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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Trout Bum, John Gierach.

A River Runs Through It and other stories, Norman Maclean.

TROUT MADNESS- BEING A DISSERTATION ON THE SYMPTOMS AND PATHOLOGY OF THIS INCURABLE DISEASE BY ONE OF ITS VICTIMS, Robert Traver (John Voleker). He also wrote Anatomy of a Murder and was an attorney from Ishpeming MI.

Well Tempered Angler, Arnold Gingrich. Founder and editor of Esquire.

A Place on the Water, an angler's reflections of home, Jerry Dennis. A Michigan author.

Every winter I read these books.

Ever read The River Why? I am not a fisherman, but I really liked that one.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,837
Points
26
Well I finished The God Delusion last week... pretty good if you think you can discuss religion, if not then it's just empty words.

Now after reading a detectivesque/historical fiction novel about Columbus (In spanish though), I'm currently hooked with Mark Danielewski's House Of Leaves. It's not a new novel, and it's not an easy read, since it's basically a story within a story, and you can say it's pretty experimental. It's about a house that is bigger on the inside than the outside, I won't say more than that.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,943
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39
Finally reading some books not WWII-related:

The Bus We Loved - Travis Elborough. A Memoir of London's Routemaster Buses.

Palin Diaries - "The Python Years - 1969-1979" - Michael Palin.
 
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donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
I am reading The Jokes Over by Ralph Steadman. It is his account of events depicted by Hunter S Thompson. So far very good, I am going to have to reead the HST articles though.
 

DrumLineKid

Cyburbian
Messages
149
Points
6
I've only finished one.........

Since coming home in June, I have started so many:

Cracking Da Vinci's Code by Garlow and Jones; two men that are afraid that a piece of fiction will ruin everyone's mind
A Team of Rivals by Goodwin; a great sample of men who used the language to it's best, but supper long. I have to go back
The Death and Life of the ...by Jacobs; I know its a Planning classic (gospel according to Jane?) but I made it through the Street & couldn't continue, It was all opinions based on a limited sample/experience
and a few that made no influence.
I did finish the DUNE Prequel The Battle for Corrin.
Maybe I am too critical or just bore easily....
(I am a little older so college habits have waivered......) DLK
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
Points
30
Finished - Love in the Time of Cholera - Marquez, The Age of Innocence - Wharton and The Torrents of Spring - Turgenev.
Started - Resurrection - Tolstoy
On Deck - I don't know (perhaps McKibben or Obama)

******

JNA gave me a lead on a 1978 book that's recently gained some popular regarding one of my favorite subjects... Russian Thinkers. There is a back order that is almost equal to the original run in 1978. It's interesting how these things work and the power of a little publicity thanks to the New York Times can give.
 
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Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
12,172
Points
48
I've been reading C.J. Box's Joe Pickett series. The protagonist is a game warden in fictional Saddlestring, Wyoming in the Big Horn Mountains. Decent pieces of mind candy. Shows both the West and the environmental movement is a different light.
 

Gedunker

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Just finished 1776 by David McCullough. I swear, when I read that man's writing, I hear his voice. It's a fascinating read without getting bogged down in military details.

I have no idea what I'll read next and with spring coming, I may take a little hiatus to get some work done on the house.
 

ecodharmamark

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
Goldie, Douglas & Furnass (eds) (2005) In Search of Sustainability. CSIRO Publishing, Australia

A great read! Each chapter is written by a different author, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Hamnett and Freestone (eds) (2000) The Australian Metropolis: A Planning History. Allen & Unwin, Australia

Just starting this one today. Looks like it could be a good one. Get back to you when the job is done.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
The Alexandria Link by Steve Berry. He also wrote The Templar Legacy. Cotton Malone is back!

Next up: Lincoln Child's Deep Storm.

