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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,900
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23
Cesar's Way - the Dog Whisperer....trying to deal with my still distructive mutt.

Crash Out- story of Sing Sing's worst breakout. Really good book with a lot of interesting history of NYC gangs.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
This morning, I just finished reading a fantastic graphic novel. It's Pedro and Me: Friendship, Loss, and What I Learned by Judd Winick.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,195
Points
60
luckless pedestrian said:
A couple of months ago I read Manunt - it's the true story of the 12 day chase for Booth after he shot Lincoln - it's a great read if you need a new book!
That does sound good. I will have to look for it!
 
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1,580
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21
Just finished: There is a Season by Patrick Lane

Just started: The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
Messages
335
Points
11
tsc said:
Cesar's Way - the Dog Whisperer....trying to deal with my still distructive mutt.

Crash Out- story of Sing Sing's worst breakout. Really good book with a lot of interesting history of NYC gangs.


I just read the Malcom Gladwell article on cesar the dog whisperer in the New Yorker a few months ago- unbelievable! And the photo of him surrounded by 10 or so dogs going ballistic was incredible!
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,900
Points
23
vaughan said:
I just read the Malcom Gladwell article on cesar the dog whisperer in the New Yorker a few months ago- unbelievable! And the photo of him surrounded by 10 or so dogs going ballistic was incredible!


Well...I must say using his methods for just one week we have made good progress with our pup who suffers from separation anxiety.
 

Dashboard

Cyburbian
Messages
86
Points
4
I'm currently finishing up "A Pirate Looks at Fifty" by Jimmy Buffett...

The next book I will be starting is "Fantasy Land" by Sam Walker...Walker is a Senior Baseball writer from the Wall Street Journal who basically quits his job for a year to run a fantasy baseball team...he hires a research assistant and a NASA scientist to help him try to beat the "experts." If you are in to fantasy sports, I've heard this book is awesome.
 

jfc921

Member
Messages
30
Points
2
Above and Beyond, an APA book that shows lots of oblique aerials of cities and towns in VT, illustrating how various development patterns fit or don't fit into the overall landscape of a community. Includes stuff about how local regs create the idiot patterns we now suffer with - cul-de-sac city, unconnected big boxes, etc. You know the stuff. I got the book to see what I could pick out to illustrate this stuff to my Planning Board, who still think 30 foot wide streets with sidewalks on both sides are critical for public safety in subdivisions of 4 (yes, four) houses or more. "It's for all the parties!" "It's for the snow banks!" Sheesh. Never mind that the only public road in town that is 30' or more is the limited access highway...

Anyway, it's a good book - I'd recommend it to anyone living in a small town or rural area. They make some excellent points and the photo comparisons are stunning.
 

brianchow

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
Hi,

I have just finished Fast Food Nation.

I am currently reading Knock 'em Dead: The Ultimate Job Seeker's Guide 2006 and magazines I have borrowed from the local library.
 

burnham follower

Cyburbian
Messages
160
Points
7
I just knocked off "How Soccer Explains the World" and am now reading "Sex, Drugs and CoCo Puffs". I loves the soccer book, i'm back and forth on Sex, Drugs and Coco Puffs (the book, not the stuff, I mean i love coco puffs). The author, Chuck Klosterman, seems a little back and forth and generally inconsistant in his preferences. It's also obvious that he wrote this just before bed as the cover advertises
 

kbunker

Member
Messages
9
Points
0
What I'm reading

Autobiography of Muhammad Ali
Don Quixote (for my fall studio w/Carl Steinitz)
This Land by Anthony Flint
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
Points
30
Finished - The Collective Tales of Nickolai Gogol - Gogol

Reading - Cities and the Wealth of Nations - Jacobs

On the Shelf - East of Eden - Stienbeck.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,195
Points
60
Freakonomics: Thus far, very good and surprising. Not sure that I buy into all the conclusions of cause and effect for things, but interesting none the less.
 
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mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,905
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60
Galapagos by Kurt Vonnegut - it's a pretty good one.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,552
Points
26
I'm currently reading Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States by Kenneth T. Jackson. Its a fairly comprehensive look into the history of suburbanization in the United States. Jackson looks at the suburban movement throughout history and delves into cultural, economic, and governmental reasons as to why it has flourished in the U.S.
 
