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We'll always remember you, Dutch

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Goodbye, Ronnie

Ronald Reagan, one of the greatest of the Presidents of the United States, passed away today. While some people belittle him, he gave this nation a vision that was far better; far brighter than that of the presidents that followed, and many that came before. He changed the world.

It was sad to see him slip away as he did. If Alzheimer's had not taken him, what more might he have done for this country?

Goodbye, President Reagan.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,699
Points
69
President Ronald Wilson Reagan
1911-2004
Nobody loved America more than him. Rest in peace.



Let's go get some commies!
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
I didn't like Ronald Reagan when he was governor of California. Like most people back in the turbo 60's, you either took one side or another. Everything was presented in black and white....with no middle ground.

Ronald Reagan took strong anti-protester views during those days. If you protested against the Viet Nam War you were not a patriot, you shouldn't be in America. He was not happy with the culture change that was taking place.....hair was getting longer, bell-bottom jeans and tie-dye shirts were normal, loud rock and roll music was blasting.

On the other side, many anti-establishment types considered every policeman a "pig", every business establishment (except their own, of course) a "sell-out", every suit and tie a greedy corporate war-monger.

When he re-surfaced in the early 1980's as president I took a different view. He seemed to have a good understanding of the economic advantage our country had over the Soviet Union.....and he exploited that. Timing also played a role, as Mykail Gorbechev (sic?) came into power in the Soviet Union....and the two became friends and a few years later.....the wall was down, the USSR was quickly becoming "just" Russia, guided missles were being destroyed.

All during those Reagan years as prez he made us feel good about being Americans. He had leadership charisma.....something I had never seen in a president before.....or after. Maybe some of it was the acting training....so be it.

He made me feel good and proud to be an American and as I write this a few tears are hitting my keyboard.

Thank you, Mr. President.

Bear
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
I was having a great discussion about the Gipper over a beer while watching Smarty Jones *throw away* the triple corwn yesterday.

Reagan and GW #1 were the leaders of this country for 1/2 my junior high years, all of high school and college years, and a bit of my post grad years. How can that NOT affect someone? Love him or hate him, he did a hell of a good job as President. The Soviet meltdown would probably have happened sooner or later. He made it happen sooner, and got rid of a lot of nukes before it did.
 
Messages
101
Points
6
Cardinal said:
Ronald Reagan, one of the greatest of the Presidents of the United States, passed away today. While some people belittle him, he gave this nation a vision that was far better; far brighter than that of the presidents that followed, and many that came before. He changed the world.

It was sad to see him slip away as he did. If Alzheimer's had not taken him, what more might he have done for this country?

Goodbye, President Reagan.
While I had almost no political affinity with Ronald Reagan, he was an important political figure in our day, and I am very sad to hear of his departure.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
It was more than acting. He had a vision. I will always remember the words "Mr. Gorbachov, tear down this wall." I was in West Germany when the Berlin Wall came down.

However, because he had been an actor, he left a legacy for our presidency that most people seem to not be aware of. Everyone seems to think it was a bad thing that he had been an actor. But this is the "video age", so to speak. He was always aware of his backdrop and he routinely positioned himself such that whatever photos or film the press got was Grand and was in keeping somehow with his presidential roll. It changed the way presidents get presented to the media and how they get filmed and photographed. They are presented with more dignity and flair, befitting of their role and stature. If you compare pictures and film of presidents that came before him to those that came after, there is a dramatic difference. He is the reason for that difference.

He had the utmost respect for his Office -- his role. He brought a degree of dignity to the White House that has not been replicated since.
 

AubieTurtle

Cyburbian
Messages
894
Points
21
Zoning Goddess said:
I never did like Nancy, but I admire her protecting him to the end.
I think some people aren't able to shine until they find the right niche to show what they are capable of. In Nancy's case, being a society woman brought out the bad parts of her personality while taking care of Ronnie brought out the good side.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
I served the Gipper on two missions and I'll always cherish the memories. I shed a tear when I heard. May God bless Ronald Wilson Reagan and the United States of America. The world is a far better place because he was here. :)

Thanks Ronnie - We'll miss you.
 
