• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Univ of Pennsylvania 🇺🇸 University of Pennsylvania (Penn) thread

cmdrico7812

Cyburbian
Messages
45
Points
2
Has anyone heard anything about the new Masters of Urban Spatial Analystics program at the University of Pennsylvania? I am quite interested in doing that after I'm done with my masters here at MSU. Just curious if anyone has heard anything about it or is currently in it.
 

adavids1

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
So who else out there chose Penn? Lets get to know our class before we get to Philly this fall :) . Maybe people in geographical proximity would like to meet up?

I'm Adam, 23, and currently live in Sacramento, CA. I did my undergrad at Tulane and chose Penn over USC, UCLA, Tufts, and NYU.

Your turn :h:
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
Salutations, Adam, from just outside of DC! I too am headed to Penn in the fall, probably in time for the August session to squeeze in some last minute learnin' before school starts in earnest. Did you go to the open house a couple of weeks ago?

cheers,
tamara
 

meesh47

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
I am still trying to decide! I was out of the country when my acceptances came in and asked the schools to give me a little more time. I am deciding between Penn and UCLA. The issue for me is money-- while Penn did give me some grant money, UCLA is still less than half the cost for me, a California resident. I went to UCLA for undergrad, however, and while I liked the school, the thought of going back for 2 years is not exactly thrilling.

I've been reading a lot about how it's not worth it to rack up debt... so I worry about attending Penn. I wonder, what is it about Penn that made you guys choose it over other schools? Could those of you who went to the Open House tell me what your impressions were?
 

adavids1

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
meesh47 said:
I've been reading a lot about how it's not worth it to rack up debt... so I worry about attending Penn. I wonder, what is it about Penn that made you guys choose it over other schools? Could those of you who went to the Open House tell me what your impressions were?
I actually went to both the Penn and UCLA open houses and for me the differences were night and day. I too would get in-state at UCLA, but keep in mind that the costs of living in LA are much higher. I would say almost double. What ruled UCLA out for me was both its focus on California, specifically LA, and the planning student bodies heavy emphasis on activism. I wanted an education that was both worldly and practical. What works for LA is hard to extrapolate to the rest of country. I think if you want to stay in LA, USC is honestly the better choice. Now, before we get too off-topic, send me a private message and I can give you much more detailed impressions.
Good Luck!

Tamara,
Unfortunately I won't be able to make it to the pre-session! I'm not sure how I would bone up for the pre-reqs, especially the one in Urban Design as I never took a class in it, but Prof. Birch told me I didn't have to worry. Nonetheless I will. In any case, do you know what you want your concentration to be?

-Adam
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
greetings! it's a tough call. take a look at these threads. they all delve into various aspects of Penn's program and represents a whole series of different views.

Harvard MUP vs Univ of Pennsylvania MCP
Urban planning in a design or policy school? (or USC vs Penn)
Georgia Tech vs. Penn: Request for an Employer's Perspective
Open house report

good luck!
 
Messages
21
Points
2
adavids1 said:
So who else out there chose Penn? Lets get to know our class before we get to Philly this fall :) . Maybe people in geographical proximity would like to meet up?
Your turn :h:
Funny we haven't gotten any proximity yet, but I'll be attending Penn in the Fall, coming from Atlanta. I went to the open house two weeks ago, and applied a multivariate, multi emotional equation to arrive at the decision. I hope to keep ties with Atlanta and DC. I chose Penn over Portland State, Rutgers, Virginia Tech, UMD, Georgia Tech and MIT.
 

meesh47

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
I decided on Penn, because I think it's time to get some experience and ideas outside of Cali, and the administration seems great. Yay!! See the rest of you there-- Marie, 24, from San Diego. I chose Penn over UCLA and Columbia.
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
hi all,

not to be paranoid or anything, but i was wondering if you had received any type of confirmation from Penn after you'd sent in your deposit... much appreciated.
 

rn0521

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
I too will be attending Penn (and am thrilled to be doing so), and plan to attend the August session.

Carfree -- I've yet to receive a confirmation, and my check has not been cashed either. I'd give it a few more days -- I get the impression from this board that there are always a few stragglers who didn't make a decision by the 15th.

Have other folks started looking for apartments? I'm having a heck of a time finding anything for August on craigslist... I suppose it is still a tad early.
 

PennPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
Congratulations to those coming to Penn. Philadelphia is a wonderful city if you haven't been here before or have barely explored the town. Of course, today is a warm spring day and one may feel differently during the depths of the winter.