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7,628
Points
29
"Reading Lolita in Tehran". I think that was something someone here may have mentioned previously in this thread. I happened to have a gift card for a book store recently and that was one of the books I picked up with it.
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
29
Just picked up 31 Days from the library. It's about the first 31 days after Ford took over for Nixon and supposedly how it shaped the government we have today. It's ok so far. Very interesting how Rumsfeld, Cheney, and Bush, Sr. were major players.
 

luckless pedestrian

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Michele Zone said:
"Reading Lolita in Tehran". I think that was something someone here may have mentioned previously in this thread. I happened to have a gift card for a book store recently and that was one of the books I picked up with it.

yes, my book club read that - I liked it :)
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,777
Points
24
I only get to read while nursing, so I am in the process of reading "One for the Money" by Janet Evanovich. What a fun series.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,304
Points
53
i'm currently reading Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach. it is a really interesting book and the author has a great sense of humor. the humor brings some levity to the subject matter.

3 thumbs up.
 
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7,628
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29
luckless pedestrian said:
yes, my book club read that - I liked it :)
Whenever it was mentioned, I had looked it up online and tripped across a portion of the first chapter online. It sounded intriguing. So, here I am, a few months later. :)
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
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22
MZ, I just got that book from the local library! I hope it's a good read.

Also from the library, I picked up another graphic novels as well as two books. I'll report them once I actually start reading them.

Recently, I finished reading two "geography/planning" books that I thought I'd share with you Cyburbians.

1. New City by John Lorinc. It focuses on the present state and the potential future of Canadian cities. Lorinc explores a wide range of issues that various sub-populations are experiencing and will likely undergo. Lorinc also proposes some solutions to problems that Canadian cities are facing.

Beware - this book can get you to fall in love with Vancouver. It did just that for me. It seems Vancouver has lots going for it!

2. Room for Thought: rethinking home and community designs by Avi Friedman. Although Avi is also Canadian, I believe much of what he says in his book is also applicalbe to other countries, such as USA.

This book consists of over twenty short easy-reading, but intelluctually stimulating essays about how design affects life and how the small and large things that come out of our urban design and home design affects the level of enjoyments in our homes and communities. Some of the topics he explores are: the obsession with McMansion homes, the increasing size of homes when family sizes are shrinking, innovations in recycling materials for housing materials, and the value of flexible designs in homes.
 
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One of the books I picked up today and began reading is called "Information Architects". Lots of beautiful and interesting graphics, so it's turning into something of a quick read because that reduces the amount of text. It reminds me of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" in that both books make lots of references to other books in a way which makes me feel like I should read some of those books as well. :-\
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
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22
Michele Zone said:
It reminds me of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" in that both books make lots of references to other books in a way which makes me feel like I should read some of those books as well. :-\

MZ, oh, does that mean I should read the other books before I read "Reading Lolita in Tehran"? If so, could you share the names of these books?

As for other books that I'm currently reading, they are:

1. The Architecture of John Lautner by Alan Hess
2. The Coma by Alex Garland
 
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Hceux said:
MZ, oh, does that mean I should read the other books before I read "Reading Lolita in Tehran"? If so, could you share the names of these books?
I don't think it is absolutely necessary but I am considering reading those books and then going back to re-read it some day. The author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" is a professor of English Literature. Each section of the book is named for a book or an author and refers often to whichever book or author it is named for. It uses the plots of those books as a kind of metaphor for what was going on in her life during various stages (the book itself is a kind of memoir).

The first section is called "Lolita" and refers over and over to the themes in that book. As someone who has studied women's issues and other things she touches on a quite a bit, I had no trouble following her points, even without ever having read "Lolita". But if you have difficulty following her points, you might find it enriching to read "Lolita".

The second section is called "Gatsby". Again, I have not read "The Great Gatsby". I don't think I 'missed' anything in this book by not having that background but I suspect I would find it enriching to be more familiar with the story she refers to.

The third section is called "James" -- the last name of an author. The book most often referred to so far is called "Daisy Miller". I am in the midst of this section.