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JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,788
Points
61
This speaks volumes -

USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN 76) Ship's Seal

The design of the USS RONALD REAGAN's seal was created entirely by her plankowner crew with historical assistance provided by staff members at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation in Simi Valley, California. Every aspect of the seal has relevance to the President, who, as Mr. Lou Cannon states, "dreamt big dreams and gave back to the world the America he had inside of him."

The red border rings the ship's seal much like the distinctive red rim defines the White House china designed for, and used by, the President and First Lady during their White House years.

Four gold stars represent his 40th presidency and President Reagan's Four Pillars of Freedom - the timeless principles he championed: preserving individual liberty; promoting economic opportunity; advancing global democracy around the world; and instilling national pride. These four pillars guided the President throughout his years of public life and form the core of his lasting legacy.

"Peace Through Strength," was a recurring theme of the President's life in public service. America won The Cold War on this doctrine. The President spoke of its significance in his Radio Address to the Nation on September 24, 1988 when he said: "One thing is certain. if we're to continue to advance world peace and human freedom, America must remain strong. if we have learned anything these last eight years, it's that peace through strength works."

The aircraft carrier, cutting a powerful swath through the sea, is positioned by the west coast representing his two terms as Governor of California and the ship's homeport in the Pacific Fleet. The three aircraft with their patriotic contrails symbolize the three major military operations the President directed during his tenure: Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada/1983); Operation El Dorado Canyon (Libya/1986); and Operation Praying Mantis (Iran/1988). Aircraft carriers played a significant role in these operations.

The view of the globe signifies the President's vision of global democracy and at the center is the United States representing our national pride. "We meant to change a nation, and instead we changed a world."

Colors of red, white and blue dominate the seal reflecting the American flag and the President's love of our flag and our country. President Reagan's fondest hope was for all Americans to "love your country, not for her power or wealth, but for her selflessness and her idealism." The colors signify Americans' "birthright to dream great dreams in this sweet and blessed land, truly the greatest, freest, strongest nation on Earth"

The officers and crew of USS RONALD REAGAN strive to fulfill, promote and defend President Reagan's vision for America.

Taken from: http://www.reagan.navy.mil/index.htm
 
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Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,485
Points
41
I cast my first ever ballot in favor of a president for Ronald Wilson Reagan in 1980 (absentee to boot). Reagan fully understood the value of the Bully Pulpit and his Hollywood experience made him the right man for the job at the right time. I just wish I could get rid of these lingering concerns about Iran-Contra and tripling the national doubt. Ahh, but that was then.

Farewell, Mr. President. {Salute}
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
I was an undergrad in 1980 when Reagan was elected president. It was the first presidential election after I was of voting age. I remember how upset and angry I was that our country elected a right-winger. I wanted to vote for John Anderson; however, I thought that I would be throwing my vote away, so I went with Carter, instead.

I was living in a cooperative house off campus, and will never forget the day that Reagan was shot. One of my housemates said that she hoped he would die. I was not a Reagan fan, not at all. I voted for Mondale in 1984.

Over the next few years, my views changed. I voted for a Republican for the first time in 1988. I now look back at the Reagan years with particular fondness. I'm glad to see the respect being paid to him now. In retrospect, he probably had more influence on world events at the end of the 20th Century than any other American (and, except for the Pope, perhaps any other person anywhere).

Looking back, I wish that I had been more respectful toward him while he was president. I do recall that he was vilified by the mainstream press and hated by the academic elite. I honestly believe that this was not just because he built up defense and opposed worldwide communism, but because he strongly supported traditional moral values. It's interesting that some things never change; our current president is treated much the same way.

