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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Palisades Park by Alan Brennert. It's a novel following a family from the 1920's onward, and much of their life/work is connected to an old-fashioned amusement park in NJ. It's pretty good so far.

I did not know until I read the Author's Notes at the end of the book that a lot of the "characters" in the book were real people, either at Palisades Park or peripheral people the novelized central family in the book encountered.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
RJ and I just finished Michael Zuckoff's "Frozen in Time" which tells the story of a series of military plane crashes in Greenland during WWII, the attempts to rescue survivors, and also the modern-day search for one of the planes. Very interesting, and some history I was only vaguely aware of.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
" The Astronaut Wives Club" by Lily Koppel. I know, it sounds like chick lit, but it's the true story of some of the astronauts' wives, starting with with the announcement of the Mercury 7 in '59. Very interesting.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,895
Points
27
Apparently no one except ZG and I has read any books in the last few weeks. ;)

My latest is a memoir by writer Kate Christensen: Blue Plate Special, An Autobiography of My Appetites. It's not as food-focused as I thought it would be, but that's fine. I stayed up late last night reading it... had to force myself to turn off the light & go to sleep!
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,462
Points
30
I read "The Snow Child" a couple of weeks ago and recommend it if you are in the mood for a fiction book with a slight fairy-tale twist to it, set in a remote Alaskan outpost in the 1920's. I really enjoyed the setting. I put off reading it because it sounded like it had a sad ending, but it didn't really (or wasn't as sad as I was expecting it to be).
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
After not posting on Cyburbia for years, I was pleased to see that this thread is still going.

I just finished reading Charlie LeDuff's "Detroit: An American Autopsy". What a heart-wrenching book to read. It made me question if it's morally right for me to have been so intensely curious about Detroit especially on the reasons why it has fallen so far from its roaring days and how it seems to have grown its own culture especially through music.

The next book that I'm wanting to read is Straphangr by Taras Grescoe.
 
Messages
5
Points
0
I just recently finished Derek Gregory's Geographical Imaginations. Really fantastic critical engagement with the social theories of the past 100 years (with an emphasis on "postmodernism" debates of the 1980's) that have influenced the disciplines of geography, sociology, art, philosophy, and planning.

I think i'm going to start E.L. Doctorow's Waterworks next. I've read Ragtime, The Book of Daniel, and The March, and really enjoyed them. He is fast becoming my fiction infatuation.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Linda Fairstein's "Death Angel", the latest in the Alex Cooper mystery/thriller series. This one takes place in Central Park in NYC and there is a lot of info about the development of the park way back when.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,832
Points
25
Mailman by J. Robert Lennon. Set in a fictionalized Ithica it is true to many of Dan's descriptions.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Just finished "Consider the Fork:A History of How We Cook and Eat" by Bee Wilson. It got good reviews and I got it for RJ as a gift, but he lost interest. I thought it was fascinating. Chapters include Pots & Pans, Knife, Grind, Ice, and Kitchen. Much more interesting than you would think.

Now into a novel by Linda Bloodworth Thomason (creator of "Designing Women") from '04, "Liberating Paris" about a small town in Arkansas when the offspring of two former lovers become engaged. I'm really liking this one.
 

Midori

Cyburbian
Messages
751
Points
12
Starting Night Comes to the Cumberlands by Caudill, on the suggestion of Linda_D. Thanks for the suggestion--it's wonderfully written. It may take me forever to finish because I keep stopping to read passages out loud to my husband.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,619
Points
53
I'm reading some great intellectual fare, a Star Wars book with a horror theme.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Come On Shore And We Will Kill and Eat You All, by Christina Thompson

I just had to read it because of the title alone. And it is about New Zealand.
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,462
Points
30
For some reason I was on a classics kick so read Anna Karenina (maybe my favorite book now) and Great Expectations (highly enjoyed). Now on to something from the past decade, The Story of Edgar Sawtelle... I couldn't pass up Stephen King's ringing endorsement on the back cover.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Free Food for Millionaires by Min Jin Lee. It's a novel about a Korean family (parents immigrants, adult daughters U.S-born) in NYC and their relationships, conflicts, and different paths in life. It's very good.
 

ursus

Cyburbian, raised by Cyburbians
Messages
5,070
Points
27
You're keeping count? :-c I'll post in advance, today I downloaded the new V.I. Warshawski by Sara Paretsky, so that's up next.

Yep, you're the only person I'm aware of who reads more than my daughter, "Madam President". So far you're still way out in front....;)
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
29
All done with the 3rd Harry Potter book. It was an OK read.

I've started reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. Not sure I'm going to finish it right now though. I started it as a stop-gap on my Kindle because I couldn't borrow any more books at the time through Amazon Prime.

I may just start on the 4th Potter book, especially since my daughter is already on number 6.

I stopped reading the Third Reich book and started on Goblet of Fire.

I just finished Goblet of Fire, the 4th Potter book. It's an OK series, but the books move incredibly slow.

My 10 year old daughter has already read the entire Potter series 2 times. She did this largely over the summer months.

Taking a break from Potter and I started Life of Pi last night. My wife recently finished it and absolutely hated it. I now have to read the book so I can validate or contradict her feelings, and so we can watch the movie.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
You're keeping count? :-c I'll post in advance, today I downloaded the new V.I. Warshawski by Sara Paretsky, so that's up next.

The Parestsky's on hold, since I got a really good haul at the library the other day. I'm currently reading Mary Kay Andrews' Ladies Night. I didn't like her last book since it was devoid of any humor after she'd written some hilarious books. But I like this one, not so funny, but good.

