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What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

Hceux

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Currently, I'm just starting to read an article on "Locations, Clusters, Compnay Strategy" by Michael E Porter.

...Clusters and knowledge: Local buzz, global pipelines, and the process of knowledge creation by Harald Bathelt, Anders Malmberg, and Peter Maskell.
 
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Jen

Cyburbian
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1,703
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24
Im reading Org theory's favorite canadienne guru Gareth Morgan's Images of Organization. That and an edited version of OT classics by Weber, Taylor, Barnard etc, all are considered landmark and progressive ideas for their time, but jeez o pete b-o-r-i-n-g!
 

FueledByRamen

Cyburbian
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449
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13
"As I Lay Dying"

or did you mean planning related stuff??? well Im about halfway through Jackson's "Crabgrass Frontier" which I have to read for a class...lets just say Ive read better
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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29
None are planning related

Vonnegut's - Time Quake - a weird synopsis of a ten year period in which he questions free will and tells stories of his family
Wil Eisner - Fagin the Jew - a really neat graphic novel, telling the story of oliver twist from fagin's point of view.
Cerebus - Issues 292-294 - the last 10 issues in this indie comic.

A few other comic books
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,078
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33
FueledByRamen said:
"As I Lay Dying"

or did you mean planning related stuff??? well Im about halfway through Jackson's "Crabgrass Frontier" which I have to read for a class...lets just say Ive read better
OMG! Are you insane? Faulkner? Nobody reads Faulkner unless forced to at gunpoint, and then some will still not read his work.

I am now half through "Crazy Horse and Custer," by Stephen Ambrose.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
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2,550
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24
I am reading "Into The Wild" by Jon Krakauer. I loved his "Into Thin Air" book about climbing Everest, so I finally got around to getting this.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
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Cardinal said:
OMG! Are you insane? Faulkner? Nobody reads Faulkner unless forced to at gunpoint, and then some will still not read his work.
I've read this book three times now. It's short, but it takes me a long time because you have to piece together the story. I actually had to keep running notes (who saw what when) as I read it the first time for university. Awesome book!

And I love Faulkner... speak for yourself Cardinal! ;)

Repo Man said:
I am reading "Into The Wild" by Jon Krakauer. I loved his "Into Thin Air" book about climbing Everest, so I finally got around to getting this.
I read them in the other order... "into the wild" first, and then "into thin air". I really enjoyed both of the books (I would like to read into the wild again...) I'd be interested to see what you think of it.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
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1,264
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22
Index this index that

Planning- I am trying to get through Richard Florida's Creative Class... blah blah (another thread.) He was here and spoke to about 1000 folks in downtown Phoenix last week. We defininitely need some more creative planning in PHX. I like some of his ideas, just not sure about his classes and indexes.

Home- Re-reading Clive Cussler Vixen-03.
 

FueledByRamen

Cyburbian
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449
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13
Cardinal said:
OMG! Are you insane? Faulkner? Nobody reads Faulkner unless forced to at gunpoint, and then some will still not read his work.
English 338 Dr James Cox. Yes, I have to read it ;-)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,464
Points
29
Harpers Magazine (October 2003)

Sustainable Architecture: High Tech Housing.

More a photo book-I love fancy, neo-modernist architecture. A lot of nice examples from Europe and Japan.

An Ian Rankin novel-police procedural set in Edinborough, Scotland. Very gloomy-somewhat slow reading, but still one of my favorite writers.

Next Up:

Stephen King-The Dark Tower series (awesome-I think King is actually not that bad a writer)

The newest James Lee Burke Cajun detective series. THIS guy transcends the limitations of the genre. Absolutely awesome writer.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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6,655
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27
"Age and Guile Beats Youth, Innocence and a Bad Haircut." by P.J. O'Rourke. He is one of the few humor writers who is actually laugh-out-loud funny.

Recently read a planning book called "Common Place" that was very good. It was about a charette experience planning Seattle. So many planning-related books are dry as dust and poorly written, so I really have to work to slog through them. This book was interesting and well-written. I read quickly and got a lot from it.