Last read: The Sweet Potato Queens' 1st Big-Ass Novel.
 

luckless pedestrian

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56
I'm at lunch, really I am

My book club meeting this week is on "The Winter of my Discontent" by John Steinbeck - I am really enjoying it, it's nice to dust off a classic writer - :)

Next month, I guess we are reading one from the guy who wrote Angela's Ashes, something about teachers, I think? :r:
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
Onto Neal Stephenson's Cob Web pretty good spy novel

The I'll be onto an Orson Scott Caird book.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
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25
Onto Neal Stephenson's Cob Web pretty good spy novel

The I'll be onto an Orson Scott Caird book.
Is Cob Web a new one?
I'm reading Xenocide at the moment after enjoying Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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31
Is Cob Web a new one?
I'm reading Xenocide at the moment after enjoying Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead.

cobweb is by neal stephenson. he also wrote snow crash (really good) and diamond crash (ok) it is older and was originally published under a pseudo name

from the enders game series you still have

children of the mind
enders shadow
shadow of the hegemon
shadow puppets
first meetings(have not read this one, yet)

the second half of the series switches to different characters and is more like enders game then xenocide and speaker for the dead. They are more adventure oriented.

If you want some of OSC's crazy works check out Treasure Box (creepy ghost / love story that really hit home with me) and treason (a sci fi world story - don't remember it too well). I would stay away from the worthing saga and the 7 sons series. I'll let you know how "magic street" is.
 

Meyre

Member
Messages
8
Points
0
Books....yum. :)

I'm waiting for the last Harry Potter, as well.....but in the meantime, I've polished off Barbara Hambly's first New Orleans book - A Free Man of Color, which was excellent, I have the rest of that series to finish and two Mercedes Lackey books on deck.....finished Pat McManus - They Shoot Canoes, Don't They. I think Elizabeth Peters is due out with a new Peabody novel soon, and I can't wait for that one.

M

"Too many books, too little time...."
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,448
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25
cobweb is by neal stephenson. he also wrote snow crash (really good) and diamond crash (ok) .
I know that, snow crash is one of my faourites! I think you mean 'the diamond age' :p

Did you hear there might be a movie made of the diamond age?

Treasure Box sounds interesting!
 

donk

Cyburbian
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31
I know that, snow crash is one of my faourites! I think you mean 'the diamond age' :p

Did you hear there might be a movie made of the diamond age?

Treasure Box sounds interesting!

oops:-$

guess you've probably read "zodiac" and "the big u"? cob web has more in common with them then those other books
 

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
Messages
8,278
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28
The Mind Map Book, How to Use Radiant Thinking to Maximize Your Brain's Untapped Potential by Tony Buzan.

There's got to be some creativity left in the old brain. I know all that alcohol must have preserved something. Pickled, preserved, it's all the same isn't it?+o(
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
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30
Finished - Resurrection by Leo Tolstoy. I've read most of his fiction and some of his non-fiction and Resurrection is my favorite. If you have any social justice, simple living and spirituality in you at all, you need to read this book. It capsulates many of tenets to Tolstoyian Christian thought, but it's not overly wrapped up in psychobabble. The story line is excellent, the philosophy is sprinkled throughout and his writting is fabulous.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
THE ERA OF RECONSTRUCTION by Kenneth Stampp, from 1965. Easy to read, very cogent and convincing. A short introduction to the revisionist view of reconstruction, which I believe is now pretty much the dominant interpretation. A refutation of the pernicious GONE WITH THE WIND view of Southern history. (Isn't it maddening that a movie can be so beautiful, so moving, so damned entertaining - and so dangerous and full of it at the same time?)
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,895
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27
I just finished Darker Than the Deepest Sea, a biography of musician Nick Drake. It was a fascinating read - like most good biographies are - though I don't necessarily agree with author Trevor Dann's speculations about the factors contributing to Drake's untimely death in 1974.

For those of you who are not familiar with Nick Drake, his song "Pink Moon" was used as part of a VW commercial not long ago. According to the biography, that advertising campaign revived interest in Drake's music to the point that more of his albums have been sold since then than while he was alive (did I word that right??).
 