For apartments, there are plenty of undergraduates looking for summer subletters. Check out the daily pennsylvanian website and their classified section for sublets.
 

meesh47

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
I'm one of the stragglers (sorry!). If you want confirmation, I would suggest calling the dept., they're very helpful.

I'll probably apply for the campus housing, but if I decide I'd rather live in an apt. then look for one later, if I can find a roommate that is.
 

ChevyChaseDC

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
Congratulations and welcome to the Department of City and Regional Planning. Start exercising now, when you arrive in Philadelphia you'll quickly consume your entire body weight in cheesesteaks, soft pretzels, TastyKake, water ice, and Yuengling.
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
i've been scoping out craigslist too and haven't seen much starting in Aug. penn has a good search engine for off campus housing though @ http://www.business-services.upenn.edu/offcampusliving/

it let's you search listings as well as read landlord reviews.

i've been debating getting an apt in Center City starting as early as July to just not have to stress about it closer to August or Sept, but it's a month's worth of double rent... :-( that said rent in Philly is much more affordable than in DC, and there are some pretty cool apts out there! :)
 

PennPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
I would not recommend on-campus housing, the few that lived in the grad towers hated it and moved out when they could. It is more expensive than what you would pay for a comparable place off campus, and for the price you pay you can get a rather nice place in center city or west Philadelphia.

Although one can't beat the convenience of being on campus, but most of your peers will be living off campus. Three popular areas were university city (40th to 45th or thereabouts), Powelton Village, and Fitler Square area (center city from Rittenhouse Square to the River). My personal favorite is Fitler Square/Rittenhouse but it does come with a price tag. West Philadelphia/University city has a fantastic stock of late 19th century rowhouses, but some crime issues and one never feels completely safe there. Powelton Village is a bit off the beaten track although it is closer to Meyerson Hall than parts of University City/West Philadelphia. It is largely habited by Drexel students.

Some students choose to live further downtown (society hill/Old City) or even up in Manayunk, although they end up spending a small fortune in transportation costs and have to carefully plan their schedules.
 

adavids1

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
Housing

PennPlanner, ChevyChase, or any other current Penn student:
I read that a lot of housing is found in the early summer, and if you wait till August it's slim pickings. Is that essentially true? When's a good time to find a place and any suggestions for finding roommates before the session starts?
 

meesh47

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
Thanks PennPlanner. I'm used to living in west LA with the huge price tags that come with it, and it will be nice to go to a city where I can get a decent apt. at a decent cost, altho I will have to factor in the cost of shipping my stuff out and getting furniture. Grr. So much to do!

Who's going to the early session? I don't think I can as I will be working through August, but I don't want to be behind when I get there.
 
Messages
21
Points
2
carfree said:
hi all,

not to be paranoid or anything, but i was wondering if you had received any type of confirmation from Penn after you'd sent in your deposit... much appreciated.

I talked with the dept today and they are still sorting through all the acceptances. They think they will have a class of about 55-60. They will send out confirmations and recommendations for study around May 10.

Water Ice?
 

PennPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
Not only is Philadelphia a large city but it is also an university town, so there is always a high turnover of apartments. But generally, most leases run from June to June, from what I gather. Depending on what you are looking for, if you want your own private place you may have more trouble finding a good apartment in the more popular areas (namely, center city, Rittenhouse Square, the more desirable blocks of university city) if you wait until August. If you are looking for a room in an apartment/house with other graduate students, you should be able to find something at any time.

Not only is Craig's List possible, check out the daily pennsylvanian classified for housing advertisements. There are several landlords who advertize through the DP and who have a large stock of apartments, so if you speak with them you may be able to reserve something early on.
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
Hi PennPlanner and ChevyChaseDC, are there any streets between the Rittenhouse Sq area and Penn that you'd recommend or any large apt buildings that are worth checking out? I've found lots of links online, but was curious if you had any inside info.

Much appreciated! :)
 

PennPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
I won't be able to give you names of buildings as it is one thing I do not keep tabs on (except for Fitler Commons, a friend lives there).

Streets are: Chestnut, Walnut, Locust, Spruce and Pine, including smaller alleys/streets such as Delancey, Panama, Irvine. The smaller streets are not continuous on the grid but pop up here and there. The N-S streets would be 18th to 25th, so if an apartment is advertised at 2203 Locust, it is within this Rittenhouse/Fitler Square region.

The area east of Rittenhouse Square (same streets, from Broad (14th) to 18th streets tend to be louder and more commercial (but still very liveable), and do not have the tree canopy of the western region.
 