Since I've got a two year old son, I've also read "Winnie the Pooh and the Blackberry Surprise" about a dozen times.
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
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1,046
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23
I wish I could respond better to this thread--3 kids under 6 at home so I do my best.

I just finished Tom Clancy's Teeth of the Tiger (or something like that) by far IMO his worst. Clancy seems to have mailed it in.

Started yesterday Brokaw's Greatest Generation (I know I am a little late to the party on this one)

I also have have that HG Bissinger's Book about Texas High School Football on my nightstand.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,903
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34
Still slogging through Niall Ferguson's "Empire" - interesting, but not subway reading material. I'm also a little disappointed in the narrative - it's not so much a history as a series of anecdotes trying to create parallels between the British Empire of the 18th and 19th Century and the current American "Empire".

Also reading "Action This Day" , which is a history of British codebreaking efforts during WWII. I guess if I had a background in pure mathematics I'd be able to make a little more sense of it...

The above book has caused me to dig out Robert Harris's "Enigma" for a re-read. Also want to find the movie.
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
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880
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21
I found a "James Bond Omnibus" in the new acquisitions section of the public library. It contains Ian Fleming's first three James Bond novels: From Russia with Love, Doctor No, and Goldfinger. It's refreshing to read the novels so many years after having seen the movies. I enjoy the 1950's settings and the references to the world situation at the time. The written James Bond is much more interesting, with more depth and more humanity, as opposed to the movie characterizations. But he's still one bad-ass dude.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
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6,544
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29
My trash novel of the moment is the latest installment in the Kinsey Milhone mysteries: Q is for Quarry. She's sassy!
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,270
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30
10/28/03

Just starting, "The Tin Drum" by Gunter Grass.

Just finished, "The Mill on the Floss" by George Elliot
 

Dharmster

Cyburbian
Messages
440
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13
I'm doing some research on the experience of privatization/withrawal of subsidies on intercity rail passenger travel in Argentina. Reading in Spanish can give you a headache at times (-: but it is fascinating stuff.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,853
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38
I just spent 2 days reading a 2-inch thick notebook about OMB Circulars A-102 and A-110.

Tonight it's back to trash, Janet Evanovich's "Full Speed".
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,449
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24
Finally got a copy of Wekerle & Whitzman's (1995) Safe Cities: Guidelines for Planning, Design and Management so I'm checking that out.
 

Zoning Goddess

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13,853
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SlaveToTheGrind said:
Trying to cure that insomnia, huh?
Sent by boss to a grants class. Next two days: Cost Principles. No problem with insomnia this week! I'm a night owl, but I was so tuckered out last night I was asleep at 9.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
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1,028
Points
22
More neverending list of school reading

Currently dreading myself through this book for an environmental course (Making of the North American environment). Tonight it's "Forcing the Spring: The Transformation of the American Environmental Movement." by Robert Gottlieb.

I'd much rather find out abot Far from Home and read it and learn more about Cairo, IL or even that other book that looks at Cairo and Kent as two doomed American towns. Guess another time...c'est la vie! (that's French for That's life)
 

BiteMeElmo

Cyburbian
Messages
324
Points
11
Looks like I have one of the lowbrow selections of the collection...Black House by Stephen King and Peter Straub. The Talisman is one of my favorite books ever, so I thought I'd give their sequel a shot.
 

biscuit

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3,904
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25
Zoning Goddess said:
I just spent 2 days reading a 2-inch thick notebook about OMB Circulars A-102 and A-110.
Throw in the A-133 and A-122 and you've got yourself a good time orgy of mind numbing government regs. Ain't it fun!
 

Zoning Goddess

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38
biscuit said:
Throw in the A-133 and A-122 and you've got yourself a good time orgy of mind numbing government regs. Ain't it fun!
I only get those if I take the audit class, and no way am I touching that one. Altho I must admit, these circulars are not as mind-numbing as FL statutes.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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29
Just started reading Douglas Coupland's new one "Hey Nostradamus". He has not written a story so good since "microserfs "and "shampoo planet". I almost called in sick today so I could stay home and read it in one sitting.
 

