Did you have a chance to talk to any students outside of the transportation/regional planning areas? Sorry about this bombardment of questions! I'm trying to find out as much information as possible!

Thanks!
 

nyc_tribeca

Cyburbian
Messages
54
Points
4
As for enthusiasm, organization, unity etc., while I think these things as they exist in the overall program make the experience better (ease of dealing with admins, student morale, job resources), in grad school I think people end up focusing so much that their quality of life is more about peers in their immediate vicinity - people they work with on projects, individual professors in the focus area, connections they make to people in other departments for interdisciplinary reasons. Most planning departments I have seen usually have a short happy hour once a week, but beyond that there doesn't seem to be a lot of contact among the various concentrations. I guess it's in the "what you make of it" file.
 

smarshall

Cyburbian
Messages
26
Points
2
Hi jveverka81,

I'm interested in the practical side of planning (physical design, landuse planning, and environmental planning), so I picked Berkeley after being getting off the waitlist.

I'm still feeling a little apprehensive about my decision as I have yet to see the Berkeley planning department.
I wouldn't feel too apprehensive if I were you. I learned the term 'sustainability' from my time as an undergrad in Cal's CED and there are definitely design studios for the DCRP as well as courses in the Landscape Arch and Envi Des programs that I assume you could take. Best of luck and say hi to Wurster for me!
 

SF Urbanite

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
I'm currently an intern in the planning department at the Association of Bay Area Governments. There are a good amount of Berkeley graduates here who work in a variety of the departments. They all have good things to say about the City Planning program when they were enrolled, and since there are a number of them, this covers a wide time frame of graduation and enrollment periods. 70's through 2000's, in fact. Many of the folks who graduated a few decades ago have worked all over California, some all over the US, and some all around the world. One Berkeley grad has been working here for more than 20 years. It just goes to show that your life after graduation is what you make of it. From what I hear, UCLA and Berkeley both have excellent programs, with Berkeley's being perhaps a bit more prestigious, so don't limit yourself to one or the other on the notion that you'll get stuck in NorCal or SoCal. From what I've seen, it's a fairly fluid line of work. Anyway, best of luck in your decision, and congrats on your acceptance!
 

Richmond Jake

Cyburbian
Messages
18,256
Points
42
...[snip]..... One Berkeley grad has been working here for more than 20 years. It just goes to show that your life after graduation is what you make of it. ...[snip]....
Twenty years with one agency? In this profession? No. Really? There's more to life and career than being at one location for 20-years. Probably up to a senior planner by this point? Oh wait, ABAG. That explains everything.

Excuse my laughing out loud.
 

warderjack

Cyburbian
Messages
198
Points
7
Being that the application deadline for Cal - Berkeley is approaching reasonably soon, I have been working on statements for my application. For most other schools I have found some sort of guidance in terms of either word count, or how many single-space pages we were limited to. Has anybody seen this sort of information for Berkeley, for either the Personal History Statement, or the Statement of Purpose?
 

ToPlanIsMyFuture

Cyburbian
Messages
80
Points
4
I don't know, but I hope someone answers you soon cause I have the same question.

You might try calling the planning advisor. She isn't friendly and doesn't return phone calls, however you'll do both of us a favor IF she ever actually picks up the phone :)

Keep me posted
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,416
Points
25
Probably disgruntled from the Furloughs and pay freezes:D

Tack on the additional 15% fee increase for students this next semester and an additional 15% fee increase for the 2010-2011 school year and you have a lot of disgruntled students and employees at the UC
 

amplify99

Member
Messages
8
Points
0
I know Berkeley's summer career discovery program is new - I think 2010 may have been their first year. Did anyone go or know anyone who went? Any feedback or experiences would be greatly appreciated.
 

higgicd

Member
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5
Points
0
From their PhD admissions page... this is straightforward: "Most doctoral students enter the program with a master's degree in planning or a related field."

But I'm wondering about the next sentence here:

"The Master of City Planning is regarded as a terminal professional degree, and is not comparable to mid-study Master of Arts or Master of Science degrees offered in anticipation of the doctorate."