Peter Bratt

Cyburbian
Messages
113
Points
6
Did anyone else make it to U Penn for the open house yesterday? I found it to be pretty informative, although the financies are going to be a huge burden if I do end up attending the program.

Peter
 

The District

Cyburbian
Messages
375
Points
12
No, but...

didn't go to the UPenn open house, but i'll be at the MIT one in a couple weeks. i'll give a report thereafter. i know lots of people are interested in that school.
 

Peter Bratt

Cyburbian
Messages
113
Points
6
Open House at UPenn

The open house was a good experience. From what it sounds like, UPenn offers admission to students that have 1) a GPA over 3.0 for undergrad, 2) a GRE score over the 550 range for Verbal and 600 for Quantitaive, 3) a strong personal statement, and 4) good recommendations.

I would think that the application process is pretty competititve, but the funding will be varied. The tuition at Penn is 30k, while the cost of living in Philly for the year is estimated at 20K. So, expect to take out loans if you do not get a Research Assistant position.

I personally was really impressed by the City Planning department. A good number of the professors were attending the sessions, and the facilities are very strong. So, I'll be getting my application ready for January.
 
Messages
5
Points
0
Can anyone tell me anything about UPenn's MCP program? ie admissions stories/stats, reputation in field, etc? any kind of information (anecdotal is fine) would be greatly appreciated
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Its a very theoretical degree, i.e. lots of planning history, theory, but no real practical app.

If that is what you are looking for by all means....it is an Ivy league degree, so it has that going for it, or against it depending on whom you speak.

If you are looking for practical apps., check out Temple Ambler's program. Alot of the coursework is taught by some of the local "players" not simply those who have spent their entire life in academia.
 

RadioAgony

Cyburbian
Messages
68
Points
4
i think i would disgaree with that a bit. while i ultimately decided that penn wasn't the right place for me, i was quite impressed with a lot of the design work the students did. they seemed to have really impressive facilities for that type of thing, and i think there's much more hands on design work at penn because they have much less of a policy focus (practically zero, actually) than some of the other "top" programs. it would be a good place to check out if you're interested in being a planning consultant or are interested in community development/non-profit work, but probably not what you're looking for if you want to be a traditional planner in the public sector.
 

wahday

Cyburbian
Messages
3,960
Points
23
I went to Penn for undergrad and grad school, but not in planning (that came later). I had a little interaction with the department which I also felt seemed a bit removed from direct work with the community (this was when they were floating their University City renewal plan which has certainly dramatically impacted the area - though I don't always think for the better).

The heavy theory emphasis is not necessarily a bad thing, depending on where you want to go with your career. This was actually the same situation with my grad program (too theoretical, not enough application) and so this was not a model I wished to duplicate the second time around (ie. I didn't want to be a professor).

I think Jeff mentioned Temple, which is also an excellent school in many areas (though it often does not get its due credit) but I don't know about planning specifically. Their media arts and dance programs, for example, are very impressive these days.
 

PennPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
I received a MCP from Penn in 2005. Now work in real estate consulting (an excel whore I am).

The department has gone through a period of transition and has now established itself on the track where it wants to be. Penn Planning has three strengths: urban design, transportation planning, and community planning, and is aiming to improve its environmental planning component. Theory plays a very minimal role these days at Penn (which wasn't the case as recent as a decade ago).

Although I only took a handful of design classes, design is a growing forte of the program and probably was the most popular concentration for my year, and transportation planning also has a strong faculty. The program offers a certificate in real estate design and development which allows you to cross register classes at Wharton, and which is growing in popularity (regardless of where you end up and what field you practice in, I do strongly recommend taking a real estate class or two).

Overall, the program has merits. An excellent faculty, a wonderful city, close relationships between the faculty and key makers and shakers in Philadelphia's planning and development world, excellent planning studios, and the availability of classes in the other divisions at Penn (architecture, landscape, engineering, law, and Wharton) are its strengths. But if you are looking to be a traditional planner in a planning office don't waste the money at Penn. Looking back I would have been better off working a few more years and aiming for Wharton than trying to become a developer by getting a MCP (big mistake), and one of the downsides of the program is that too many people muddle through their two years not really knowing what they want to do afterwards and graduate after spending 80K or more and still do not know what they want to do and become a bit bitter having to settle for some low paying 40K year job as a trail conservation manager.
 
Messages
5
Points
0
PennPlanner said:
I received a MCP from Penn in 2005. Now work in real estate consulting (an excel whore I am).