Bangorian

Member
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198
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7
Just finished Michael Moore's new one, "Dude, Where's my country?". That guy makes me proud of being from MI.

Looking for a new one to start. Possibly "Skinny Legs and all".
 

Hceux

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1,028
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22
More school readings

Seems like I never stop reading...does that ring a bell for any of you who were once in universities/colleges?

Anyways, tonight, I'm reading on a bunch of articles written by the prof who is teaching the course. In fact the entire set of readings for the "historical geography" course is done by...guess...the prof who teaches the course! Selling himself as Mr. Wonderful or something...

...here, I go back to a reading on the effects of the railways upon the building of the national identity.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Re: More school readings

Hceux said:
In fact the entire set of readings for the "historical geography" course is done by...guess...the prof who teaches the course! Selling himself as Mr. Wonderful or something...

.
I had one of those moron professors at Univ. of FL, in cartography. He wrote our (unpublished) text. Gave me a bad grade because I never came to class. Such a misogynist.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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Managed to find a copy of the re-released SF classic "The Man Who Folded Himself" by David Gerrold. I'm also reading last Sunday's New York Times - interesting article on the fate of the Manhattan "High Line" for those urban character junkies.
 

Plannerbabs

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The Engineer of Human Souls. Reminds me of Robertson Davies, but with a mid-century Czech bent.
 
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The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown. I SOOOOO hate putting this book down - I stay up way to late reading as it is, and then when I finally put it down to lay down to sleep spend another 1/2 hours just thinking about the book.

My last book was Our Babies, Ourselves, which was one of the much cooler baby books I've slogged through - basically looked at the effect of culture on how various peoples care for infants and the effect of how infants and children are reared upon their adult personality characteristics.

Next up - The Complete Guide to Breastfeeding.
 

tsc

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Downtown said:
The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown. I SOOOOO hate putting this book down - I .
I was going to go get this book and abandon the one I am reading... again.
 

donk

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MaineMan said:
Just finished Michael Moore's new one, "Dude, Where's my country?". That guy makes me proud of being from MI.

Looking for a new one to start. Possibly "Skinny Legs and all".
I liked that one. Right now I am giving "villa incognito" a second try, I stopped reading it the first go round after about 60 pages, could nnot get into it.

Favourite Tom Robbin's book are Jitterbug Perfume (Portions take place in a bicycle shop) or "Even Cowgirls get the Blues"(lesbians) ;) Really favourite is "Jitterbug Perfume" and the idea that gods only exist as long as people believe in them and some other concepts in the book are great.

On Robertson Davies, I despise his works. I was forced to read them in HS, and have gone back to see if being more mature/older would make them any more enjoyable, it has not.

Eagerly awaiting the release of a new Heinlein book recently "found" in the publishers vault.
 

Gedunker

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31
I love naval history and I started Lusitania: An Epic Tragedy by Diana Preston before I began remodelling the kitchen. She's a very breezy writer with outstanding pacing. I hope to be able to get back to it sooner than later.

Mostly I've been reading instructions on installing and wiring can lights and under-cabinet lighting. No good examples of engrish, yet :-D
 
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tsc said:
I was going to go get this book and abandon the one I am reading... again.
Rob's great aunt will send me about 7 books at once, and invariably, i only make it through the entirety of 2 or 3 because i end up abandoning my current read because it just isn't holding my interest (ie: Johnathon Franzen's The Corrections).
 

biscuit

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25
Redneck Nation by Michael Graham

A conservative ex-South Carolinian's interesting opinion that "northern liberals" and many in the rest of the nation have abandoned the lofty ideas of 1960's Liberalism and have co-opted the race obsessed, politically complacent and more redneck tendencies of the south.
This guy is very conservative (but in a more Libertarian way), and rather antagonisic, but very funny.
 

Plannerbabs

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donk said:
I

On Robertson Davies, I despise his works. I was forced to read them in HS, and have gone back to see if being more mature/older would make them any more enjoyable, it has not.