Coming from a Public Policy (MA) background, I am trying to break into the world of urban planning and policy, but don't know if the next step should just be applications to PhD programs, or if I would benefit more from a MUP.

Is the MUP not considered beneficial for a PhD in Planning?

I recognize that I need some relevant background in the field, but am not sure where, or what to apply to.
 

kalimotxo

Cyburbian
Messages
412
Points
13
I think what they are saying there is that MCP/MURP/MUP are the terminal degrees for planning professionals whereas MA and MS degrees are mid-level qualifying degrees falling between a BA/BS and a PhD. In essence, you generally need an MA or MS in a certain field to pursue a PhD in that field. This is not the case for planning PhD programs, which admit many people with MA Geog, MPP, MPA, MLArch, MSESci and other related degrees. Certainly having an MUP is beneficial for a PhD in planning, but depending on what you are studying for your dissertation may not be of more benefit than an MA in Sociology or an MPA.

If you want to "break into the world" of planning, a PhD probably isn't your best bet unless you intend to pursue a career in academia or maybe consulting. A less expensive option is looking for an entry level planning internship or job with your MPP to determine if it's a field you are truly interested in pursuing.

In terms of working as a planning professional, a PhD is not likely to give you a leg up on those with MCP degrees. In fact, the level of specific study required for a PhD will likely result in you having a less thorough general understanding of planning issues/concepts than a 2 year MCP degree. PhDs can be a handicap as well as some professional planning firms and agencies will quickly take an MCP (or even an MPP/MPA) with practical skills and experience over someone who has experienced the field exclusively in the sometimes esoteric academic realm.

Essentially it depends on what you want to do. If you want to investigate some planning-related issue at the PhD level and go on to academia, I'd say go for it. Otherwise, think long and hard before investing money and 3-4 years of your life getting a PhD as an entry to the profession.
 

higgicd

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Thank you for the quick reply.

Ultimately, I want the academic position to study TOD and alternative sources of financing for public transit.

I have been on a round of 'information interviews' of a few planning consultants, and many think that complimenting the strengths of my policy background with that of some urban planning credentials would go a long way towards achieving my goals.

I don't disagree. I want the practical side as well, and feel it would make me a better teacher. And I am aware of my drawbacks as a candidate at this point, especially considering many PhD programs look favourably on practical experience.

Pretty much I worry I am caught between two disciplines here, hence the 'break into planning' part. Cannot get a planning internship to get into a planning PhD without prior planning credentials.

Also, it seems as though in a PhD program you would end up taking many of the same classes as the MUP students, so I am wondering if that would make the MUP redundant for my purposes...

But again, thank you for your take on that, and sorry for the rant. haha.
 

kalimotxo

Cyburbian
Messages
412
Points
13
IMHO, if academia is really your goal then going into an appropriate planning PhD program might be the right step for you. Considering you have a well-defined research interest and a relevant masters degree and you've done your due diligence in terms of researching the discipline, an MCP may indeed be a step sideways (or is it diagonal? something like that). I've interacted with planning PhDs who made the leap from diverse backgrounds like natural resources and public policy into planning and have since landed university positions.

Your most important consideration is probably to identify PhD programs with the faculty and resources to fulfill your research focus... and I'm guessing that you've already done that. In different economic circumstances, most Cyburbians would probably recommend that you get relevant work experience, but planners are taking whatever they can get right now and the chances of you landing a position directly involving TOD are slim at best.

The best advice I can give is to cast a wide enough net in your school applications to increase your odds of landing a GTA position. Debt always sucks but the current state of the economy makes it especially risky. Whatever you choose to do, best of luck.
 

cng

Cyburbian
Messages
207
Points
9
Thank you for the quick reply.

Ultimately, I want the academic position to study TOD and alternative sources of financing for public transit.

I have been on a round of 'information interviews' of a few planning consultants, and many think that complimenting the strengths of my policy background with that of some urban planning credentials would go a long way towards achieving my goals.

I don't disagree. I want the practical side as well, and feel it would make me a better teacher. And I am aware of my drawbacks as a candidate at this point, especially considering many PhD programs look favourably on practical experience.

