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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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How Buildings Learn: What happens after they're built by Stewart Brand

It bascially is about how the accumlation of age and change can be manifested in buildings and how the changes can be indicators of personal or societal life cycles.

Very interesting!!
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
Points
25
I just finished The Constant Princess by Philippa Gregory and Julie & Julia by Julie Powell, am part way through Vanishing Acts by Jodi Picoult, and have 100 Years of Solitude lined up next.

I'm having trouble finding a copy of The Diamond Age :-{
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
donk said:
Just started "A year in the Merde". As reccomedned by tranplanner. We went and saw a reading by the author.

Finished it, and read the sequel today - merde actually. Pretty good, except the love interest had the same name as an ex and the characters had many of the same conversations that we had. Ouch.
 

Boru

Cyburbian
Messages
235
Points
9
100 years of solitude is one of the most unenjoyable books I have ever read. Not badly written just very boring. However it is a best seller, and has won many awards so some people must enjoy it.

Flann O'Brien (or Myles Na Gopaleen) The 3rd Policeman is a rather bizzarre wee book. I dont remember very much of it apart from the fact that the ideas it put forward regarding atoms had played on my mind before.

I am currently reading "The Vote, how it was won and how it was undermined" by Paul Foot. An historical account of the struggle for the vote in the UK (and Ireland at the time). The book then goes into detail about the various methods used by the Government to restrict voting (in the Uk) once universal suffrage had been granted. its written from a very socialist point of view, but I'm enjoying it immensely.

Spent yesterday re-reading "a confederacy of dunces" for the umpteenth time. My mind needed a rest from the thesis work.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
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33
Right now, I have about 4 books going at once.

-I am reading a collection of short stories by Dostoevsky (sp?), trying to get a taste of his writing before I dive into something longer written by him.

-I have begun to revisit some of the required reading in High School, so that first installment is actually reading Orwell's 1984. Pretty good so far (again, for the first time.)

-I have been skimming through numerous cycling maintenance books, including Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance, whilst on my way to building up the frame I bought from The District.:)

-Last night, I was bored, nothing worth watching on TV (there was a show about apocolyptic literature on the History Channel that held a little interest from me) So i browsed the book shelf and picked up (for the third time) Ghost Rider by my favorite musician, drummer and lyricist Neil Peart (as seen on Z's avatar);). This book is about a motorcycle trip he took to gain perspective on his life and direction (and to stay alive) after his daughter and wife died tragically ten mo0nths apart from eachother. Ghost Rider not only has beautiful descriptions of many places in North America, but it also highlights the healing process travel had brought to Peart. A good read for anyone regardless of them being a fan of Rush's music or not. I picked it up last night for his writing about his time in Belize, but ended up reading 100 pages from the beginning prior to sleepytime.

I have also begun a list of books to read as mentioned in books I am reading now. I would like to try and branch out to see what influences the writers that I like reading.

I sometimes will end up having about 4-5 books "in process" at once. (Sounds like a thread topic, please withhold personal info for the moment);)
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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Now reading Orson Scott Caird's "Treason". So far pretty good, does not appear as if it is going to be one of his books I dislike.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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mendelman said:
How Buildings Learn: What happens after they're built by Stewart Brand

It bascially is about how the accumlation of age and change can be manifested in buildings and how the changes can be indicators of personal or societal life cycles.

Very interesting!!
It is interesting. I am about 3/4 through it now. Though, it is not exactly what I thought it was going to be, because one rather large chapter rants against the current Architecture modus operandi.

On deck:
Politics of Place: a History of Zoning in Chicago - should be interesting and is actually one of first historical texts to specifically address zoning as a major component of a place's development history.
 

The Irish One

Member
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2,266
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25
I'm going to read Marcus J. Borg and John Dominic Crossan's new book The Last Week A Day-by-Day Account of Jesus’s Final Week in Jerusalem
http://www.johndcrossan.com/TheLastWeek.html
John Crossan's writing's attempt to explain the life of Christ from a social, cultural, historical, anthropological perspective. While I'm not of the Christian faith, I am of Christiandome and to not recognize the vast cultural influences religion has in every faucet of my being is irresponsible to ignore. I've always struggled with people beleiving in acts of man and god that defy the laws of physics. It was my main beef with the church (generally speaking) in my teenage years while nurturing my theology. I still struggled with it in my twenties but finally found a peace without anger towards religion. John Crossan's writings have played a huge part in this process for which I'm deeply grateful and quite frankly I feel indebted. I attend a Unitarian Universalist church from time to time and draw from John Crossan's works to help guide myself into and through a life, trying to be spiritually enriching.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Most recently, I have read "The Curious Incident of a Dog" by Mark Haddon, which really gives you a perspective of what it may be like to be autistic.

And now, I'm currently reading "I didn't hear the Dragon Roar" by Frances M. Parsons, which is about a deaf woman's travel through China.

Oh, last night, I breezed through a graphic novel called "Paul moves out" by Michel Rabagliati.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,937
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39
"A Writer at War: Vasily Grossman with the Red Army 1941-1945", edited and translated by Antony Beevor and Luba Vinogradova.