Denman

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Messages
5
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0
To switch things up from my default sf bent (yay card and stephenson ^^), I'm switching back and forth between Lisa Jones' Bulletproof Diva (short essays on femininity and race - well done, thought provoking, punchy writing) and Jose Donoso's The Obscene Bird of Night (dark book of a surrealist bent out of 70's Chile).

I highly recommend both.
 

jaws

BANNED
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1,504
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21
I know that, snow crash is one of my faourites! I think you mean 'the diamond age' :p

Did you hear there might be a movie made of the diamond age?

Treasure Box sounds interesting!
George Clooney is making it.

****ing awesome news. The Diamond Age is the greatest sci-fi story of all time.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
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George Clooney is making it.

****ing awesome news. The Diamond Age is the greatest sci-fi story of all time.

wow... The Diamond Age... a movie? Sounds interesting, and complicated. I hope it turns out well. :) I really enjoyed that book.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
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335
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11
About a third of the way through "9-headed dragon river" by Peter Matthiessen. For Matthiessen fans, its a pretty incredible look at Zen Buddhism by one of the greatest naturalists of our time.

Just finished a couple of Margaret Atwood books- "the Blind Assassin" and "Oryx and Crake". Both pretty darn cool books, mixing sci-fi up with the here and now.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
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Waiting at the library and next up to read: Blue Christmas by Mary Kay Andrews. Any of you southern women want some hilarious chick books, hers qualify.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,943
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39
Picked up and started reading a copy of Orwell's 1984 at a friends place on the weekend. Always worth a read - definitely makes more sense to me now than the last time I read it (back in 1984, when I was 12).
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
Messages
431
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13
I just finished reading Misquoting Jesus by Bart Ehrman, 2006. I found it very enlightening. Ehrman reviews some of the changes made to the New Testament over the centuries by scribes and others. It helped me understand the context under which the texts were written and then changed to suite a social or individual's view of the world or an interpretaton of the teaching of Jesus. If you don't know much about the early Christian world but would like to, you might look at this book.
 

Gedunker

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Am reading about revolutionary-turned-democratic-subversive John Adams by David McCollough. To defeat one's enemy, one must know one's enemy. (Plus, is good way to learn about Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Abigail Adams, and John Quincy Adams all in one book, da?)
 

Zoning Goddess

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Another in a southern chick-lit series, "I Gave You My Heart, But You Sold It Online" by Dixie Cash. Author of "My Heart May Be Broken, But My Hair Still Looks Great"....:) Light reading, but lots of fun. :-D

(Some of you people are sooooooooooooo serious.....)
 

Journeymouse

Cyburbian
Messages
440
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13
The last book I read was Terry Pratchett's Wintersmith. I bought it for my sister last Christmas and just got round to borrowing it, only for my new (to you guys, anyway) dog to eat it. Thankfully, there was enough left to be able to read the book, but I will be buying my sister another copy.

In my 'to read' pile:
Soul Purpose by Nick Marsh
Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee
Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson
Jane Austen's six novels - time for a re-read as British TV just did some adaptions I found dire and I want to know why I think they were way off.

And finally, I don't seem to have much time for reading at the moment as I'm too busy writing. I'm about 7/8ths through my first draft and trying to control my excitement. I'm a muppet.
 

Flying Monkeys

Cyburbian
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607
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18
I just found this cool thread....

I had read Hampton Sides 'Blood and Thunder' - a history of Kit Carson’s explorer days and generally about the times.

So then... I read Hampton Sides 'Americana: Dispatches from the New Frontier' - This book is borderline planning literature. It is some of the magazine pieces he has written over the years. The book is basically about how anything in America has its own subculture. (kinda like 'planners who post on Cyburbia' would be a subculture) and how all these subcultures self-support. Example: Harley Riders and Airstreams trailer owners. I recommend this for an insightful read.