Pretty much I worry I am caught between two disciplines here, hence the 'break into planning' part. Cannot get a planning internship to get into a planning PhD without prior planning credentials.

Also, it seems as though in a PhD program you would end up taking many of the same classes as the MUP students, so I am wondering if that would make the MUP redundant for my purposes...

But again, thank you for your take on that, and sorry for the rant. haha.
I think having the practical experience would making teaching it even more enjoyable. A lot of urban planning lecturers, and even some professors, come with background beyond that of a research environment. Some are simply good journalistic observers. Others are sociologists, or demographers. Many others are practicing consultants. One of my favorite and best teacher I had in grad school was Paul Crawford. He had a public and private sector background, but ultimately ended up writing the handbook for form-based codes.

My B.A. was in Public Policy, and my thesis was on TOD efforts of the Gold Line in Los Angeles. That led me to get my MCRP in Planning... and today, I enjoy my work as a planner, working on real TOD issues at the city I work for, among a variety of other assignments. Urban planning is a broad and diverse field, and I would take advantage of that variety for a long-lasting and meaningful career.
 

Twin Citizen

Member
Messages
16
Points
1
Sorry for the delayed reply! I’m going to repost your questions from the message you sent me; I hope that’s okay.

clarsen asked:
I read that you participated in the [In]City program at Berkeley last summer and I was curious to hear your impressions. I'm thinking of applying for Summer '11, so it would be great to hear what you thought. Did there seem to be any difficulty getting accepted, or did you feel any sense of competitiveness for spots in the program? What did you do about housing? If I do apply I was sort of planning on finding a sublet in the area, since I just don't know if I could do dorms again, plus subletting seems to possibly be a bit cheaper. Do you feel it helped you get a better sense of the field of planning and prep you for thinking about grad school?


I’ll try my best to answer!

I sent in my application pretty early, about 6 weeks in advance of the deadline, and at the time I was under the impression that it was pretty easy to get into the program because I heard back within a week that I had been accepted. However, once I got to Berkeley I found out that they had chosen 70 people from 140 applicants, so I guess that’s a 50% acceptance rate.

I am really glad that I participated in the program and I do think it helped to solidify my grad school plans. Couple of things: this was the first year of the program. The landscape architecture and architecture programs had been held before, but not planning, so there were a few kinks to be worked out, mostly in terms of scheduling and expectations. The course consisted of lectures, seminars, and studios; lectures/seminars were led by Berkeley faculty and visiting professionals, and studios were led by grad students. The lectures/seminars covered pretty much every major field/specialization in planning so it was a nice overview of a lot of relevant topics. The overall “theme” was sustainability and climate planning, and our studio projects were tied into Berkeley’s Climate Action Plan. There were also field trips related to urban farming, trash, water, and the new Bay Bridge.

Plan to spend A LOT of time in studio. You’ll learn Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, and touch briefly on ArcGIS. You will learn these programs faster than you thought. There weren’t any assignments for the lecture portion of the course, just readings, and I think most people actually stopped doing the readings because studio took up so much time. The majority of our studio instructors also had an architecture background, and a few of the projects were a little more design-focused than I had anticipated, but learning how to present ideas and data visually is a really good skill to have, and I feel like I came away from the program with a better sense of how to do that. For our final project, we presented our design proposals to planning faculty, City of Berkeley representatives, and community activists.

Students came from a lot of different backgrounds, some very related to planning, some very different. There were a few undergraduates and a few 30-40 year olds, but I think the majority of people were mid-20s, a few years out of college. I think most of us lived in sublets in Berkeley or Oakland; there are also student co-ops and dorms available. The program director, Karen Frick, was very accessible and met with almost all of the students one-on-one to talk about careers, school, whatever. There were also a few “admissions/grad life advice” sessions with faculty and current students, which were kind of helpful.

