• Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no echo chambers. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! You can also register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account.

urban revolution

micky

Member
Messages
2
Points
0
hey everyone!!!!!!!
im new to this and i was just wondering if anyone will tell me what is the urban revolution? as well as 5 factors that contibuted to the urban revolution.
thanks guys!!!!!!!!!
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
What exam are you studying for? Sounds like a book written by the prof giving the exam!! ;)
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
It is good to see that the academics are still spewing theory like it actually has an application in the real world. Do a search at Google, with urban revolution in parenthesis and you will find 2,480 hits. Of which, approximately 2% will actually be relevant to what you seek.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
What are we talking here...

Urban Revolution as in the shift from an agricultural economy to industrial, like early 1900s.

5 Factors that contributed...HMMMM

Immigration
The Cotton Gin
Automobile
Tenement Houses
Great, Great Granpop Guapo
 

Wannaplan?

Galactic Superstar
Messages
3,144
Points
27
If you are talking about North America, then maybe Mike is on the mark, however, I would attribute the automobile to the Suburban Revolution.

Cities have a long history. Yet, you should probably look to the history of human settlement patterns to get any understanding why humans thought it might be good to concentrate together in high densities. The first thing that comes to mind are the city-states of ancient Greece. Because of successful agricultural practices and intensive trade with nearby cultures, including increasing technological sophistication with bountiful natural resources, Greece was able to form, whether intentional or not, a class system. Farming provided more free time, and those that didn't farm, either were merchants, laborers, clerics, or artists. How these events coalesce into a government, arguably the first democracy, is a mystery to me. Somehow, cooperation to form a "society" is part of the formula. Also, their education system must of had some kind of influence.

But then those nasty Romans came in with their effective armies and assimilated the Grecian culture into their own.

Of course, this loose explanation has clear Western bias. I have no idea how urbanization occured in Asia. Spiro Kostov has a gerat book on the history of cities, entitled "The City Shaped." Great stuff! Get it if you don't already have it.
 
Top