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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,531
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60
Trying to get into American Pharaoh - about Richard J. Daley
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,895
Points
27
I just started the second-to-latest mystery in the Kinsey Millhone series by Sue Grafton, R is for Richochet. I read Q is for Quarry on audiotape when I had to make a five-hour drive somewhere, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I can't help but hear the voice of the audiotape narrator in my head while reading the new book in hard copy!
 

Tresmo

Cyburbian
Messages
873
Points
20
I just finished The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and I think I'm going to read a dumb little book about knitting next. I'll probably give up on it after a few pages, but it looked interesting at the library.:-D
 

luckless pedestrian

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I just finished The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and I think I'm going to read a dumb little book about knitting next. I'll probably give up on it after a few pages, but it looked interesting at the library.:-D

I read this with my book club, amazing book, no?
 

Tresmo

Cyburbian
Messages
873
Points
20
I read this with my book club, amazing book, no?

Definitely. I loved and read it in a day or two. The mood, style, or something about it reminded me of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. Similar themes, I think, and both are excellent books.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
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30
I'll probably give up on it after a few pages, but it looked interesting at the library.:-D

I tend to do the same thing. Read a really heavy book (usually on social movements, existentialism and/or metaphysics) followed by a brief happy go lucky - no words with more than 3 silly bulls - novellette such as "Shop Girl" or one of those Steinbeck mint green cover deals.
 

luckless pedestrian

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13,317
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55
My book club picked "Acts of Faith" for next month's book - it's about Sudan, I believe - can't remember the author
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
Just read (some of) FIASCO, about, naturally, our recent invasion and occupation of a certain middle eastern country. I say some because I got tired of it after a while and skipped to the end. Its focus is the military and I got bored by the details of military organization, protocol, history etc. That said, the author has a lot to say about the incompetence and ignorance with which the whole thing was conceived and launched. He's especially hard on Rumsfeld (duh), Wolfowitz, and Gen. Tommy Franks, who apparently planned an invasion and then not much else. One wonders what our options are there. Unfathomable horror.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
Messages
335
Points
11
Just plowed through everything written by RIchard Ford- the sportswriter, independence day, lay of the land, rock springs, the ultimate good luck, a piece of my heart, wildlife, women with men... a binge, and i loved it!
 

Tresmo

Cyburbian
Messages
873
Points
20
I tend to do the same thing. Read a really heavy book (usually on social movements, existentialism and/or metaphysics) followed by a brief happy go lucky - no words with more than 3 silly bulls - novellette such as "Shop Girl" or one of those Steinbeck mint green cover deals.

And I did that again with this book. I read a few sections of it and then put it down. Time for something more serious, I suppose. :)
 

Wildono

Cyburbian
Messages
92
Points
4
Travel always inspires me to read history/historiography...

A Concise History of Germany by Mary Fulbrook

Modern Germany by Volker Berghahn

Dry, but my interest is piqued in re-reading those undergrad history books.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
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31
Recently - Terry Pratchett's Nome trilogy.

Just finished reading cosmic cocktails. It is an antholgy of short sci fi stories that take place in bars.

onto

History of teh Jews by Stan Mack. it is a cartoonists interpretation of jewish hstory. pretty good so far.

Next in line is text books and class notes for an exam.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,702
Points
26
The illustrated collected stories of Sherlock Holmes (!!).

oooh, who is the publisher?

Doyle and O'Brian, two authors I can read in perpetuity!

I have three O'Brian's of the Aubrey /Maturin series, rereading Treasons Hharbour and current up to The Yellow Admiral. Also have a gut wrenching novel on the experiences of a South African Jewish surgeon who saw action in Angola and in Iraq tending the victims of these dreadful conflicts. Contact Wounds; A war surgeons education. Jonathan Kaplan
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
Messages
431
Points
13
I'm just finishing "Under the Banner of Heaven" by Jon Krakauer. It took me a while to get into this book. It starts more as a crime story, gets into the history of the LDS church and then links funamental mormonism with violence and rape (plural under-age wives). It helped explain some stuff I knew only a little about and helped me understand the recent arrest of Warren Jeffs.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Southern Living X-mas books; trying to find some new recipes for the holidays!