Hmm…I hope that covers everything! Because it was the first year, I really think that nobody (program directors, students, studio instructors) really knew what to expect, and at the end of the session there was a lot of feedback on how to improve the course, so maybe next year it’ll be totally different! Students had different levels of satisfaction with the program, but I really think it's because
there was so little information ahead of time about what we were actually going to be doing. The best thing about it, for me, was that I came away thinking, “Yes, I am really interested in planning, I can hack it in a grad-level program, and I’m ready to go back to school.” Plus, you know, the Bay Area in the summer ain’t bad (although I had very little free time to enjoy it). Let me know if you have any other questions!
 

littlepear

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Thank you for this really helpful information. If one is already sure they want to study urban planning, do you think a summer program like the one at Berkeley is worth it or a good idea? Also, would it really help getting into a good masters program and would it hinder receiving financial aid for a masters program?
 

signmeup

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Confessions of a bitter reject!

UCB (DCRP) has lost all semblance of decency and is now spamming rejected applicants about their expensive summer programs (to learn adobe pdf, arc view and other crap taught by twenty somethings). While selling you on the strong possibility of admission the following fall. Strong professional, educational and life experiences in conjunction with great test scores might not be enough to get into their program but acquiring a credential from their summer program might make me “successful in gaining admission to UC Berkeley and other prestigious graduate programs.”

This is a new low that DCRP has sunk to; even lower than California Culinary Academy (a subsidiary of Career Education Corporation). What else can you expect when their captain, Richard Blum the primary owner of Career Education Corporation (CEC) is also a UC regent?
Bravo DCRP what is next: Late night infomercials?
 

jenmicah

Cyburbian
Messages
53
Points
4
I was pretty shocked to get that email as well...and not in a good way. Has more than a faint whiff of snake-oil salesmanship to it.
 

NickSticks

Cyburbian
Messages
163
Points
7
I was thinking the same thing.

I feel like it's fairly arrogant on their part to think that despite them rejecting us, we would pass up offers of admission at other schools just to attended the summer program and apply again next year.
 

onceandfuture

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Does anyone have familiarity with the Berkeley's [in]stitutes? They're branded as 6 week introductions into urban planning and architecture, but they are not for credit, do not "fast track" you into Berkeley (not surprisingly), and carry a hefty price tag of ~$3000. I don't have any experience with UP (applying for any even remotely related entry level jobs right now to gain experience) and so am exploring even pricey ways of building up my repertoire.

Thanks!
 

ColoGI

Cyburbian
Messages
2,568
Points
17
Does anyone have familiarity with the Berkeley's [in]stitutes? They're branded as 6 week introductions into urban planning and architecture, but they are not for credit, do not "fast track" you into Berkeley (not surprisingly), and carry a hefty price tag of ~$3000. I don't have any experience with UP (applying for any even remotely related entry level jobs right now to gain experience) and so am exploring even pricey ways of building up my repertoire.

Thanks!
IMHO if your parents are rich and won't have a cow, go for it. Otherwise, don't bother.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,416
Points
25
I don't have any experience with UP (applying for any even remotely related entry level jobs right now to gain experience) and so am exploring even pricey ways of building up my repertoire.

Thanks!
If you don't have a master's degree yet, better off getting a degree and using the 3K for at least 1/2 year of tuition. This job market will ill afford someone with no planning background for an entry level job.
 

amk

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
My friends in their phd tell me basically programs that you have to pay for are a money grab. Highly sought after students are given grants or funding and that is what admission committees look at favorably. My advice is save that $3000 and spend that time studying or getting volunteer experience.
 
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Hello all!

The College of Environmental Design at UC Berkely offers a summer program for post-baccalaureate students interested in environmental design careers, including architecture, city and regional planning, and landscape architecture. Our six-week summer programs give students the opportunity to test their enthusiasm for the material and culture of environmental design. You can find additional details at http://ced.berkeley.edu/academics/summer-programs/summer-institute/.

The application opens this Monday, December 16th. Students interested in the program should visit our website or email us directly at summer-institutes@berkeley.edu.

