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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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11,251
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52
I started reading Freakonomics earlier this week. I had been wanting to read it for some time and finally decided to go to the library and check it out. I hope to finish it up early this weekend.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
Points
30
Next up will be Bill McKibben's latest book, Deep Economy.

Finished Deep Economy this weekend. It is an excellent book and even if you drop out the "Global Warming" aspects of the book, he makes some very very very prudent decisions and observations concerning energy consumption and our consolidated food systems. I love the giving of examples. McKibben, Jacobs, Putnam, Kunstler, etc... are always very good at providing examples that make sense on a very basic level that people can relate to. It's a good read and I ran out to subscribe in a CSA this morning.

I couldn't agree more with his hyper-individualist observations and our internal conflict between needing to be an individual yet longing for community. Personally, I have always been about community and sacrifice for the greater good, so this is just common sense to me.

my book club read this last summer - I liked it but nobody else did in my group - :r:

I'm finishing up February and I like it so far. I should get a culinary dictionary to try to keep up with it though. ;-) This book should come with recipies in an appendix and footnotes for the moderate hedonists among us.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
I'm now reading R.U.R - Rossum's Universal Robots by Karel Čapek.

I'm not sure if anybody here has ever read any of his other work but War With The Newts is one of my absolute favorites... Its like a mix of Animal Farm and Brave New World rolled into one and must have been among the works that inspired both Huxley and Orwell.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Exile

This Bear is reading Exile, by Richard North Patterson. I have been a fan of his books, saw this on a rack, and quickly scarfed.

An American lawyer, a Jew, has an affair (during law school) with a Palestinian woman. Years later they meet again, in less-than-pleasant circumstances. She is involved in terrorism.

First book in a while to keep me away from MR. INTERNET for long periods of time.

Bear
 

Monamogolo

Cyburbian
Messages
188
Points
7
Life from kids' perspective in a London "sink estate"

Elizbeth George (the detective story writer) gives a very poignant account of the life of three kids in a London sink estate, in her book What came before he shot her. You catch glimpses of the impact of both spatial planning and housing policy, but also of the role of social welfare and police in these areas.
I come away almost feeling guilt at the privileges I have had of having a solid family situation and a relatively good neighbourhood. But also humbled by the responsibility planners have to create decent living environments.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
Points
30
9-21-07

Finished - A Year in Provence - Peter Mayle
Started - The Economy of Cities - Jane Jacobs
On the Shelf - Various... including A Brave New World and A Brave New World Revisited along with various philosophy texts and a couple of poetry collections from 19th century brits.
 

Captain Worley

Cyburbian
Messages
271
Points
10
Just finished F Paul Wilson's Harbingers. This guy can write a good actionsupernatural tale.

I'm currently reading the Mechanical Engineering Review Manual. I'm taking my professional engineering exam at the end of October, and hoping to pass first try, I have a feeling that's just about all I'll be reading this month, although I am planning on ordering the latest Unce John's Bathroom Reader and Earth Without Us for after the test.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
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30
Finished - The Economy of Cities - Jane Jacobs
Started - A biography of Soren Kierkengaard - by can't remember (some philosophy professor I think)
On the Shelf - Various... including A Brave New World and A Brave New World Revisited along with various philosophy texts and a couple of poetry collections from 19th century brits.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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30,148
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74
Started - A biography of Soren Kierkengaard - by can't remember (some philosophy professor I think)
I always feel humbled reading about Kierkegaard. Here was guy who is pretty much condsidered the father of existentialism who was already writing brilliant works that affected the course of western philosphy when he was only in his late 20's/early 30's. I think he was only around 44 or thereabouts when he died.
 

luckless pedestrian

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55
I will be reading Spymistress: The Life of Vera Atkins, the Greatest Female Secret Agent of World War II by William Stevenson for my book club meeting November 1st - :) - I am waiting for it to come in at the bookstore -
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
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30
I always feel humbled reading about Kierkegaard. Here was guy who is pretty much condsidered the father of existentialism who was already writing brilliant works that affected the course of western philosphy when he was only in his late 20's/early 30's. I think he was only around 44 or thereabouts when he died.

Yeah, as I've been reading about him and his concept of the "aesthetic man" moving toward the "spiritual man" and why some lack the intellect to move beyond the "aesthetic man", I find concepts that I have recognized either through my own thoughts. My next literary purchase ??? An anthology of Kierkegaard's works. I don't think the anthology includes his personal journal, which I would also find very interesting.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Exile

This Bear finished EXILE, by Richard North Patterson. It took me awhile and I would love to blame that slow reading progression on a very busy schedule. What slows my reading way down are books with historical or political backdrops. I keep re-reading passages, so I fully understand.

Even though it is a novel, it offers very detailed explanations of why that part of the world claimed by Israel is so tumultous. The book does not take sides,

Very well done and damx scary.

Bear
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Even though I am supposed to be being good and only reading school books and not buying books, i have had a relapse

Just finished include

The Gum Thief - Douglas Coupland - good, but not his best
Spiral - 2nd book in the ring trilogy, not as good as teh first one. Think it may be due to a poor translation.

