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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
After being thoroughly put off of Orson Scott Caird by the first book in the Alvin Maker series, I am rereading one of my favourite books Vonnegut's - Jailbird.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,531
Points
60
State of Fear - Micheal Crichton

then

Bluebeard - Kurt Vonnegut
 

Powered by Sweat

Cyburbian
Messages
53
Points
4
I just finished "A Million Little Pieces". A controversial book due to the Biography/Fiction debate, but a powerful book, that will probably really open your eyes.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Taking a break from "Eats, Shoots and Leaves" and reading "Coldplay: Look at the Stars" by Gary Spivack.

I so enjoyed reading the first eight chapters of it as I was enjoying Coldplay's Parachutes CD. Reading about Coldplay experience with this cd and listening to it was quite splendid.

Can't wait to read more of it, but schoolwork is keeping me from doing so for another five days.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
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Moderator
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13,317
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55
my book club is reading the glass castle right now - it's very well written but for some reason, i get weird dreams when I read it before falling asleep -
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
Messages
431
Points
13
I'm re-reading "In Search of the Old Ones" by David Roberts to get ready for a trip to southeast Utah and hike around the Cedar Mesa/Grand Gulch area.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
This morning I started reading "In Praise of Slow: How a Worldwide Movement is Challenging the Cult of Speed" by Carl Honoré and have read two chapters so far. I'm enjoying it. Has anyone else read this? And if so, have you changed the way you've been living because of it?

Still, making my way through "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" by Lynne Trusse.

Finished that book on Coldplay and hope to read it again soon! :-D
 

psylo

Cyburbian
Messages
186
Points
7
I just started reading "Reds: McCarthyism in Twentieth-Century America" by Ted Morgan. Excellent history on that period and the little known details of this time. It's turning out to be a interesting read.
 
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7,628
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29
I started reading Fab yesterday. MUCH quicker read than "GIS, Spatial Analysis and Modeling" (or whatever the name of that book is that I am still slowly trudging through -- interesting but hard material).

Fab is about personal fabrication -- "the wave of the future". It's a cool book.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
Points
25
I just finished 'The Pursuit of Happiness' by Dougals Kennedy, which I really enjoyed. It's about a couple who connect through a chance meeting in 1945 and fall in love instantly and then he is shipped off to cover post-war clean-up the next day (he is a journalist), and then how their lives are entwined after they meet up years later. I learnt a lot about how people with connections to the Communist Party were hunted down by HUAC in the 50s 8-! :-o
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Just finished another book by Lorna Landvik (mentioned another previously). Very fun "general" fiction; quirky characters, happy, sad, etc. This one was "Patty Jane's House of Curls" (not stupid as the title suggests).
 

Boru

Cyburbian
Messages
235
Points
9
I am reading a book called "That they might face the rising sun" by an Irish writer called John McGahern. It was published under the title of "By the lake" in the US.

Very descriptive writer. Bought the book for my Mother. She told me she had already read it so I took it home and started it.

I started it at 11.00 last night. I read it until 4.30 in the morning and was late for work.:r:

Slow moving. Fantastic turn of phrase. reminds me of my older country relations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McGahern
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
I've been much more productive with my reading lately.

I've finished reading:

1. In Praise of Slow by Carl Honoré
2. Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynn Trusse
3. Who Moved my Cheese? by Spencer Johnson

And, currently reading a depressing one, but I'm still interested in the topic. It's In Plain Sight: Reflections on Life in Downtown Eastside Vancouver, edited by Leslie Robertson and Dara Culhane. It's a collection of stories told by women who lives on the streets in Downtown Eastside, the poorest postal code region in Canada known for its high number and concentration of homeless people, its drug activities, its prostitution activities, and its stark differences from the rest of the city.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,287
Points
35
Last night I finished the Narnia collection. I hadn't read them since high school, so it was a re-discovery. Stayed up a bit late to do it, so I'm bummed this morning.

Next up: don't know. Need a trip to the bookstore!
 