Exactly the reason stuff like that shouldn't be taught in HS. It was years before I could appreciate Steinbeck, thanks to HS. I can understand teachers wanting to give challenging books, fine, but make sure they're books kids can relate to--more universal, or not so esoteric, perhaps. Can't imagine too many HS students getting into an academic novel involving Rabelais etc. Rebel Angels is the only Davies I've really been able to get into so far. Must not be mature enough yet.
 

donk

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Plannerbabs said:
Exactly the reason stuff like that shouldn't be taught in HS. It was years before I could appreciate Steinbeck, thanks to HS. I can understand teachers wanting to give challenging books, fine, but make sure they're books kids can relate to--more universal, or not so esoteric, perhaps.
My favourite book that I was "forced" to read in HS was To Kill a Mockingbird. It is one of the few books I only read once and could remember details from. I have since reread it 4 or 5 times and appreciate it every time.

The best was when I tried to do a book report/independent study on Spider Robinson's "Callahan's Saloon Crosstime Saloon" series and was told that the stories and topic where not suitable. There are a few great Sci Fi classics in the book, the teacher got really mad when I provided an awards and critics list for her to review and explained to her the concept of the books.
 

Plannerbabs

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Yeah, I used to get into trouble in HS all the time for not reading suitable stuff either. Wrote a book report or 2 on On the Road , which didn't go over too well. I loved most that stuff, but I knew a lot of people who hated every minute of every book, whether it was the teen novel of the week or Julius Caesar . Teachers must hate selecting books, knowing that most of the students won't like it/get it no matter what it is, mostly because they're forced to read it.
 
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Plannerbabs said:
Yeah, I used to get into trouble in HS all the time for not reading suitable stuff either.
In 10th grade, we had weekly vocabulary words that we had to use in sentences and I would always amuse my teacher by using them in sentences that belonged in the seamy, bodice ripping, historical romance novels that I devoured.
Example: Vocabulary Word: trepidation

Brianna swooned in trepidation as Lucian began to unlace his codpiece.

Hee.
 

Plannerbabs

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My HS speech teacher actually told me to stop using big words. I goofed my schedule and took it as a senior--in our school it was a freshman class. The teacher wanted me to use words he thought the freshmen could understand. I just told him they could look the words up if they so desired, and continued to pontificate.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Downtown said:
In 10th grade, we had weekly vocabulary words that we had to use in sentences and I would always amuse my teacher by using them in sentences that belonged in the seamy, bodice ripping, historical romance novels that I devoured.
Example: Vocabulary Word: trepidation

Brianna swooned in trepidation as Lucian began to unlace his codpiece.

Hee.
I got a somewhat different reaction in 10th grade when I had to report on a disease. I picked syphillis, complete with color pics of infected organs. The teacher had NO sense of humor.
 

BKM

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Favourite Tom Robbin's book are Jitterbug Perfume (Portions take place in a bicycle shop) or "Even Cowgirls get the Blues"(lesbians) Really favourite is "Jitterbug Perfume" and the idea that gods only exist as long as people believe in them and some other concepts in the book are great.
Neil Gaiman's last novel, American Gods, has a similar theme. The main character basically trapises around the rural parts of the United States with Odin. The interesting twist is that the "old gods" are battling the new "gods" (forces/powers/whatever) spawned by technology, the media, and the like. A somewhat weak ending, imo, but an interesting book overall.

I'll have to check out his Sandman graphics novels, too.
 

otterpop

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donk said:
My favourite book that I was "forced" to read in HS was To Kill a Mockingbird. It is one of the few books I only read once and could remember details from. I have since reread it 4 or 5 times and appreciate it every time.
I think "To Kill A Mockingbird" and "The Caine Mutiny" are books every American should read. Two of the finest examples of American literature. I would also toss in "Life on the Mississippi," because I am a huge Twain fan and I think that is his best book.

"To Kill . . ." is a multi-layered book that works as a tale of childhood, injustice, decency in the face of evil, a slice-of-life, and a parental-child relationship. How much better this world would be if we all were more like Atticus Finch!
 
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