The department has gone through a period of transition and has now established itself on the track where it wants to be. Penn Planning has three strengths: urban design, transportation planning, and community planning, and is aiming to improve its environmental planning component. Theory plays a very minimal role these days at Penn (which wasn't the case as recent as a decade ago).

Although I only took a handful of design classes, design is a growing forte of the program and probably was the most popular concentration for my year, and transportation planning also has a strong faculty. The program offers a certificate in real estate design and development which allows you to cross register classes at Wharton, and which is growing in popularity (regardless of where you end up and what field you practice in, I do strongly recommend taking a real estate class or two).

Overall, the program has merits. An excellent faculty, a wonderful city, close relationships between the faculty and key makers and shakers in Philadelphia's planning and development world, excellent planning studios, and the availability of classes in the other divisions at Penn (architecture, landscape, engineering, law, and Wharton) are its strengths. But if you are looking to be a traditional planner in a planning office don't waste the money at Penn. Looking back I would have been better off working a few more years and aiming for Wharton than trying to become a developer by getting a MCP (big mistake), and one of the downsides of the program is that too many people muddle through their two years not really knowing what they want to do afterwards and graduate after spending 80K or more and still do not know what they want to do and become a bit bitter having to settle for some low paying 40K year job as a trail conservation manager.
Ah, thanks for the advice. I deferred a year at the law school, but increasingly i'm thinking about doing the joint JD/MCP
 

jlc221

Member
Messages
23
Points
2
So you think it's a good idea to go to Penn if I want to work at a planning consultancy? What would be a better school to go to if I want to work in government? Rutgers?

I received a MCP from Penn in 2005. Now work in real estate consulting (an excel whore I am).

The department has gone through a period of transition and has now established itself on the track where it wants to be. Penn Planning has three strengths: urban design, transportation planning, and community planning, and is aiming to improve its environmental planning component. Theory plays a very minimal role these days at Penn (which wasn't the case as recent as a decade ago).

Although I only took a handful of design classes, design is a growing forte of the program and probably was the most popular concentration for my year, and transportation planning also has a strong faculty. The program offers a certificate in real estate design and development which allows you to cross register classes at Wharton, and which is growing in popularity (regardless of where you end up and what field you practice in, I do strongly recommend taking a real estate class or two).

Overall, the program has merits. An excellent faculty, a wonderful city, close relationships between the faculty and key makers and shakers in Philadelphia's planning and development world, excellent planning studios, and the availability of classes in the other divisions at Penn (architecture, landscape, engineering, law, and Wharton) are its strengths. But if you are looking to be a traditional planner in a planning office don't waste the money at Penn. Looking back I would have been better off working a few more years and aiming for Wharton than trying to become a developer by getting a MCP (big mistake), and one of the downsides of the program is that too many people muddle through their two years not really knowing what they want to do afterwards and graduate after spending 80K or more and still do not know what they want to do and become a bit bitter having to settle for some low paying 40K year job as a trail conservation manager.
 

The District

Cyburbian
Messages
375
Points
12
yet another anecdote suggesting the value of a masters in real estate over an MCP, if your goal is actually doing development.
 

jlc221

Member
Messages
23
Points
2
I received a MCP from Penn in 2005. Now work in real estate consulting (an excel whore I am).

The department has gone through a period of transition and has now established itself on the track where it wants to be. Penn Planning has three strengths: urban design, transportation planning, and community planning, and is aiming to improve its environmental planning component. Theory plays a very minimal role these days at Penn (which wasn't the case as recent as a decade ago).

Although I only took a handful of design classes, design is a growing forte of the program and probably was the most popular concentration for my year, and transportation planning also has a strong faculty. The program offers a certificate in real estate design and development which allows you to cross register classes at Wharton, and which is growing in popularity (regardless of where you end up and what field you practice in, I do strongly recommend taking a real estate class or two).

Overall, the program has merits. An excellent faculty, a wonderful city, close relationships between the faculty and key makers and shakers in Philadelphia's planning and development world, excellent planning studios, and the availability of classes in the other divisions at Penn (architecture, landscape, engineering, law, and Wharton) are its strengths. But if you are looking to be a traditional planner in a planning office don't waste the money at Penn. Looking back I would have been better off working a few more years and aiming for Wharton than trying to become a developer by getting a MCP (big mistake), and one of the downsides of the program is that too many people muddle through their two years not really knowing what they want to do afterwards and graduate after spending 80K or more and still do not know what they want to do and become a bit bitter having to settle for some low paying 40K year job as a trail conservation manager.
Penn Planner, did you know anyone in your program who got an historical preservation certificate as well? Also, do your classmates seem happy with the jobs they have now?
 

bdhumphreys

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
Is anyone planning on going to the Penn Open House on April 9th?

