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Used car lots

Vlaude

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
How do I get rid of these uses!?!?! I am reviewing the complan and the primary frontage on the City's most traveled road is riddled with used car lots and accessory type uses to used car sales. My idea, is to start to move these uses towards less traveled arterials. And take advantage of the high traffic counts for retail type uses, which the city will gain revenues from sales tax. Not to mention it would make the thoroughfare more pleasing aesthetically.

Someone has suggested setting a build dozer on one end and leave the key in it in hopes of some kids might have a fun time on a Friday night... Ofcourse let the police know there are more important things to respond too, lol...

HELP!!!
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
24
Don't you think that if there was a higher and better use that the market would have already moved in that direction? Do the used car dealers own those lots or do they ground lease? Obviously, CVS is a higher payer that Bob's auto. Just something to think about.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
easy.. if you want to segregate these differing varieties of commercial uses, then create a new commercial designation that allows used/new car lots to be permitted uses and apply that zoning on those properties.

Remove used/new car sales from this prime corridor or make them special uses.

although, this won't immediately remove the used car dealers, this will ensure new development follows your vision.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Gkmo is right. This is an issue that begs for an economic development answer. Let the market drive the uses. If you want a higher-end use, then manipulate the land market in a way that drives those uses to this site.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
Our code only allows for used car dealerships as an accessory use to a new car dealership.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,706
Points
69
When I was PD for a small town in Florida, we were concerned about the growing interest in vehicle-related uses -- and only vehicle-related uses -- from potential commercial developers. We took a proactive stance, and capped the amount of vehicle-related uses.

[tt]
304.9 Commercial diversity along (Street)

304.9.1 Intent
(Town) is increasingly perceived as an ideal location for mechanical commercial uses for several reasons.
* (Town) contains a large portion of the last remaining vacant commercial zoned land along the (Street) corridor.
* The (Street) exit from the Florida’s Turnpike makes the (Town) area attractive for certain retail uses, such as vehicle dealerships, that tend to draw customers from throughout a wide trade area.
* Mechanical commercial uses typically generate little wastewater, so the lack of a sanitary sewer system in (Town) does not render the Town “off limits” to them. The lack of sewer service lowers potential development costs for mechanical commercial uses, making an (Town) location more attractive.

The Town is adjacent to a much larger, blue-collar oriented community, which provides a large customer base for businesses related to vehicle service, construction and various mechanical trades. The majority of commercial uses along (Street) in the neighboring community contain mechanical commercial uses, and that “strip” is growing westward towards (Town).

The greatest concentration of vehicle dealerships and related businesses in (Region) are located along West Colonial Drive about 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of (Town), in a socioeconomically transitional neighborhood with the perception of a high crime rate. Many of those vehicle dealerships may be considering relocation.

The Town Comprehensive Plan encourages the presence of a wide variety of commercial and retail businesses along the (Street) corridor. Mechanical commercial businesses tend to agglomerate, which can “typecast” an area as an “Auto Row,” discourage other types of businesses from considering a location there, and ultimately present a poor impression of the host municipality. The spread of mechanical commercial uses into (Town), a geographically constrained small town, would deny it the opportunity to create a vibrant and diverse retail environment, hurt the Town’s reputation as a desirable community, and harm the distinctive character and sense of place that are integral parts of the Town.

304.9.2 Mechanical commercial use cap

The total linear frontage and land area of all parcels with the following uses must not exceed 25% of the total linear frontage and land area of all C-G and commercial PUD zoned parcels within 1000’ (305 m) of (Street).
* Uses meeting the definition of a mechanical commercial use.
* Convenience stores and supermarkets with gas pumps
* Gas stations, including those with co-branded uses such as restaurants and convenience stores
* Large item sales and rental (Class 1, 2 and 3)
* Vehicle minor repair
* All businesses whose primary function is the sales, rental, servicing, repair, cleaning and modification of motorized vehicles and/or items powered by liquid and gas fuel and fuel cell powered engines; and the sales, service and installation of parts and accessories for such vehicles and items.

For such uses in shopping centers and similar facilities with multiple commercial tenants on one lot, where the area dedicated to the use is not clearly defined, the linear frontage and area of the use is calculated using these formulas:

Use linear frontage on street = linear frontage of use in building × (linear frontage of lot ⁄ linear frontage of building)

Use land area = gross floor area of use in building × (area of lot ⁄ gross floor area of building)

Example: 200’ wide building on parcel with 300’ of linear frontage on (Street)
100’ used for auto parts sales
100 × (300 / 200) = 150’
[/tt]
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
That is the first time I have seen an ordinance limiting uses based on the economic class of the retail patrons.
 

Vlaude

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
Boiker, I am preparing a report recommending the removal of the zoning classification that permits such uses along the corridor. That is the first step in my opinion. The second is to somehow encourage other such uses. I guess that is what I am interested in, pro-active plans to encourage other uses. I agree changing the comp plan is the place to start.

Dan that is an interesting idea, I'm assuming when you reach the threshold no more auto oriented uses are allowed along the corridor? Was that threshold met when the plan was implemented, virtually making more auto oriented businesses not permited along this corridor? Or was there room for more? Where was the 25% frontage derived from?
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
24
V

shouldn't you be getting some public input, talking to the property owners or something like that before you write some report with a recommendation?
 

Vlaude

Cyburbian
Messages
440
Points
13
GKMO, yes there has already been input and some direction from elected City officials and the Economic Dev. Staff... The question really isn't wages, its an issue of tax base. The reason behind the agglomeration is primarily due to zoning ordinances used in the City during the early 70's which encouraged such uses. The city gains little value from the lots in relationship to its tax base, and in some ways are detriments to this suburban town (aesthetics, code enforcement issues, etc...) Though really separate issues...
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
Cardinal said:
Gkmo is right. This is an issue that begs for an economic development answer. Let the market drive the uses. If you want a higher-end use, then manipulate the land market in a way that drives those uses to this site.
I do have to agree with you, Cardinal. My solution doesn't consider market conditions
 

lowlyplanner

Cyburbian
Messages
69
Points
4
In my city, we tried to get rid of used car dealerships from a section of Main Street, in the historic district. Our ordinance left them as allowed uses, but greatly increased the landscaping standards. Generally, small, marginal used car dealerships tend to go out of business a lot, and a new owner will take over the property and often the inventory as well. If you raise the standards to get an operating permit, you raise the cost of re-opening, and should eventually decrease the number of uses.
 
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