RIP, Mr. President. You described America as a "shining city on a hill"; now, I hope you will enjoy a vision of the true paradise.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
While I disagreed with him on just about every fundamental issue, I liked him as a man. He displayed good humor, civility and conviction while president. He was a good leader, a good president, and the country's grandpa for eight years. He accepted his mental and physical deterioration with great grace. May he rest in peace.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
otterpop said:
While I disagreed with him on just about every fundamental issue, I liked him as a man. He displayed good humor, civility and conviction while president. He was a good leader, a good president, and the country's grandpa for eight years. He accepted his mental and physical deterioration with great grace. May he rest in peace.
My sentiments as well.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
I am with Otterpop and NHPlanner. I disagreed with most of his policies but as a person he was great. You could tell that he genuinely liked people.
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
Messages
1,361
Points
23
I'll always respect him for his very instrumental role in the Berlin Wall's coming down.

R.I.P., President Reagan
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,369
Points
29
All you planners are such nice people, But I shed no tears. I remember the Reagan years as a desperate battle against the likes of James Watt, Anne Gorsuch, and other looters of the public domain. I remember them as the times when the militias went public and the (Im)Moral Majority began asserting its "right" to tell Americans how to think and act. The mischief we see now was bred in the '80's.

The fact that the current administration is more successful in implementing all of the same policies may be reinforcing my view, but counting Reagan as a "great" president makes my blood pressure leap and bile come up in my throat. I don't really know what the man himself thought about what was done on his watch. Maybe he really didn't know, but at the best his geniality was the front for an assault on the American values of civility (however civil he himself may have been), rationality, tolerance, diversity, and good stewardship.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,485
Points
41
[OT]
Lee Nellis said:
<snip> a desperate battle against the likes of James Watt, and other looters of the public domain. <snip>
I saw Watt after his fall from grace at Midway in Chicago. Looked him straight in the eye as he walked along the concourse. Alone, broken and slumped, schlepping his own baggage to catch a peoplexpress flight. Seemed extremely fitting.[/OT]
 

ChevyChaseDC

Cyburbian
Messages
190
Points
7
I, too shed no tears for the legacy of Ronald Reagan. As authoritative and articulate as he was on camera, and as steadfast and unwavering in character as he was, the conservative policies pursued to great levels of success by his administration have bred much of the current structural problems plaguing the United States of today. While most saw a great optimism and undying love of country, I see what was a willing blindness to necessary but unpopular reforms. It was his presidency that spawned the idea that Americans need not make any personal sacrifices for the betterment of their country. It was his presidency that demonized civic and social responsibility once and for all. It was during his presidency that flying the flag from the window of a gas-guzzling vehicle in wartime came to be accepted as an act of patriotic ferver. It was during his presidency that the right wing of the Republican party managed to convince the rest of us that straight-out jingoism was interchangable with patriotism.

I hope his legacy rests in peace along with his body.
 

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
It was a sad weekend...

I do not hide my admiration for the man and the president. And on the weekend of the 60th anniversary of d-day, I felt very humbled by the accomplishments of one and many Americans...

Reagan made us believe in America again. He helped us regain our pride. He ushered in a treaty that actually reduced nuclear arms, but never wavered in his convictions against the "evil empire.". He took the Soviet Union to the "woodshed" and allowed the world to see that communism as a social animal is oppressive. He brought us Alan Greenspan. He cut taxes across the board by 25-percent. He won reelection by the greatest landslide in history. He left office with the highest approval rating of any president before him, and since. He is a great american.

As a side note, I was in his birthplace last fall in Tampico, IL and suggest anyone travelling through the area to visit a small piece of history.
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
It was his presidency that spawned the idea that Americans need not make any personal sacrifices for the betterment of their country. It was his presidency that demonized civic and social responsibility once and for all.
Your comments are curious to me. I am not sure by what basis you make the above assumptions. After all, we are discussing the Reagan Era and not the Clinton Era. I think that Reagan gave us just the opposite of what you have stated. Being from the "Greatest Generation", Reagan demonstrated to me, a Gen X'er that it was the personal sacrifice of his generation and others that bought the freedoms that I enjoy.

Although I was not of military age during a war time, I certainly learned from Reagan and other conservative leaders that civic responsiblity is paramount. One does not have to join the Peace Corps or Americorps (not that there is anything wrong with that) to be civically and socially responsible and engaged.
 
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