You could flip through the rest of the book and figure out the main theme of each of the sections and decide if you want to read some of these classics of English Literature as "background". Having used books, movies and other works of fiction as a means to understand my own life, I readily relate to her methodology. She is eloquent and insightful about Muslim culture and the revolution in Iran that she lived through and other things in a way I appreciate.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
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1,028
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22
Michele Zone said:
I don't think it is absolutely necessary but I am considering reading those books and then going back to re-read it some day. The author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" is a professor of English Literature. Each section of the book is named for a book or an author and refers often to whichever book or author it is named for. It uses the plots of those books as a kind of metaphor for what was going on in her life during various stages (the book itself is a kind of memoir).

The first section is called "Lolita" and refers over and over to the themes in that book. As someone who has studied women's issues and other things she touches on a quite a bit, I had no trouble following her points, even without ever having read "Lolita". But if you have difficulty following her points, you might find it enriching to read "Lolita".

The second section is called "Gatsby". Again, I have not read "The Great Gatsby". I don't think I 'missed' anything in this book by not having that background but I suspect I would find it enriching to be more familiar with the story she refers to.

The third section is called "James" -- the last name of an author. The book most often referred to so far is called "Daisy Miller". I am in the midst of this section.

You could flip through the rest of the book and figure out the main theme of each of the sections and decide if you want to read some of these classics of English Literature as "background". Having used books, movies and other works of fiction as a means to understand my own life, I readily relate to her methodology. She is eloquent and insightful about Muslim culture and the revolution in Iran that she lived through and other things in a way I appreciate.

MZ, thanks for your detailed response. Wow, I didn't expect that reading this book would involve becoming educated or familiar with the English literature. It's just something that I never really got to do - reading classics that is.

By the way, I have read the Great Gasby. I didn't enjoy it. But, don't let me keep you from reading it.
 
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Hceux said:
MZ, thanks for your detailed response. Wow, I didn't expect that reading this book would involve becoming educated or familiar with the English literature. It's just something that I never really got to do - reading classics that is.

By the way, I have read the Great Gasby. I didn't enjoy it. But, don't let me keep you from reading it.
I don't have any specific plans about whether or not to read those books. I just find HER comments so intriguing, it makes me wonder about those books -- which doesn't necessarily mean those books will be wonderful books. Her insights are valuable and meaningful. Reading the books she references might add something to that but I fully realize the books themselve could be a disappointment. For example, I have read "Death of a Salesman" and other "classics" because they were assigned reading in High School. First of all, I think such assignments in high school tend to miss the mark -- they are often assigned because some adults find them deeply meaningful but that doesn't mean the teens will find it deeply meaningful. Second, it can be hard to convey the context in which the work originally appeared which made it an important work and I think classes often make no effort to convey the context. The changes which occurred after some important work appeared can make the important work seem "ordinary" in the eyes of later generations -- the way the special effects from "The Matrix" has infiltrated so much and is now ordinary and even redudant and not original but was very original and groundbreaking at the time.

Does that make any sense?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Just finished reading "The Big U" by Neal Stephenson, like the other books of his I have read, it started off good and interesting, then about 2/3 of the way in imploded on itself and the story went all to crap.

Maybe I do need to read some of the classics.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
I'm reading NEW YORK BURNING by the historian Jill LePore. It's about the prosecution of a slew of slaves in colonial New York City for allegedly plotting to burn the place to the ground. Pretty interesting material. Slavery in New York City. Some parellels with Salem, i.e. hysteria on the part of the establishment over supposed goings-on amongst the downtrodden/marginalized. The author can tend to be a little repetitive and too in love with her source material, but I'm enjoying the read and disgusted by what I'm reading about, at the same time, if that's possible.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,304
Points
53
i just finished Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver. if you enjoy fiction and nature then you'll enjoy this easy read. it is a nice way to reacquaint yourself with some of the principles of nature.

two thumbs up!
 

MM1648

Cyburbian
Messages
54
Points
4
Planning related

I am reading two books: The Creative City by Charles Landry...and Urban and Regional Planning 4th ed.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,900
Points
23
I just finished reading "Devil in the White City" loved the book.
I also read "Marley and Me" .. my mother told me to read it. Yes,,the dog was more destructive than mine...but I couldn't understand how they could put a very very old dog in a kennel for a week. He lost me there. I thought the book was a little self-serving. It did make he hug my old dog a little bit harder.
 

chukky

Cyburbian
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363
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12
tsc said:
I just finished reading "Devil in the White City" loved the book.
I also read "Marley and Me" .. my mother told me to read it. Yes,,the dog was more destructive than mine...but I couldn't understand how they could put a very very old dog in a kennel for a week. He lost me there. I thought the book was a little self-serving. It did make he hug my old dog a little bit harder.