His descriptions of the extermination camps at Treblinka are very painful to read.

Oh, and yes - I do occassionaly read books that aren't about World War II in case you were wondering :-$
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,287
Points
35
Finished "Why do Men Have Nipples: Questions You Would Only Ask Your Doctor After 3 Martinis" last night - very good, light read. A doctor and a satirist answer questions about our body (and its functions) in a humorous way.
Started "Assisination Vacation" over the weekend. The writer is a history/presidential assisination junky, and this book chronicles some of her travels. Specifically she visits sites somehow connected (even very remote - like the home studio of the artist that created the Lincoln MMemorial statue) to a president that was killed. I'm only about 1/3 into it, and it's a hoot.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,300
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44
1001 Golf Holes You Must Play Before You Die. Jeff Barr, general editor. (Sadly, I haven't played many, so I have some work to do.)
 

Zoning Goddess

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Just finished Marley and Me: Life with the World's Worst Dog (on the non-fiction best-seller list). Verry funny book, but of course with a sad ending.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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6,655
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28
I am now reading "A Catastrophe of Success" - a biography of Frank Capra, director of some of my favorite movies. It is a very long book and Capra seems like it was kind of a egocentric jerk. Too much on his manuevering in the film industry and not enough on the movies and the people. C'est la vie. I made a promise to myself to finish a book after I start it. I will keep slogging on.
 

noottamevas

Cyburbian
Messages
2,093
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22
Whose Yur Planner said:
The new Book of Lists. I used to read them when I was a kid. Once a geek, always a geek.:r:
If you can find one from the 1980's I recommend rereading it. Many of the lists were "In 20 years....." Now that 20 years have gone by, its interesting to see how close their estimates were.

How often do they come out with those?
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,282
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30
Hmmm Book Idea.....

RichmondJake said:
1001 Golf Holes You Must Play Before You Die. Jeff Barr, general editor. (Sadly, I haven't played many, so I have some work to do.)

How about a book called "1001 glasses of wine you must drink before you die".....that would be cool. :p
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,448
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25
JNL said:
I'm having trouble finding a copy of The Diamond Age{
Found it. Reading it. Loving it! :-D

I like how when you're reading Neal Stephenson's books, just when you think you're getting a handle on the characters and what's going on, he throws in a curve ball, another layer of crazy intensity, and you never really know where it's going next! I also enjoy the way he mixes super-cool futuristic new technology with a few old-fashioned twists.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
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10,199
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52
it has been out for awhile but i'm currently reading Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss. i like it. Ms. Truss makes grammar and punctuation fun to learn about.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
JNL said:
Found it. Reading it. Loving it! :-D

I like how when you're reading Neal Stephenson's books, just when you think you're getting a handle on the characters and what's going on, he throws in a curve ball, another layer of crazy intensity, and you never really know where it's going next! I also enjoy the way he mixes super-cool futuristic new technology with a few old-fashioned twists.

Me too. I'm extremely slow in getting through this rather awesome book.

A couple of problems:

1 Too much internet time

2. Too many architecture books I keep perusing instead.

3. Also reading the Wraethlu series of novels.

4. Too lazy/stubborn/cheap to go buy the %$#@# reading glasses I need to comfortably read printed text. :-$

I MUST finish this book. It is indeed a fascinating one.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
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40
Just finished Steve Berry's "The Templar Legacy"; another in the Da Vinci Code vein, but a fun, fast read.

Uh oh, time for another trip to the library!:)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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CosmicMojo said:
Get them at the Dollar Store!:)

I do want the prescription lenses, though, not just magnifying glasses. I have a fairly significant astigmatism that complicates the near sightedness my prescription lenses really focus on. Maybe I just need the See Clearly Method (lol)
 

CosmicMojo

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543
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BKM said:
I do want the prescription lenses, though, not just magnifying glasses. I have a fairly significant astigmatism that complicates the near sightedness my prescription lenses really focus on. Maybe I just need the See Clearly Method (lol)
I need a prescription too probably, I'm just trying to hold that off as long as possible and the over-the-counter magnifiers are doing the job for now. I just wanted you to know they can be had for a buck at the dollar store instead of $20 at the drugstore. Not as many style choices, of course.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,295
Points
24
I just got Kunstler's new book, "The Long Emergency". We've had threads on oil depletion and Kunstler before on Cyburbia. Now, for your convenience, they're joined between two covers!
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
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30
3-27-06

Finished - Deception Point by Brown
Starting - Love in the time of Cholorea by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (the Great Gabo)

I find the Great Gabo's writing style very engaging and humorous. Has anyone read A Thousand Years of Solitude?
 

Planner Hottie

Cyburbian
Messages
110
Points
6
Budgie said:
Starting - Love in the time of Cholorea by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (the Great Gabo)

I find the Great Gabo's writing style very engaging and humorous. Has anyone read A Thousand Years of Solitude?

I love his books and short stories too. But I had not adopted a pet name for him yet!
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
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Planner Hottie said:
But I had not adopted a pet name for him yet!

