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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

Budgie

Cyburbian
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30
Finished - The Hedonist Handbook;
Started - Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
On the Shelf - Various... but I might buy more Orwell.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
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I was in B&N looking at "The Dangerous Book for Boys" by Iggulden.
Pretty interesting collection of stuff you should either know or be aware of.

Has anybody else looked at it or own it ?

I picked this up for my 14 y.o. but he hasn't shown any interest so RJ is reading it. Today I started "Lean Mean Thirteen" by Janet Evanovich.
 

luckless pedestrian

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I have not got it yet, but the next book club book is: “A thousand splendid suns” by Khaled Hosseini (“Kite Runner” author).

I loved "the Kite Runner" so I am looking forward to this one.
 

kjel

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I picked this up for my 14 y.o. but he hasn't shown any interest so RJ is reading it. Today I started "Lean Mean Thirteen" by Janet Evanovich.

I just finished "Inheritance of Loss" by Kiran Desai, a pretty decent book but I didn't like the ending. Harry Potter VII is up next!
 
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357
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12
I was in B&N looking at "The Dangerous Book for Boys" by Iggulden.
Pretty interesting collection of stuff you should either know or be aware of.

Has anybody else looked at it or own it ?

I own it! Some great 'Boy's Own' tales in it, and a great 'bathroom book' to have lying around for those that find the bathroom as their last remaining point of refuge from everyday life ;-)

Currently reading 'A Tale Etched In Blood And Hard Black Pencil' by Christopher Brookmyre. He's probably my favourite author at the moment.
 

zman

Cyburbian
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9,267
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34
To continue my Edward Abbey fascination of late, I am plowing through The Fools Progress.

I am beginning to think that I like Abbey's writing style and tend to wonder if many of his characters are the embodiment of what many wish they could be/do.
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
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431
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13
To continue my Edward Abbey fascination of late, I am plowing through The Fools Progress.

I have only read Abbey's non-fiction works. I was thinking about re-reading Desert Solitaire after may lastest Utah desert trip this past May. Someday I plan on reading his classic fiction works.
 

Carl Kandy

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43
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2
BECAUSE IT IS BITTER AND BECAUSE IT IS MY HEART by Joyce Carole Oates. I'm not sure why I read this, but it's a good novel. Soem people are hopeless.
Now I just started the first of Robert Caro's three books about LBJ. I read the third one, MASTER OF THE SENATE, last year. Caro is one of our best writers.
 

Budgie

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30
Finished: Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
Reading: Keep the Aspidistra Flying by George Orwell
On the Shelf: Various stuff.... I like the Orwell though.
 

Daytonpix

Member
Messages
14
Points
1
I have sort of a personal interest in bohemia and bohemianism, so I just got out Garrets and Pretenders, a History of Bohemianism in America, by Albert Parry. Published in 1933! ,

..and, after that, Selling the Lower East Side, Culture Real Estate and Resistance in New York City, by Christopher Mele.

I probably won't read the entire books, just certain passages and chapters on eras or apsects that are of interest.
 

MM1648

Cyburbian
Messages
54
Points
4
Both Planning and non planning

Yes, Ive just finished reading the 7th potter book this past week. I grew up with this book when it first came out back when I was 11yrs old. :-D

Now I am reading a book called The Creative City by Charles L.

Also this months issue of the Planning magazine from the APA.

And I'm also browsing through a textbook really... Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering... just for fun.;-)
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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30
Finished: Keep the Aspidistra Flying (I've been Gordon Comstock for the past 5 years) by George Orwell
Reading: Burmese Nights by George Orwell
On the Shelf: Various stuff.... I like the Orwell though.
 

Planderella

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5,344
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31
Inspired by my love of the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movies and derision of that so-called reality show "Pirate Master," I decided to pick up a few books on pirate lore. I'm currently reading The Most Evil Pirates in History.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
Recent reads - have had lots of spare time for pleasure reading

Still working on Bedroom Secrets of Master Chefs - a bit of a tough read and not a page turner

Finished reading

The Ghost Brigades - John Scalzi - 2nd book in old man's war series, not as good as the first, but still enjoyable

Ring - Koji Suzuki - interesting psychological thriller/sci-fi horror, first in a series. Translation is a bit weak in spots, but a good story, easy to read.

The Gutbucket Quest - Piers Anthony/Ron Lemming - from teh bargain bin ($2) at the sci-fi book store - easy read, ok story

Macedonia - Harvey Pekar and Heather Roberson - the crusty guy shares his talent and contacts with someone else

In the queue

Bloodsucking Fiends - Christopher Moore - know it will be an easy read

Accelerando - Charles Stross - not too sure about this one, have tried to start it a few times with no success.

My first deep budget cut for school is going to be buying books.
 

wahday

Cyburbian
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23
I'm part way through Bill McKibben's Hope Human and Wild. I'm reading the section profiling Curitiba Brazil. The last section is on Kerala, India. Pretty interesting stuff and inspiring for sure.