Next up: Nora Ephron's "I Feel Bad About My Neck and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman".
 

Tresmo

Cyburbian
Messages
873
Points
20
The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses are Beating the Global Competition by Michael Shuman

Very good.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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15,531
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60
A History of Housing in New York City - Richard Plunz
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,895
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27
The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses are Beating the Global Competition by Michael Shuman

Very good.

I enjoyed that book too.

Next up: Marketing in the Public Sector: A Roadmap for Improved Performance by Philip Kotler and Nancy Lee. Not exactly "light reading," but it looks like it has a lot of good ideas on how to build support for various government initiatives... such as community plans.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
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1,900
Points
23
I am reading the Pilot's Wife....and not really enjoying it at all....:-|
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
Points
40
Two X-mas gifts from that other Cyburbian: The Bon Appetit cookbook, and Clive Cussler's "Treasure of Khan". The cookbook came with a 12-month subscription to the magazine, yay!
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
More of a re-read. I gave my son "Kidnapped" for Christmas. One of my favorite stories from childhood. Exciting and scary.
 

MountainTOD

Cyburbian
Messages
43
Points
2
The Uplift War - by David Brin (upteenth time)
Humans, modified Chimps and Dolphins vs everybody else in universe - Great SciFi

World War Z - (by son of) Mel Brooks
personal accounts of survivors of a world wide zombie infestation.
Do not read before bed time.
?sequal? to Worst case survival guide: zombie attack

All the President's Men - Woodward and Bernstien (audiobook)
reads like a crime story. Reporter/detectives solve a crime.
It seems so familiar, almost a cliched plot. Reality mirroring fiction?

Code of the Woosters - PJ Woodhouse? (audiobook)
1920s Comic Farce.

oddly I read only fantasy and Sci-Fi - but will listen to anything, the more classic the better.
 

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
Messages
8,278
Points
28
Just finished re-reading Hawaii by Michener. Lots of good insights into the whys and wherefores of the world in all his novels but more readable than those high school textbooks that nearly soured me on history for life many years ago. Still, it bothers me that Michener never seemed to be able end a novel cleanly. They just kind of die from exhaustion at the end. Maybe it's time to pick up the Lord of the Rings trilogy again or maybe Clavell. Just can't stay away from those really long novels.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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30,148
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74
Maybe it's time to pick up the Lord of the Rings trilogy again or maybe Clavell. Just can't stay away from those really long novels.
Speaking of Clavell, I reread Shogun not too long ago. It's every bit the page turner now that it was 20 years ago. Picked up Noble House immediately afterwards and after only a few pages found myself somehow unable to 'get into' the story and abandoned the effort. Maybe I was too attached to the Anjin-san character at that moment and was secretly hoping to read more Shogun where they left off.:( Maybe I'll try again sometime in the not too distant future.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
Just finished reading THE LOOMING TOWER, about al Queda and how 9/11 happened, and, partially, why our intelligence agencies couldn't stop it from happening. It's a very well-written book; I have to hand it to the author. There's a whole world out there we Americans are but dimly aware of, and we are imperiled by our ignorance.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
Points
30
Finished - The Union Club Mysteries - Isaac Asimov
Started - Love in the Time of Cholrea - Gabriel Marquez
On the Shelf - Resurrection - Leo Tolstoy
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Jennifer Government, I think someone else here read it. Pretty good crime novel so far.

Recent Reads

Our Cancer Year - Pekar
End of War - Sacco
Big Book of Martyrs - various
Escape from Loki - Phillip Jose Farmer writes a Doc Savage Adventure
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
Son of a Witch by Gregory Maguire. It is the follow-up to Wicked. interesting read. would be a good book to just dive into and devour in one sitting. however, because of my bustling social life :p i haven't had the opportunity.

next on the list:

What is the What by Dave Eggers. A fictionalized memoir of a Lost Boy.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
Now I'm reading THE AFFLUENT SOCIETY by John Kenneth Galbraith. Why? I don't know. Dude can turn a phrase, though.
 