I didn't come up with that name. It is my understanding that he is known as the Great Gabo throughout the Spanish speaking world. I think he won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1982..... or sometime around then.
 

Planner Hottie

Cyburbian
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110
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6
Budgie said:
I didn't come up with that name. It is my understanding that he is known as the Great Gabo throughout the Spanish speaking world. I think he won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1982..... or sometime around then.

I figured something like that was the case. I was just poking fun for no good reason at all. :)

I thought they had made a movie of one of his stories, but I couldn't find any reference. I think Love in the Time of Cholera would make a lovely film.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
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A Gathering of Old Men-Ernest Gaines...forced reading by evil English Lit prof who is a whole 25 years old. It's about a black sharecropper murdering his white landowner in Louisiana.

The Monk that Sold His Ferrari......given to me and it's actually pretty interesting.

Here is a link To Gabo's films http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0305781/
 
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Maister

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Got the Chronicles of Narnia (all 7 books in one paperback edition) for Xmas. Time to read 'em and see what all the hoopla is about.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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From the AP Wire:

Monty Python Actor's Book to Be Required
LONDON -- A travel book written by a former Monty Python comedian will become required reading in high school geography classes, Britain's school minister said Thursday, as the government seeks to boost interest in geography.

"Himalaya" follows Michael Palin's 1,800-mile, six-month trek through India, Pakistan and China in 2003 and 2004.

Palin -- known for the catch phrase "No one expects the Spanish Inquisition!" on the cult British TV comedy series "Monty Python's Flying Circus" -- has filmed seven travel documentaries, including several for the British Broadcasting Corp.

"You can travel the seas, poles and deserts and see nothing," said the 52-year-old actor-turned-world traveler. "To really understand the world, you need to get under the skin of the people and places. In other words, learn about geography. I can't imagine a subject more relevant in schools."

The announcement by School Minister Lord Adonis follows the release of a report from the government's education watchdog, the Office for Standards in Education, which said that geography was the worst taught subject in British schools.

Inspectors said high school geography teachers focus too much on drilling facts into students, rather than sparking their interest in other countries and cultures.

Has anybody read "Himalaya" ?
Nice endorsement, has me interested in his book now.
Has anybody seen his travel documentaries ?
 

Maister

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JNA said:
From the AP Wire:

Monty Python Actor's Book to Be Required


Has anybody read "Himalaya" ?
Nice endorsement, has me interested in his book now.
Has anybody seen his travel documentaries ?
I saw "Around the World in 80 Days", "Pole to Pole" and "Sahara". Mr. Palin is a man after my own heart and seems to enjoy traveling in much the same way as I do. He intersperses observations about human cultures with humor and likes to focus on the quirky and unusual aspects of the places he visits (and means of travel). I highly recommend any of the travelogues he's made and would be quite interested in reading "Himalaya".
 

sisterceleste

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
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22
Zoning Goddess said:
Just finished Steve Berry's "The Templar Legacy"; another in the Da Vinci Code vein, but a fun, fast read.
yeah, I'm reading that now. Just picked it up from the library late this week.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
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40
New book by my favorite author, Elizabeth Peters: Tomb of the Golden Bird. Got a good start on it out by RJ's pool yesterday.
 

Suzan

Cyburbian
Messages
30
Points
2
The following, in various stages of completion:

Brave New Neighborhoods: Margaret Kohn
The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon: Richard Zimler
Labyrinths - Jorge Luis Borges
Death & Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacobs
The Dante Club - Matthew Pearl
The Devil in Love - Jacques Cazotte
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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26,673
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70
"The President's Assassin" by Brian Haig is a good intrigue/action read.

Want to read his "Man in the Middle"
 
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CosmicMojo

Member
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543
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16
I just finished "Never Let me Go" by Kazuo Ishiguro--I could not put it down. I hate relaying any of the plot, 'cause it's the gradual unfolding of what's going on, but it's a quietly disturbing examination of medical ethics? I hate spoilers. I think it was shortlisted for the Booker?
 
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7,628
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I recently began reading "GIS, Spatial Analysis, and Modeling" (um, I think that's the title. Will correct later if I am misremembering it.)
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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40
"Oh My Stars" by Lorna Landvik. About a girl in the '30's who loses her arm in an industrial accident and is on her way cross-country to jump off the Golden Gate Bridge. Ends up in a bus accident and becomes a manager for a band. Sounds strange, I know, but very entertaining. I pick a lot of stuff off the new release shelf at the library and some are hits, some misses.
 

njm

Cyburbian
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322
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11
Suzan said:
Death & Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacobs

Eventually I'll put out the cash for that one...

Just finished War of the Worlds and a very dry Open Spaces by August Heckscher

I'm reading a Pearl S. Buck book I picked up for 0.99 @ goodwill and The Geography of Nowhere by Kunstler
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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I bought Cussler's "Trojan Odyssey" at Sam's Club yesterday for $5. I hope that's a good deal. It's on my list.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
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Last night, I started reading "Eats, Shoots and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation" by Lynne Trusse. I know many people have already it, but I just got a hold of it from the public library after being on a waiting list for a while.
 
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