Moderator note:

*Hink As a note we try and moderate first posts that have email addresses. We would like to allow more interaction between schools and the students who are within this forum. Please provide more contact information for students, or be available to answer questions when asked in this thread. With that said, we are happy to provide you a forum to discuss this program.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Messages
10
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1
2016 [IN]CITY Program at UC Berkeley Now Accepting Applications

Happy 2016!

Just wanted to let everyone know that the application portal for the 2016 Summer [IN]STITUTE at UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design is now open here: cedslideroom.berkeley.edu.

The Institute is an introductory program geared towards post-baccalaureates who hold degrees in fields other than urban planning. The core intention of the [IN]CITY cohort is to:

- Give participants a real sense of the culture of a graduate-level planning studio in an intensive six-week format

- Develop a polished and professional portfolio containing real client projects for use in graduate school applications

- Hone communication, presentation and digital representation skills crucial for the study and practice of urban planning


I've seen the program, along with Harvard's Career Discovery and similar options, discussed in other threads. The most informative posts for those trying to decide whether these programs are "worth it" come from those who have actually graduated from such a program and can detail the pros and cons. But those posts are few and far between. I'm happy to put anyone interested in touch with alums from the Institute to get their feedback. You can also contact me directly with any questions (summer-institutes@berkeley.edu) and I'll do my best to help you figure out if the program is a good fit for you.
 
Messages
10
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Hello again!

I thought I should also let everyone know about the Disc* (Design & Innovation for Sustainble Cities) summer intensive offered July 5 - August 5 by UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design.

We launched it in 2014 as a brainchild of an urban designer at Gehl Studio and a CED DCRP/Arch alum, and it has doubled in size since then.

In a nutshell, Disc* is an interdisciplinary program that incorporates elements of environmental planning, urban design, landscape architecture, city planning, digital fabrication, and design thinking to confront the most pressing challenges of global urbanization. Participants graduate with a strong understanding of the present and future of global urbanization processes and a broad toolkit with which to tackle its urgent demands. They spend a very intense five weeks engaging in a lecture series, tech workshops, field work, site visits, and, at the core of the program, the studio.

We've gotten a good mix of international and domestic students in the past. Most participants are city planners or architects, but Disc* has also appealed to biologists, environmental scientists, structural and mechanical engineers, graphic designers, geographers, political scientists, economists, american studies students, and those great interdisciplinarians artists and art historians.

The program is pitched to currently enrolled undergrads, but we've seen that recent grads and graduate students whose research interests align with the Disc* curriculum have found the program to be very worthwhile.

More info here. And, as always, you can contact me directly. I've always appreciated the response I've gotten from the Cyburbia community.

Chrissie Bradley
College of Environmental Design
University of California, Berkeley
 
Messages
10
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UC Berkeley's Environmental Design Summer Programs currently accepting applications

Hello Again!

It's that time of year, and I'm putting the word out that UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design is accepting applications for its immersive summer programs.

You might have heard of [IN]CITY, our introduction to city and regional planning for recent graduates and upper-level undergraduates. We have another stellar line-up of client projects this summer, and our teaching team is a great balance of practitioners and academics who have put together curriculum that covers policy, research and design.

We also offer [IN]LAND, an introduction to landscape architecture; [IN]ARCH, an introduction to architecture; and [IN]ARCH ADV, an intermediate studio for those who already possess an undergraduate degree in architecture.

All of these Summer [IN]STITUTE programs (except [IN]ARCH ADV) assume that participants have little to no prior experience in design, and only the most basic understanding of the methods and methodologies of the discipline. You start from the ground up, and build a solid foundation of visual communication skills and subject matter expertise that will strengthen your graduate school application.

The Institute can also definitively answer that age-old question, "Do I want to spend the next 2+ (+++) years and X (+++) amount of dollars pursuing this subject?"

Like I've said in previous years, CED summer programs, and "career discovery"-type programs, are discussed elsewhere on Cyburbia. I encourage you to talk to people who have gone through similar programs, and I'm also happy to put you in touch with alums who can elaborate on their experiences.

And please don't hesitate to contact me directly!

Chrissie
Summer Programs Manager
summer-institutes@berkeley.edu
 
Messages
10
Points
1
UC Berkeley's Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities accepting applications for summer 2017!