Mark

Cyburbian
Messages
151
Points
7
Trout Madness

Trout Bum, John Gierach.

A River Runs Through It and other stories, Norman Maclean.

TROUT MADNESS- BEING A DISSERTATION ON THE SYMPTOMS AND PATHOLOGY OF THIS INCURABLE DISEASE BY ONE OF ITS VICTIMS, Robert Traver (John Voleker). He also wrote Anatomy of a Murder and was an attorney from Ishpeming MI.

Well Tempered Angler, Arnold Gingrich. Founder and editor of Esquire.

A Place on the Water, an angler's reflections of home, Jerry Dennis. A Michigan author.



Every winter I read these books.
 

luckless pedestrian

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55
last month's book that I did not read but I will was: Acts of Faith by Caputo

Next month is Frankie's Place, can't remember the author but it takes place right here in the island, so every bookstore on the island likely has dozens of copies of it...
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Currently reading Mitch Albom's One More Day. I'm half way through the book and it's going alright.

I've temporary put a hold on Frank McCourt's Teacher Man .
 

Tide

Cyburbian
Messages
2,719
Points
24
About to finish "The Wal-Mart Effect"; interesting book. The author doesn't really take sides but lays out many facts that you can then make your own judgements about Wal-Mart. If anyone is interested in having it after I'm done just PM me and I'll mail it out to you.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,837
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26
Hmmm I swore I had posted I was reading The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins... Now if someone believes I'm starting a flame war with that, they're wrong. I recomend it for everyone anyways, although I doubt many will read it.

EDIT:
Well then i suppose it wasn't censorship... my bad.
http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=28097

Anyways, the invitation is standing. Anyone can read it, it's not that tough.
Also, please don't flame me for it... I'm only expecting decent discussion of the book, no flamewars.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
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30
I'd say let's start a book club and discuss.... but I finished reading Asimov when I was 12. No, I'm not kidding.

To be honest the last time I read Asimov was about 21 years ago, but I found The Union Club Mysteries in the public library give away pile, so I had to take it home and read it. There was also an Arthur C. Clarke book in there that I rescued.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
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15,531
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60
At Home In The Loop - How Clout and Community Built Chicago's Dearborn Park
By Lois Wille

It's a history about the planing and development of the Dearborn Park neighborhood which is just south of the Loop and was built on derelict railyards from the late 70s through the 90s.

It's a cool thing for a Chicago real estate development history buff like me. :)
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
Messages
431
Points
13
I'm trying to finish up John Keegan's "The First World War". At about 425 pages he has to leave out a bunch of details. The book is a description of a Generals' war with some battles with 10,000 + killed only getting a sentence or two of discussion. Not much on the conditions of living in a trench or facing almost certain death while going over the top. This book was a best seller but the author's sentence structure can be difficult to get through. Its good as an overview of a long and deadly war but if you know the general scope of WWI then you should look for a book that focuses on a single battle, front or specific branch of the armed forces in this conflict.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
In the last 2 days, I've started two books (mystery and a thriller) that I just couldn't get into. That doesn't happen too often. So I'm going with a tried and true author tonite and starting Tim Dorsey's Hurricane Punch. I know I'll be laughing. And back to the library for another batch tomorrow!
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,295
Points
24
At lunchtime and in spare moments in the office, I'm reading "Why People Believe Wierd Things" by Shermer. At home, I'm reading one of the quintet of Dark Elf books by Salvatore. D'rizzt Du'Urden is one of my favorite fictional characters ever.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
Supply and Demand and Narcolepsy

Couldn't finish THE AFFLUENT SOCIETY. I will never again attempt to read a book about economics. Life's too short. I've moved on to MASTER OF THE SENATE, about Lyndon Johnson's years as Senate Majority Leader. 3rd in multi-volume life of LBJ by Robert Caro. Caro is a great writer; LBJ is a fascinating character = damned good read. Long, though.
 

Tresmo

Cyburbian
Messages
873
Points
20
I'm being a HUGE nerd and rereading the Harry Potter books to prepare for the July publication of the last one. I used to look down on the Harry Potter readers, until I read one and got hooked. :-$
 
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