KristenAnna

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
I'm in the middle of Disappointment With God by Philip Yancey. Good book! I'm also reading The Secret Life of Bees. I'm planning on reading The Lord of the Rings this summer, as well.
 

hilldweller

Cyburbian
Messages
3,863
Points
23
Currently reading The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida and the Politics of Paradise. I think this is one of the best books I've ever read about environmental issues and I highly recommend it.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
KristenAnna said:
I'm also reading The Secret Life of Bees.
I really enjoyed The Secret Life of Bees, but I found her other novel, The Mermaid Chair, harder to get into. I hear Bees is being made in to a movie, though.
 

Audrey

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
Shadow Divers

Grey Seas Under & The Serpents Coil, both great sea salvage tug books by Farley Mowett
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Just finished

Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson -first cyber punk book I've read that I enjoyed. It has some interesting descriptions of cities. jaws might like it for the ideas of private cities in it.
Currently reading Hyperion - Dan Simmons
Next in line is Douglas Coupland's J-pod (going to see him tuesday night, and hopefully get it signed)

After that there are a few holocaust memoirs and graphic novels that look promising.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
While not completely on topic, this seems to be teh best place to put it.

I just introduced a fellow cyburbian to my geek world of book readings and the fanboy culture of signings.

If you are looking for a good book to read that won't change your life, but will make you laugh check out j-pod by Douglas Coupland. The reading was really good as is the book, only 50 pages left of a 450 page book I bought on Sunday.
 

geobandito

Cyburbian
Messages
509
Points
16
donk said:
I just introduced a fellow cyburbian to my geek world of book readings and the fanboy culture of signings.
I believe that would be me. :) It was my first reading and it was fun. If I weren't such a tightwad and actually bought books, I guess I could participate. I don't suppose they sign library books. ;)
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44
I received some reading material for this weekend by the pool: "The Four Supreme Court Land-Use Decisions of 2005: Separating Fact from Fiction"

PAS Report #535

:r: 8-! x|
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,287
Points
35
I picked up "Catherine de Medici" at B&N over the weekend. Have finished maybe a quarter of it, and it's pretty darn good. Granted, I'm a history buff - this isn't everyone's cup of tea.

I also debated picking up Da Vinci Code, but passed. I've heard so much about it from friends and the press (for the movie) that I think I know what it says. Besides, I don't think the author needs any more $$$. Maybe I'll check it out of the library some distant day in the future.
 

burnham follower

Cyburbian
Messages
160
Points
7
I've been trying to read "The End of Poverty" for a few months now but keep on picking up other things (most notably for you all probably is Geo of Nowhere). Has anyone else read or tried reading that and found it...boring?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,673
Points
70
Has anybody read "Sundown Towns" by James W. Loewen ?
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
By chance, I read an entire book today. I quite enjoyed it and I think some of you would be interested in it. Its title is what may interest you!

Title: The Changing Face of America.
Author: Peter C. Jones.

It's a book that reflect on the evolution of the American landscape from the east coast to the west coast from various perspectives: "open spaces", "natural wonders", "rivers", "farms", "shorelines", "highways and byways", "the industrial landscape", "sprawl", and "skylines". These are the nine chapters that the book consists of.

Interspered with the text is a collection of rare photos taken from the 1800s through 1980s. (The book was published in 1991).

Anyways, it was a very interesting reading.

Next on the list are two Mike Davis books that I picked up at the library: Do you recommend either of these books? 1. Prisoners of the American Dream and 2. Fire in the Hearth.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
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Moderator
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12,634
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44
An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore.....very interesting, lots of great pics and data.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Recently finished reading a book that turned out much more interesting than I expected: "The Adonis Complex : How to Identify, Treat and Prevent Body Obsession in Men and Boys" by Harrison G. Pope, Katherine A. Phillips, and Roberto Olivardia.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
I am reading "Red Harvest", by Dashiell Hammett, which the creator of "Deadwood" said was part of his inspiration for the HBO series. Hammett wrote the book about his expereinces as a Pinkerton in Butte, MT.

Also "A Salty Piece of Land," by Jimmy Buffett. Required reading for a Parrothead.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
Messages
335
Points
11
luckless pedestrian said:
my book club is now starting "one Thousand White Women" by Jim Fergus

I really liked that one...

if you enjoy it, you might like "Dalva" by jim harrison. Different style and different type of story, but similar subject matter. And better, I think.