Marley And Me was the perfect book when I read it, late on a sunday afternoon in the middle of winter.

Not sure I'd like to try it with more then half a brain on the job.
 

cch

Cyburbian
Messages
1,436
Points
20
For the first time in a long time, I am reading a book for pleasure. Lately, all I've been paging through have been parenting books, or home improvement manuals. But a few days ago I began reading

"Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World" by Greg Critser

I'm only about a quarter way through it, but I am already detesting fast food giants and most food companies for putting everyone's health in jeopardy just to save a few bucks. High Fructose Corn Syrup should never have been approved by the FDA.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
Points
40
Picked up "Weird Florida" by Charlie Carlson at the library today. It's fun. Quirky roadside attractions, haunted houses, weird mausoleums, etc. Hey RJ, they even have the possum monument near you in this book!

Next up, Fannie Flagg's new book, "Can't Wait to Get to Heaven".
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
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1,028
Points
22
Just finished looking at Architecture Now! 3 and also completed reading Signs of Our Time by John Margolies and Emily Gwathmey.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
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2
Now I'm reading WEDDING OF THE WATERS, which is a history of the Erie Canal. It's written by Peter Bernstein, who's an economist by trade, and so it's pretty lucid about the economic benefits that flowed (ha!) from the canal - and which, by extension, flow from other transportation infrastructure. Well-written and clear. Occasionally goofy.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
Messages
335
Points
11
Just finished "Cloud Atlas", by David Mitchell. Complex and smart book. Here's the chapter layout:

1) journal entry from 1850's from pacific islands
2) guy in 1920's belgium
3) woman in 1970's california
4) guy in modern day london
5) weird clone somewhere in the future
6) funny guy many centuries beyond that
7) weird clone somewherein the future
8) guy in modern day london
9) woman in 1970's california
10) guy in 1920's belgium
11)journal entry from 1850's pacific islands
 
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7,628
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29
MZ, oh, does that mean I should read the other books before I read "Reading Lolita in Tehran"? If so, could you share the names of these books?

UPDATE: The back of the book happens to have a "suggested reading" list which apparently names every book she references. It is a MUCH longer list than the one I gave you. There are also questions in the back of the book as well as a url for where you can conveniently print off the same questions from the publisher's website.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
working on "zodiac" by neal stephenson.

This is his last chance to convince me he is worth reading. Going OK so far, not very well written, but an Ok story so far (1/2 through it). waiting for it to turn to crap.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,905
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60
Started The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick

Next will be Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
funny novels

THANK YOU FOR SMOKING by Christopher Buckley was funny. I'd like to read more of his books. CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES by John Kennedy O'Toole is hilarious.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,300
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45
I bought Lost City by Clive Cussler today at Sam's Club for $5.24. Should be a good read at the beach this weekend.
 

zman

Cyburbian
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9,267
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34
Gearing up for my roadtrip, I am read Blue Highways by William Least Heat-Moon.
This is filler for the time until Neil Peart releases his new book Roadshow: A Concert Tour by Motorcycle about his travels on the road for Rush's 30th Anniversary tour.
 

otterpop

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28
I just started "Ripley Under Ground, " by Patricia Highsmith. One of her series of Ripley books. I recently saw a "Ripley' movie starring John Malcovich as the amoral Tom Ripley and was interested in the character. So far a good read.
 

geobandito

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509
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16
Re: Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake:
I still have about an eighth of the book to go, but I can tell you that my review is not mixed. This book is an excellent read. Some wonderfully thought-provoking story elements woven together. I'm looking forward to the ending as I feel it might be building to something quite unexpected.

I just finished this. A tad heavy-handed, but I agree that it's a great read. abrowne, I'm curious what you thought about the final eighth of the book. I thought it was a tad disappointing - too much to wrap up in too few pages.
 
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