With two kids, though, most reading is of short duration and centered on the bathroom. The New Yorker is my main companion there. Reading an article now about bonobos.
 

kjel

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50 or so pages left in Hampton Sides' Ghost Soldiers.

That's an excellent read. I read it shortly after The Greatest Generation books came out. It's a testament to sheer determination of survival.

Trail Nazi said:
The new Harry Potter! So far so good.

I'm about 400 pages into it. Do you find it is written in a more casual tone than the previous books? It's somehow disconcerting. Still humming along 'til it ends.
 

geobandito

Cyburbian
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509
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16
My first deep budget cut for school is going to be buying books.
So, will you be at the Toronto Public Library like me? :)

I tried reading The Black Book by Orhan Pamuk over vacation. It looked really promising, but after 100 pages I still couldn't get into it, so I gave up. But now I'm curious how it ends.
 

kjel

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Finished HP VII, many twists and turns but the expected triumph of good over evil happened. I wonder if Rowling will ever come back and write a prequel of something of the sort.

Next up is Maximum City: Bombay Lost & Found. Essentially it is an exploration of one of the world's most populous and complex cities.
 

Maister

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Finished HP VII, many twists and turns but the expected triumph of good over evil happened. I wonder if Rowling will ever come back and write a prequel of something of the sort.
I don't forsee a prequel happening but I wouldn't be surprised if we saw a sequel in about 10 years.

I generally enjoyed HP7. The ending was predictable but gratifying nonetheless.

Right now I'm reading a Star Trek novel "Spock's World"
 

Senior Jefe

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431
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Last week while on vacation I read Bill McKibben’s new book Deep Economy. This book tries to offer an alternative to constant economic growth, free trade and the personal acquisition of more and more stuff. He does a good job in explaining that the earth can not sustain the current growth seen in China and India and that the western style economic growth has not made Americans happier or healthier than other parts of the world. He touches on peak oil, global warming, plus the pollution, low wages and other problems of industrial agriculture to support a change in how the world looks at economic development. McKibben does offer alternatives that are appearing more and more reasonable given the direction human kind is heading. It’s a good read for those concerned about the future of the planet.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
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1,295
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24
I'm about 1/3 of the way through "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond. I bought it a couple years ago, and I promised myself that I'd slug through it.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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26,964
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71
Longest Voyage: Circumnavigators In Age Of Discovery by Robert Silverberg, 1972

in 1595 Spain's Philip II -
suggested to the Vicroy of Peru that a voyage of exploration might be
a useful way to rid that land of the idle, restless, overambitious gentry...

The ships were well equiped but had been stocked with every superfluous ruffian in Peru, and
to make things worse Mendana brought along his wife, an aggressive, ferociously ambitious women whose selfishness and arrogance greatly disrupted the entprise.

just loved that quote and had to share it. :-D
 

luckless pedestrian

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I have not got it yet, but the next book club book is: “A thousand splendid suns” by Khaled Hosseini (“Kite Runner” author).

Finished it last night at 2 AM for my book club meeting tonight - it was fantastic! wow, though, sad and hopeful all at once - a good read, however emotional
 

otterpop

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I know I am way behind most everyone else in this regard, but I finallly began reading The Da Vinci Code. I have found it to be a real page turner and the premise of the sacred feminine meshes with my other post about childhood epiphanies. ;)
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
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22
Now, it's summer time and I find I have more time to read.

I recently finished reading "Motel Americana: A State-by-State Tour Guide to Nostaglic Stopovers" by Andrew F. Wood and Jenny L. Wood.

I am now reading "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference" by Malcolm Gladwell.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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31
Just started The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs - Irvine Welsh

and of course books and articles for school.

This must be a record for me, I am still reading this book, and it has finally gotten to the page turning stage, nearly 250 pages in. I hope to have it done by the weekend. Typically if I am not into a story, I stop reading it.

Next in line is

Floyd Landis - How I won the Tour.
 

Senior Jefe

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I just read A Sense of the World, How A Blind Man Became History's Greatest Traveler by Jason Roberts. It was one of the best books I have read in a few years. It is a true story about British Naval Lt. James Holman, A.K.A. "The Blind Traveler". The author did some great research on a man few have heard of since the 19th Century. I never lost interest in the story and at 355 pages it only took me a week to finish it.
 

Mud Princess

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Next in line is

Floyd Landis - How I won the Tour.

I'm trying to come up with a snappy response to that one, but it is too late in the day. ;-)

I am now reading The River Where America Began: A Journey Along the James, by Bob Deans. It's a new book about the history of the James River in Virginia... very timely since the 400th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement was celebrated with a lot of fanfare (e.g., a visit from Queen Elizabeth) this year.
 