In the middle of "Who killed Daniel Pearl" by french superstar philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy. Fantastic style. Just finished "American Vertigo" by the same author- a frenchman following in the footsteps of Toqueville 200 years later. I thought it was great.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
33
James A. Michener's CENTENNIAL. An 1100 page historical piction odyssey about that history and occurances of a fictional town set about 20 miles east of my current Colorado town.
Pretty good so far, and certainly the longest book I have read. I have about 300 pages to go, and hopefully will wrap it up soon.

Next, I think I will continue with Michener and reread THE BRIDGE AT ANDAU, an anthology of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. Since it has been 50 years and I am of Hungarian decent and all... :-|
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
mendelman said:
"Going Postal" by Terry Pratchett

Is it good, I have always been intrigued by his books, but never picked one up?

I am reading diamond world by neal stephenson and getting ready to read "killdozer and other stories" by theodore sturgeon.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,937
Points
39
Just finished "1776" by David McCollugh. Very good. Now starting into "Life and Fate" by Vassily Grossman.
 

luckless pedestrian

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13,317
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55
vaughan said:
I really liked that one...

if you enjoy it, you might like "Dalva" by jim harrison. Different style and different type of story, but similar subject matter. And better, I think.

hey, thanks!
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
At a friend's cottage over the Canada Day long weekend, I read an entire book in two days in the sun. What a luxury it was to do this!

The book: So B. It by Sarah Weeks

It's about how a young girl of a mother who is mentally disabled is perplexed by one of the 23 words that her mother frequently says and how she is determined to figure out what is the meaning of that word that cannot be found in the English dictionary.

Quite an interesting and easy-reading book that also gets you thinking about the kind of love you can get from people who are mentally disabled.

P.S. At the present time, I cannot think of the more politically correct word for "mentally disabled". Please be not offended by this term. (And, do let me know if there is a more acceptable term.)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
Wraethlu

I am plowing my way, slowly, through the first three books of the Wreathlu trilogy, by Storm Constantine. Not my usual sci fi, which is more of a standard guy/nerd type. Little "action" per se-just lots of character development and "relationships."

The basic idea: a mutation has resulted in a new species of trans-human, the hermaphrodite Wraethlu, which proceed to steadily (and sometimes violently) replace the decadent, declining human race. The sexual ambiuities are interesting and intriguing, althouhg a little slow going.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
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40
"The Big Bamboo" by Tim Dorsey. I've mentioned him before, FL writer in the vein of Dave Barry or Carl Hiaasen, very funny.

How can you not love:

" The Buick reached the causeway on the west end of the span, featuring a coliform beach popular among sh*tkickers and sub-sh*tkickers genetically predisposed to Golden Flake chips, lapsed insurance, bottle rockets and Trans Ams with unrepaired fender damage." ??
 

Gedunker

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47
Just breezed through Hornfischer's Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors about the Battle Off Samar. The guy writes history like Grisham writes novels. Excellent.

Slogging through Gettysburg July 1. Although many of the battle maps are the best I've seen, they still leave something to be desired (namely, more accurate depictions of topography).
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,702
Points
26
On my reading shelf I have Flannery O'Connor The Complete Stories a collection of short fiction stories including A Good Man is Hard to Find, Good Country People and many others.

Also on the eleventh book in O'Brian's Aubrey/ Maturin Master and Commander series. I can't seem to put these books down. And to get another taste of the nautical life in the Royal navy I have picked up Forresters Mr Midshipman Hornblower.
 

michaelskis

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20,877
Points
57
Recent books *Books on CD while commuting

Theodore Rex
Longitudes and Attitudes
Grace and Power, the lives of the Kennedy’s
The Lexis and the Olive Tree
Rise, Let Us Be On Our Way

I love history books, non-fiction, and biographies.
 

luckless pedestrian

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michaelskis said:
I love history books, non-fiction, and biographies.

A couple of months ago I read Manunt - it's the true story of the 12 day chase for Booth after he shot Lincoln - it's a great read if you need a new book!
 
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