I am interested to find out more about the MCP program. I am especially intrigued by the dual masters MBA. Does anyone have some insight on the dual degrees? Do students at PennDesign have a leg up on admissions to Wharton with an acceptable application and GMAT scores?
 
Messages
15
Points
1
an almost-Penn MCP student

Hi,

I'm currently a student at Rutgers but I had originally enrolled in the Penn MCP program. I had looked into a number of grad programs and was impressed by their design focus, plus I love the city of Phila. It seems these days that they do a lot of hands-on projects (studios) but what seemed strange to me is that they often traveled to distant places to do so (Cape Cod, Florida, Brazil). Fine if you want to get national or int'l experience but I wanted local experience. Furthermore, I'm not too partial to the idea of the 'expert' going into a foreign community for a few weeks and creating a plan for them.. huh?

Anyway, Penn's a fine school but for me it came down to financing.. Penn expects you to pay ivy league tuition while Rutgers provides generous scholarships and some fellowship and graduate assistantships. There is a lot of opportunity to work on local NJ and NY / Phili area projects, particuarly as a paid research asst. through school.

Rutgers has a big policy focus (the other half of the graduate school is policy) but is weak in the area of design (contrary to Penn whose program is conjoined with the architecture/design school).

I have noticed, as I am still on a variety of Penn email lists, that Penn does a hefty job assisting their graduates in finding positions, often in the private sector as design consultants or whatnot. Rutgers provides some job assistance but no where near the level of job fairs, firm visits and on-campus interviews like Penn. It makes sense, as I'm sure they understand you need to start paying back your tuition loans quickly!

Any other questions.. feel free to email.
 

tangtoni

Member
Messages
4
Points
0
-jessaminakinamy

So u think Rutgers is a good choice. How about Rutgers, Umich, Columbia and U washington in seattle, which one do u recommend? as I've got admissions from those universities and i'm wondering which one to choose
 

dmstrathy

Member
Messages
9
Points
0
I can't speak for Rutgers yet (I'll be at the Open House on Thursday), but I just got back yesterday from Ann Arbor, and I was really really impressed with Michigan. I'm hoping Rutgers blows me away though, because Michigan is going to be a lot pricier than Rutgers for me...
 

tangtoni

Member
Messages
4
Points
0
I can't speak for Rutgers yet (I'll be at the Open House on Thursday), but I just got back yesterday from Ann Arbor, and I was really really impressed with Michigan. I'm hoping Rutgers blows me away though, because Michigan is going to be a lot pricier than Rutgers for me...


Aha, since I can't go to the US right now, I'll wait for your news about rutgers and michigan ^^
 

Zohra

Member
Messages
4
Points
0
hey can anyone tell me what the class structure is like for MCP at Penn. Basically I want to know the proportion of International students in a class.
 

Zohra

Member
Messages
4
Points
0
hey... did anyone land up at the Penn open house on monday?
being on the other side of the planet, I wasnt able to make it myself...
but it would be cool if anyone of you who's attended could give me a little briefing about the event and the impressions of the place...
and any particular dough on the urban design specialisation would be a god send!!
thanks
 

bdhumphreys

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
I went and here is what I thought...

First, the campus is amazing. The buildings are incredibly beautiful and it seems like a fantastic place to go to school. With that being said, Meyerson Hall where the majority of planning classes are held, like many buildings that house design schools, is pretty terrible. Most of the facilities the planning students utilize are bad, but they did just open a new room in the historic building across from Meyerson that is quite nice.

The faculty and professor, as well as the students were all very pleasant. I particularly enjoyed talking with Professor Larice (more info at this link) http://www.design.upenn.edu/new/cplan/facultybio.php?fid=323. He gave me a pretty good pitch on why Penn is the place to go if interested in Urban Design saying something to the effect that the only comparable school is Harvard GSD, because it is the only other program that offers as many studios to design students. The students echoed this telling me that the Urban Design concentration has significantly improved since his arrival. Also, the planetizen study supports this with Penn receiving the #2 ranking behind Harvard for a concentration in Urban Design.

Everyone seemed very excited about where the Penn program stands and where it is going. The director of the department announced that next fall Prof. Landis, who is currently at Berkeley, would be joining the faculty at Penn. It seems that they are committed to making Penn one of the top programs.