Currently reading - The Android's Dream - by Scalzi, he definitely wants to be the king of modern pulp sci-fi which is fine by me.

On deck

Loop - the 3rd of the ring trilogy
Humpty Dumpty in Oakland - Phillip K Dick - his stuff is so hit and miss, hopefully this one is good.
America - G*d, Gold and Golem - graphic novel by sturm, already have the golem story, but the other 2 looked good.

And of course school books.
 

Carl Kandy

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
I just finished MEANS OF ASCENT the first volume of Robert Caro's Lyndon Johnson books. What a character! Or lack thereof! Anyhow, Caro's a marvelous writer.
Decided to go fiction with my next choice so I'm reading THE KNOWN WORLD by Edward P Jones, a novel about Black slaveowners on a Virginia plantation. An uncommon but not unheard-of phenomenon, apparently. It's an excellent novel, packed with vivid characters and riveting incidents. Also, of course, very sad. I think it won a National Book Award a couple years ago.
 

hilldweller

Cyburbian
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3,863
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23
Just finished The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson. An excellent read, must visit Chicago asap!
 

Twoaday

Cyburbian
Messages
43
Points
2
Holy Trinity:)

I just finished Geography of Nowhere, Asphalt Nation and Suburban Nation. What a great month of reading that was!
 

zman

Cyburbian
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9,244
Points
33
^^ Ironically... I am reading The Vanishing Automobile and Other Urban Myths right now. ;) Next is Suburban Nation and hopefully some resolution to my thoughts about Planning and its effect on Individualism. (but that may be the topic of another thread...)

For my fun book, I am reading Wolf Willow by Wallace Stegner. Such a great way of writing, I never thought that the surveying of the 49th paralell (US-Canadian Border) could be so interesting and poetic.
 

luckless pedestrian

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Just finished The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson. An excellent read, must visit Chicago asap!

my book club read this - I loved it too and passed it on to another friend :) -

I loved the parallel between the horror of the crime(s) and the chaos of the construction and planning of the World's Fair - he really did a great job with that - it's amazing that the World's Fair ever really went off and it is equally amazing how long it took before an eyebrow was raised about that psychopath!
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
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10,199
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52
i just finished Life of Pi for the second time. very interesting book. i might have to read it a third time to try to figure out what really is going on.

i just started Sex Wars by Marge Percy?. blah. it is very slow and i'm only reading it because i don't have any other books easily accessible.
 

Maister

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I guess I'll calll it 'comfort reading' (sorta like comfort food), but I'm going through some tough times now and decided as a result it was time to start rereading the Aubrey- Maturin series (you know, the "Master & Commander" books).

Returning to these books for me is sorta like spending time getting together again with old friends. I get the same thing from rereading Lord of the Rings.
 

Twoaday

Cyburbian
Messages
43
Points
2
more books

I just finised "The University and Urban Revival: Out of the Ivory Tower and Into the Streets" which I thought was a very good read and have now started Dark Age Ahead by Jane Jacobs
 

johnelsden1

Member
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416
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13
"Cross" by James Patterson..............first time I have read one of his books........excellent........couldn't put it down........you will love it!
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,300
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44
Last book I finished was "Golf my own damn way" by John Daly.
I have Alice Waters recent cookbook that looks good and I'll start soon.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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Next up is Foundation and Empire by Asimov

read Foundation already, then Second Foundation will be next after F&E.

I love $0.50 paperbacks from the Library book sale.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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I have been pretty hedonistic lately with my pleasure reading.

Here is a list of recent books

Robert Sawyer - Rollback / Mindscan/ currently reading Flashforward
Philip K. Dick - Humpty Dumpty in Oakland
Koji Suzuki - Spiral , soon to read loop
John Scalzi - The Android's Dream

and a few less than fun to read books on Oprah Winfrey for an essay.
 

kaleb

Member
Messages
17
Points
1
I'm currently reading "Hegemony or Survival" by the Chomsky. Also just finished up Pattern Recognition by William Gibson.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
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6,287
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35
I'm about 2/3 of the way through "Caught between the Dog and the Fireplug, or How to Survive Public Service" by Kenneth Ashworth.

Excellent so far!

It's written as a series of letters to a niece that is embarking on Public Admin/similar studies. He keeps the advice - very valuable advice - flowing through each letter, and I've found myself nodding my head in agreement several times. And the last letter/chapter I read opened my eyes on how to "walk with kings". The amusing real stories he tells to drive home his point highlight his vast experience.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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6,655
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28
In keeping with the holiday season I am reading "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. I think someone made a movie out of it once or twice.