Budgie

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8-20-07

Finished - Bermese Days by George Orwell
Started - Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
On the Shelf - Bill McKibbens new book... the title escapes me.
 

mendelman

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Starship Troopers - Heinlein

Social/philosophical treatise disguised as sci-fi.
 

donk

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Starship Troopers - Heinlein

Social/philosophical treatise disguised as sci-fi.

This is one of my favourite Heinlein stories. Remember when it was written and Heinlein's expereinces during the war.

I would argue that the morals of this story of loyalty, hard work, thinking and acting in a responsible manner far outway the criticisms related to xenophobia (sp?) and jingoism that people now throw around. Also remember that this was originally to be part of his "juvenile" series for Boys Life.

To bad ZG has left the building, I bet she could add to this discussion.

If you like the concept of starship troopers and want to see how someone else interprets it check out the new "Old Mans War" series.
 

mendelman

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donk, I do have Stranger in a Strange Land next.

I don't necessarily see the xenophobia or jingoism stuff (that's people looking to find something that's not there).

But one certainly sees that Heinlein did not like communism and I agree with the "criticisms" that there is not much actual "story" in the book. Would I critize Heinlein for it? I don't think "no story" is that much of a problem.
 

otterpop

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donk, I do have Stranger in a Strange Land next.

Stranger in a Strange Land is one of my favorite books. One book I think about from time to time.

I am reading New Geographies of the American West, by William Travis. Good book about the myths and realities of development in the American West. Also What Are People For, by Wendell Berry.
 

Maister

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Reading that literary classic by Howard Pyle "Robin Hood"
 

donk

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donk, I do have Stranger in a Strange Land next.

Stranger in a Strange Land is one of my favorite books. One book I think about from time to time.

I must have missed that day at heinlein appreciation school, SIASL is one of my least favourite of his books, and of all time (Time Enough for Love and Beyond this horizon also fall into this category)

favourites include

The Door into Summer - a few odd things in that some may find offensive, but a great book and one that describes autocad and a few other things well before their time.
The Glory Road - good fantasy and story
Farham's Freehold - another book that is highly criticised (race relations)
The Puppet Masters
Job - a great love story with funny twists
Friday - what being human and humane is all about
Citizen of the Galaxy - good story, good morals

The rest of his books are memorable and enjoyable too, but are harder for me to remember and link together.

since nearly every book is still in print, it is interesting to read them in order to see the progression of his career, teh other interesting thing to do is to read them according to the "history of future past" timeline and see the continuity of many different stories over a 50 year writing career.
 

donk

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Last night I read

This will all end in tears by Joe Ollman

A collection of comics that have a slant that reflects the title. Drawing is pretty good, the writing is better.

http://www.wagpress.net/

This book won the wright award for best canadian comic of the year.

Also finished reading house of sugar by kraatz, some of her strips are really funny, others I wonder what she was smoking.
 

rcgplanner

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I have a habit of starting more than one book at a time. I am currently working on:

Anderson Cooper's Dispatches from The Edge
-and-
Barbara Ehrenreich's Bait and Switch

Both good books, but Bait and Switch might not be the best choice while I am job searching. :r:
 

TexanOkie

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2,902
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1. True Urbanism (Hinshaw)
2. The Federalist Papers (Jay, Hamilton, Madison)
3. An American Life: The Autobiography (Reagan)
4. Demystifying Grant Seeking (Brown and Brown)

Not much most people would find interesting, but I like them. Except the grant book. That one's just important, not fun.
 

Budgie

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Has anyone here read A Year in Provance? I friend loaned me a copy and said it's a very good read describing daily life in France.
 

Budgie

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5,262
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30
Just started The Robots of Dawn - Asimov

Read that many years ago. Exploration of the laws of robotics on a planet where the social lines between robots and the human world are blurred. A "gentically inferior" Earthling detective (ala Columbo) travels to one of the outlying colonized planets to investigate a mysterious death. The details escape me, but I believe there is a love triangle involved.....with a robot... EEEWWWWWW !!!!!
 

donk

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Reading

You Suck, sequel to Bloodsucking Fiends

then onto

Spirals, the sequel to The Ring
 

Mud Princess

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I'm reading a book produced by the New York Historical Society called Slavery in New York. Light reading, it's not... but it is really quite interesting, as it deals with a relatively little-known aspect of New York City's history.

Next up will be Bill McKibben's latest book, Deep Economy.
 

luckless pedestrian

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Has anyone here read A Year in Provance? I friend loaned me a copy and said it's a very good read describing daily life in France.

my book club read this last summer - I liked it but nobody else did in my group - :r:

while I am waiting for my book club book to come to the bookstore (forever by pete hamill) I have been reading "a Fifth of an Orange" by the author who wrote Chocolat, it's a very good read!
 

Coragus

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I never got through "The Geography of Nowhere", so I'm reading that now. Considering the nature of the text, I think it's kind of funny that I've read most of what I've gotten through from the inside of two chain restaurants, one of which is a McDonald's.
 
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