Other important things to know about the program.
  • They stress practice over theory. Many of the classes are taught by working professionals, not academics
  • Most of their studios are based on Philadelphia. They do have some classes focused on other areas (e.g. looking at planning/housing in Kenya, something upcoming in India and a soon to be completed, very large scale study of Florida), but they are otherwise almost totally focused on the surrounding areas.
  • The Urban Design program is focused on computers and technology, not on drawing and the sketch. Larice pitched this as a positive, and it may be, but I know some practitioners believe that sketching is still an important skill to have even with the new technology that exist

If you have anymore questions, feel free to ask, or pm if you need to.
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
int'l students at UPenn MCP

Hi,

To answer your question, in my class (I'm a 2nd year student graduating in 2 weeks) there are just a handfull of international students ~ perhaps 2-3 out of roughly 70-ish students.
 

carfree

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
Dual Degree - MCP/MBA at UPenn

Is anyone planning on going to the Penn Open House on April 9th?

I am interested to find out more about the MCP program. I am especially intrigued by the dual masters MBA. Does anyone have some insight on the dual degrees? Do students at PennDesign have a leg up on admissions to Wharton with an acceptable application and GMAT scores?
Hi,
I'm a 2nd year MCP student. The one person I know in our program who applied to Wharton during her first year at PennDesign didn't get in. She's smart, articulate, and ambitious, but I suspect her age and brief work experience (2 years) overshadowed her being a Penn grad student. Wharton's loss... That said, I do know she secured an interview.

There are a bunch of dual degree students though. If you'd like to talk to them, I recommend you contact the Planning Office and ask for Kathleen. She might be able to share contact information of one/two of the students.
 

pazzo83

Cyburbian
Messages
61
Points
4
So, who's decided to step into the deep hole of debt? :)

Anyway, are any of you guys going to the Bootcamp thingy that starts Aug 18? I think it should be a good transition for getting back into school-mode and all (at least for me who's been out a couple years).

Also neighborhoods, who's livin in West Philly? Center City? Elsewhere? I personally decided on West Philly to be closer to school, plus the rent is cheaper. I was looking at South st but they are closing that bridge for the year which would make getting to class a pain.

I created a group on facebook if any of yall are on there, join if you'd like: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=26289181802&ref=mf
 

gobabygo

Member
Messages
16
Points
1
Penn in the fall

I'll be at Penn in the fall, and I'm attending both weeks for bootcamp.

I live off City Avenue in the Wynnefield Heights section of West Philly. I'm about 15 minutes from campus when driving, 30 minutes by bus. I've been here for 2.5 years though, so I don't have to go through the pain of moving for school this time. :)
 

Tide

Cyburbian
Messages
2,718
Points
23
I know someone currently in Penn for Masters in Design and a PhD starting this fall.
 

lycosidae

Cyburbian
Messages
53
Points
4
I am liking this program. Seems like they have a good economic development/policy focus, compared to Penn's planning program which is more design-oriented...

Does anyone have experience with Penn's Masters of Government Administration? What about funding? It is my understanding that the funding opportunities are a little better than the Design school (which is lame), though it is slightly more difficult to get into according to admissions stats... I'm not really worried about getting in, more worried about funding (which guides most of my school decisions).

I'm more interested in economic development than land-use.

P
 

sofia2050

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Fels

Hey

I am going to study there from Jan'09 and I wonder if u have decided to do the Master there too?
I will take the certificate in politics though...
Let me know how u see the courses there,

thnx
s
 

Victory

Cyburbian
Messages
258
Points
10
I attended the open house, but I had to leave after the job/alumni panel because I had to catch a flight back to los angeles. If you attended, what were thoughts of the program, school, students (especially if you stayed for happy hour)?

I found the few students I chatted with engaging, very intelligent, seemingly hard working, and even a bit quirky. The presentation sold me on working in Philadelphia, and studying at Penn. However jobs (after graduation), money, making a living, debt, etc., seemed to be far more important to the people attending the presentation than those who were current students. A lot of them seemed to have a "whatever happens happens" attitude.
 

wvhoo

Cyburbian
Messages
63
Points
4
Did not attend, but the school has rapidly sprung up the list of choices. The faculty and staff has been ridiculously helpful (offered to have a meeting with the chair without me even asking for it) when I go on my own mini open house in two weeks. I'm heading to 7 different classes so I figure I'll get a great feel.

I'll try to learn more about their career assistance, etc when I'm there. And will report back.
I'm more of " whatever happens, happens" type of guy, though, too.
 
Top