Please don't spoil the ending for me! :-x :-D
 

Captain Worley

Cyburbian
Messages
271
Points
10
Just finished Endless Night by Richard Laymon. Violent, gory book. Pretty good if you are into that sort of thing. I just discovered Laymon and enjoy his books.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Currently reading "Look Me in the Eye: A Life with Asperger's" by John Elder Robison.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
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2,531
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25
currently reading Rivethead by Ben Hamper. About life working in a plant in Flint. A lot of my relatives were (are) factory workers so an interesting read. Its got to be tough, menial labor and mind numbingly dull. On the other hand they were well paid for unskilled labor and they got away with an awfull lot... I have mixed feelings on the whole thing, but an interesring insight into a world which is largely becoming a thing of the past.
 

hilldweller

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3,863
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Currently reading Paddy's Lament, a book about the Irish Potato Famine. According to the author, the British pretty much starved the Irish out of Ireland.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
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10,199
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52
currently reading Island at the Center of the World by Russell Shorto.

from the publisher, "The Island at the Center of the World is all of this. In a landmark work of history that is also thrilling storytelling, Russell Shorto "deconstructs" Manhattan, transforming it from the concrete-and-glass center of global power to a wooded wilderness island, home to wolves and bear, hunting ground for Indians. On this strategically located island, a largely forgotten collection of smugglers, traders, prostitutes, pirates, and entrepreneurs formed America's original melting pot, and created a society that helped shape the nation that was to come. The Island at the Center of the World gives a startling new perspective on American beginnings."
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,895
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27
currently reading Island at the Center of the World by Russell Shorto.

That is a great book - I loved it. People often forget about New York's Dutch heritage, perhaps because so many original documents from that time were lost or burned, or because the facts were deliberately distorted by the incoming Brits. It was a fascinating time. *Enjoy* :)
 

Carl Kandy

Member
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43
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2
THE LAY OF THE LAND by Richard Ford. A novel about a New Jersey realtor dealing with mortality, marriage, memories. Great descriptions of Garden State life, sprawl to shining sea.
 

Maister

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Finished "Golden Compass", now reading "Subtle Knife" and next up is "Amber Spyglass" and then I'll be done with P. Pullman's His Dark Material series.

Many folks are comparing Pullman to CS Lewis. Color me unimpressed so far.
 

Gedunker

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My mother-in-law gave my wife Jenny McCarthy's Louder Than Words about 'healing' her son's autism. I read it in a few hours and I'll give her credit for a being a driven mom. And that's all I'll say about that.

I gave my wife the book hceux was reading Look Me in the Eyes which she is devouring (considering she mostly reads pulp fiction).

I'm still trudging through 1491, which my SS gave me this year. Let's just say it's a dense read -- along the lines of a 400-level college text.
 

ofos

Vintage Cyburbian
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8,278
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28
Blew the dust off the old bookcase and started re-reading Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor. Historical novel about the Confederate prisoner of war camp in Andersonville, GA. No special incentive for reading it again, just like to cycle through my old books periodically and figure out why I still own them.
 

otterpop

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Last night I started reading True Believer by Nicholas Sparks. My mom gave it to my wife for Christmas but my wife doesn't read books written in English. I started reading it while my son as in his karate class. The book flows pretty well and the story is interesting.

Also winding down on Huckleberry Finn. I have been reading about a half a chapter every night to my son. Probably the third or fourth time I have read it. I gave my son The Adventures of Tom Sawyer for Christmas.

Huck and Tom Sawyer are good role models for a young boy. Huck teaches a boy some of what it takes to be a good man and Tom teaches him it is okay to be a boy - a little wild, full of mischief and imaginative.
 

WSU MUP Student

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I asked for The World Is Flat by Thomas Friedman for Christmas thinking that I could get it read before classes start back up next week. Little did I know that it is a 600+ page book.

I am about 1/3 through it but only have a few more days until classes begin. Thankfully the television writers' strike has caused all of my favorite distractions to go into reruns giving me a bit of a fighting chance to finish this behemoth!
 

Maister

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Finished "Golden Compass", now reading "Subtle Knife" and next up is "Amber Spyglass" and then I'll be done with P. Pullman's His Dark Material series.

Many folks are comparing Pullman to CS Lewis. Color me unimpressed so far.
Update. I retract this earlier statement - Golden Compass did not impress but the storyline unfolding in 'Subtle Knife' proves it to be a worthy allegory as good, if not better, than anything Lewis has to offer in Narnia
 

tsc

Cyburbian
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1,900
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23
Reading right now the 'The Te of Piglet' ...the follow up of "The Tao of Pooh" ....the Pooh book was better. Many more anaologies between tao and pooh.
 

luckless pedestrian

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I am 2 weeks behind my book club: :-$

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

even though they already discussed it, I am reading it anyway - it's very good - he's a tough guy to figure out :-o:

from Barnes & Noble dot com:

In April 1992, a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. He had given $25,000 in savings to a charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet and invented a life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. Jon Krakauer brings Chris McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows and illuminates it with meaning in this mesmerizing and heartbreaking tour de force.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,937
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Went to Toronto over the holidays and stocked up on books from my favourite cheapy bookstore, so I've got lots to plow through now. Just started "The Yiddish Policeman's Union" (thanks for the recommendation Tresmo!). An entertaining read so far.
 
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