Disc*2016 was a smashing success, and we're now accepting applications for Disc*2017!

Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities is an immersive five week summer program offered by UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design that welcomes undergraduates from all academic backgrounds to explore an interdisciplinary and multi-scalar approach to design and analysis in the urban environment.

Through a combination of design and digital fabrication, studio sessions, lectures and seminars, demos and workshops, field work and site visits, students engage in the discourse of urban innovation, while gaining the skills necessary to tackle the increasingly urgent demands of global urbanization.

And also, this:



I hope you'll join us this summer!

Chrissie
CED Summer Programs Manager
summerdiscovery@berkeley.edu
 
Messages
10
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Greetings from Berkeley!

The College of Environmental Design is now accepting applications for two immersive summer programs in City Planning and Urban Design through TUESDAY, JUNE 1.

[IN]CITY is a cohort within the Summer [IN]STITUTE in Environmental Design that introduces students to the study and practice of urban planning through the lens of sustainability. By attending daily lectures, media sessions, site visits and engaging in studio work, participants acquire the skills necessary to inform in-depth recommendations, analyses and proposals.

The program is designed to help prepare upper level college students and post-baccalaureates from academic backgrounds other than urban planning to apply for graduate programs in the urban planning discipline. [IN]CITY Academic Lead Eric Anderson explains the program's pedagogical approach:

[IN]CITY "challenges students to integrate scholarship with their own lived experience, creating a collaborative experiential learning environment. Ultimately, the goal of this process is to empower each student to work as part of a successful team and deliver theoretically grounded, yet eminently actionable recommendations to improve our communities." The program "encourages students to explore structural inequality through public health, public safety, and accessibility, as part of an effort to interrogate the causes and effects of privilege across the disciplines of city planning."

Disc* (Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities) is an intensive five-week summer program for currently enrolled college students that explores an interdisciplinary and multi-scalar approach to design and analysis in the urban environment. Disc* incorporates elements of urban design, city planning, architecture, digital fabrication and landscape architecture into the discourse of urban innovation.

Disc*2017 Co-Director Gabriel Kaprielian explains his motivation to develop Disc*: "There are some very exciting and innovative new strategies that cities are employing to adapt to social and environmental change. Smart City technologies are harnessing the ability to gather information on how people use cities to better design responsive environments. Reality Computing technologies seek to bridge the gap between physical and virtual environments of design. Cities are beginning to rethink the massive allocation of public streets to cars by taking back real estate for pedestrians, plazas, parklets, and bicycles. Urban infrastructure is being redesigned to work with the natural environment through a more integrated systems thinking. Great changes are underway, however much more needs to be done."


Applications can be submitted through cedberkeley.slideroom.com.

We hope you'll join us on the UC Berkeley campus this summer!

Please contact Chrissie Bradley at summer-institutes@berkeley.edu for more information.
 

DCRPGRAD

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Greetings!

The Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) at UC Berkeley actively seeks to reach out to various communities to diversify our Master of City Planning program and the profession.

Every year, we offer prospective applicants in-person and online opportunities to get to know us. We invite you to attend our Fall Open House for Prospective Masters Students on Monday, October 9, 2017 from 9:00AM-12:00PM (registration begins at 8:30AM) to meet our faculty, current students and staff and to learn more about various graduate programs we offer. To RSVP, please complete the registration form.

In addition to the open house, we invite you all to participate in a Program & Admissions Webinar hosted by the graduate advisers featuring an overview of program, admission requirements and process, curriculum, graduate funding, as well as a question-and-answer session. In addition to the webinars, our M.C.P. Program Co-Chairs will host Conference Calls to provide insight into the faculty perspective of the MCP program. To RSVP for the various online events, please complete the registration form here.

In the meantime, our the Graduate Advising Team are an available resource to you - as we are happy answer any questions you may have! Feel free to email us at dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu or give us a call at 510-643-9440. You can also schedule an in-person, phone or Skype meeting with us. We look forward to meeting each of you!