Now...I am reading 'Running with Scissors' by Augustan Burroughs - slow so far, but to feels like it will get better.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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I'm on a Philip K. Dick kick:

currently reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
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2
THE HAUNTED LANDS by Tina Rosenberg. It's about former Soviet bloc countries dealing with the transition away from Communism. Re-reading it, actually, after just having seen THE LIVES OF OTHERS, great movie about East Germans and their secret police, the Stasi. Makes me wonder what's in store for Cuba (and of course the US), post-Fidel. Communists deserve pensions, too, don't they? Would a new Cuban regime honor those kinds of committments by the previous? Maybe the Communists will prevail even after Castro. Wouldn't that be a kick in the head to the right-wingers? i'm rambling...
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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"The Whole World Over" by Julia Glass. An excellent novel. Her first book won the National Book Award so I've just put that on hold at the library. This one is about several people in NYC in the year leading up to 9/11.
 

donk

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I'm on a Philip K. Dick kick:

currently reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

I'd also suggest "we can build you" and "the game players of titan"

I am planning on rereading all of my vonnegut books over the next few weeks. Started with cats cradle as I don't remember it too well, plus the idea of reading about bokon and the afterlife right now intrigues me considering his passing.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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I just finished another book I got for x-mas Michael Crichton "Next". It's his lastest stab into sci-fi and deals with genetic engineering. It brings up some interesting points but it's too pop lit to be good sci-fi. It's you typical Crichton book and similar to all the others he has written the past 30+ years. I imagine it also will be made into a movie.
 

mendelman

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Onto the last Philip K. Dick book in the pile: The Cosmic Puppets

So far, it reads like an extended episode of the Twilight Zone.
 

cch

Cyburbian
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1,436
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20
Has nothing to do with planning, but last night I was indulging in Quilted Bags in a Weekend:-D . I made my daughter a little patchwork purse with fabrics she picked out, before I even found this book with helpful instructions.
 

Flying Monkeys

Cyburbian
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607
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18
'Running with Scissors' is a no recommend. Really sad look at a kid growing up gay twenty years ago masquerading as comedy literature. Not worth the time I spent to read it.

Started reading 'Guns, Germs, and Steel' by Jared Diamond. Cover states that the book won the Pulitzer Prize. The subtitle promises a lot..."The Fates of Human Societies".
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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I am reading "The American West as Living Space," by Wallace Stegner. He is one of my favorite fiction and non-fiction writers. "Angle of Repose" is a great novel of his.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
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335
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11
This is a little embarassing, but I'm going to expose myself. I just finished "Eat, Pray, Love" by Elizabeth Gilbert and, even though I'm a guy, I completely enjoyed it. I'm such a sucker for those sappy spiritual pilgramage books.
 

kjel

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I am reading Persian Mirrors by Elaine Sciolino.....veteran reporter of the NY Times installed in the Paris office but covers middle eastern news often. The book is about the social and cultural facets of Iran beyond the outward facing politics. It's quite interesting to read her recounting of many events over the last 3 decades.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
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1,900
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23
I just read "Little Chapel By the River" book about a local irish pub stuck in the 1950s... located about 40 miles north of NYC on the Hudson Line. Was very good. Last year I went and watched 5th of July Fireworks here...and wondered about the place (West Point Military Academy across the Hudson River)

gbounds-340-Littlechapel_hc.jpg
 

Zoning Goddess

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One of my rare non-fiction excursions, from the NYT bestsellers list, Amy Sedaris' "I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence". A hilarious look at entertaining, actually with some really good suggestions. Even my Mom, who was flipping thru it the other day, thought it was funny. Hmmm.... wait, that should give me pause....;)
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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Reading right now?

The back label of a bottle of Kenwood, 2003, Sonoma County, cabernet sauvignon (13.5% Alc. by Vol.). A good read and "...a testament to a fine vintage in Sonoma County." :r:
 

luckless pedestrian

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I just picked up my book club book that I have to be done with by May 10th

The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan -

the untold story of the those that survived the Great American Dustbowl

 

tsc

Cyburbian
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The back label of a bottle of Kenwood, 2003, Sonoma County, cabernet sauvignon (13.5% Alc. by Vol.). A good read and "...a testament to a fine vintage in Sonoma County." :r:

I finished one and started another just like that tonignt...;)
Must be in the same club..
 
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