Warm regards,
Kathleen Pera and Clay Hall
Graduate Student Services
Department of City and Regional Planning
College of Environmental Design
University of California, Berkeley
Tel 510.643.9440
Email dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu
http://dcrp.ced.berkeley.edu
 

DCRPGRAD

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Greetings!

The Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) at UC Berkeley actively seeks to reach out to various communities to diversify our Master of City Planning (MCP) applicant pool and the profession.

To get to know us, we invite you to attend our upcoming Fall Open House on Monday, October 8 (registration begins at 8AM). During the half-day event, you will learn about our graduate programs, talk to current students, meet with faculty and audit courses. If you are interested in attending, please reserve your spot by Monday, October 1. Registration is required and free! ALL ARE WELCOME!

In the meantime, our Graduate Advising team (Kathleen Pera and Clay Hall) are available resource to you during the application process and we are happy answer any questions you may have! Feel free to email us at dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu or give us a call at 510-643-9440 (Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm, PST). You may also schedule an in-person, phone or Zoom meeting with us!

We hope you will join us for the event and we look forward to connecting with each of you!


Warm regards,
Kathleen Pera and Clay Hall
Graduate Student Services
Department of City and Regional Planning

College of Environmental Design
University of California, Berkeley
Tel 510.643.9440
Email dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu
http://dcrp.ced.berkeley.edu
 

DCRPGRAD

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Greetings!

The Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) at UC Berkeley actively seeks to reach out to various communities to diversify our Master of City Planning (MCP) applicant pool and the profession.

To get to know us, we invite you to attend our upcoming Fall Open House on Monday, October 8 (registration begins at 8AM). During the half-day event, you will learn about our graduate programs, talk to current students, meet with faculty and audit courses. If you are interested in attending, please reserve your spot by THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4 (DEADLINE EXTENDED). Registration is required and free! ALL ARE WELCOME!

In the meantime, our Graduate Advising team (Kathleen Pera and Clay Hall) are available resource to you during the application process and we are happy answer any questions you may have! Feel free to email us at dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu or give us a call at 510-643-9440 (Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm, PST). You may also schedule an in-person, phone or Zoom meeting with us!

We hope you will join us for the event and we look forward to connecting with each of you!


Warm regards,
Kathleen Pera and Clay Hall
Graduate Student Services
Department of City and Regional Planning
College of Environmental Design
University of California, Berkeley
Tel 510.643.9440
Email dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu
http://dcrp.ced.berkeley.edu
 

DCRPGRAD

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Greetings!

This is a friendly reminder that you are invited you to participate in our FREE ONLINE ADMISSION EVENTS via Zoom (Video Conferencing Service).You may test your connection here.

To register for the online events, please click on the dates below or on our flyer.

Conference Calls With MCP Program Chair: Paul Waddell
Wednesdays, 3-4PM (PST)
These sessions will allow you to gain insight into the faculty perspective of our program. Our chair will be open to answering all of your questions!


MCP Program & Admission Webinars: DCRP Graduate Advisors
Thursdays, 1-2PM (PST)
These webinars will provide you with an overview of our graduate program, admissions requirements/tips, funding, admission statistics, career services, and employment. The final 15 20 minutes will allow the opportunity for Q&A.


Application Questions Webinar: DCRP Graduate Advisors
Thursday, December 6, 1-2PM (PST)
This will be your FINAL opportunity to gain answers to your LAST MINUTE application questions BEFORE the M.C.P. program online application deadline (Monday, December 17)!

As always, we are here to answer any questions you may have about the programs we offer and application process.


We hope you all have a good rest of your week!
Clay & Kathleen
Graduate Student Services
Department of City and Regional Planning | College of Environmental Design
University of California, Berkeley
228 Wurster Hall, MC 1850
Berkeley, CA 94720
Tel 510.643.9440
Email dcrpgrad@berkeley.edu
http://dcrp.ced.berkeley.edu
 

Dan

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Moved all (or most) of the University of California - Berkeley threads to a single thread, to make it easier for Google, Bing, and you to find it. :)

Cal vs [some other school] discussions are still in their own threads.
 
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