Her real name is Kathy Hogan Trocheck and she wrote a good mystery series about a cleaning service in Atlanta. I met her husband once when his development group brought a bad application into the county where I worked. I masterminded the denial of the application but that was a good thing.
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,238
Points
27
Picked up a new book yesterday written by a coworker. It is a story based upon his father, the united auto workers, and the mob. Much of it seems to mirror the experiences of my grandparents. I also bought a copy for my dad as part of the book is based in the neighborhood he grew up in.
 

jameshansenbc

Cyburbian
Messages
53
Points
4
I just finished Goblet of Fire, the 4th Potter book. It's an OK series, but the books move incredibly slow.

Problem was that by end of the third book, J.K.'s work was receiving a LOT of positive attention, and I think this made the editors very weary of cutting her work down to size, so the books became unnecessarily long by the 4th book and later. I found the 5th book unbearably long winded and I didn't read any more of the books after that, I also enjoyed the 5th movie far more than the book version.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,832
Points
25
Other People's Money by Charles Bagli. About what was the largest real estate deal in history the purchase of the massive Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village apartment complexes in Manhattan during the real estate boom. Deals with issues of affordable housing and gentrification and the complex's interesting history but ultimately the book gets a bit repetitive with financial info and greedy developers. Spoiler alert - things didn't turn out well for the buyers who spent over 5 billion just before the recession.

Also my daughter and I are almost done with the 1st Harry Potter. I still haven't seen any of the movies but we'll see it when we're done.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,619
Points
53
I'm double dipping right now between rereading the Lord of the Rings series and the new Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman. I think when I'm done I'll pass it along to some worthy Cyburbian.
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,462
Points
30
Read "Divergent" last week... eh, it was ok, I like Hunger Games better. Katniss beats Tris any day of the week. But I'll probably read the next two at some point.

Also read "Ghostwalk" by Rebecca Stott... I liked the historical / historical fiction parts about Newton, but I thought the whole "secret cadre of men controlling everything and blaming it all on an animal rights group" sounded too much like an X-Files episode.

Reading "Riven Rock" by T.C. Boyle right now, he's one of my favorites.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,619
Points
74
Lst night I picked up "The Man Who Invented Christmas: How Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits"
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Fannie Flagg's new novel: The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion. I'm only about 30% in and have no idea where it's going, but I'm liking it.
 

shess

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
The width and arrangements of streets - a study in town planning, Charles Mulford Robinson

This is a harrowing tale of crime and passion and a call to action.... wait, no it isn't. It is a 1910 book written about Town Planning, with a focus on proper street widths. It is amazing to read 100 year old words that are decrying the plight of suburbia. It is an interesting read, and worth it if you are looking for justifiable information about building street standards into your code that reject the ultra-wide standards we have been saddled with for over 50 years.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,189
Points
60
Re-reading "Wooden, A lifetime of Observations and Reflections On and Off the Court." by John Wooden. I started it this morning and will likely finish before bed tonight.
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
29
I just finished Goblet of Fire, the 4th Potter book. It's an OK series, but the books move incredibly slow.

My 10 year old daughter has already read the entire Potter series 2 times. She did this largely over the summer months.

Taking a break from Potter and I started Life of Pi last night. My wife recently finished it and absolutely hated it. I now have to read the book so I can validate or contradict her feelings, and so we can watch the movie.

I finished Life of Pi several weeks ago. I thought it was a pretty good read and I liked it much better than my wife did. However, I don't think it was the earth shattering book that it was made out to be. We subsequently watched the movie and it was OK. Maybe because it has a spiritual/religious underpinning to it, I immediately because cynical of the book.

I've been reading the 5th Potter book since then, Order of the Phoenix. I'm only about a quarter of the way and I just can't get into it. But I will struggle through.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,619
Points
53
I finished Life of Pi several weeks ago. I thought it was a pretty good read and I liked it much better than my wife did. However, I don't think it was the earth shattering book that it was made out to be. We subsequently watched the movie and it was OK. Maybe because it has a spiritual/religious underpinning to it, I immediately because cynical of the book.

I've been reading the 5th Potter book since then, Order of the Phoenix. I'm only about a quarter of the way and I just can't get into it. But I will struggle through.

Can't say Life of Pi was a great book, but interesting. I loved the Harry Potter books though.

Still re-reading Lord of the Rings. I forget how long the series was.
Also reading Paddle Your Own Canoe when I get a chance. Not bad as biographies/memoirs go.
 

btrage

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
29
Can't say Life of Pi was a great book, but interesting. I loved the Harry Potter books though.

Still re-reading Lord of the Rings. I forget how long the series was.
Also reading Paddle Your Own Canoe when I get a chance. Not bad as biographies/memoirs go.

I've never actually read the Lord of the Rings series. I read the Hobbit as a kid, but never the trilogy. I suggested the books as an Xmas gift for my 10-year old. Hopefully she gets them so I can read them!
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
I've been reading Erewhon by Samuel Butler to my son at bedtime. It is a work of satire, poking fun at Victorian times and practices by turning the civilization on its head. For example, in Erewhon (Nowhere), sickness is a crime and crime is a sickness.The book takes a major swipe at organized religion and other aspects of past and present civilization.

It is a very old paperback copy that I have. Every time I turn the page, it separates from the binding. So I am accumulating a pile of pages on the night stand. When I get to the end of the book, I am going to incorporate the pages into newspaper logs. I gave myself a newspaper log maker for Xmas.

A moral dilemma: Is it book burning if you burn a book because it is no longer viable as a book? Is throwing it in the trash any more acceptable?

Last night I finished When London Walked in Terror, a non-fiction work about Jack the Ripper.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,619
Points
74
Last night I read Dickens' famous short story 'Christmas Carol' for only the second time. I can see why the story continues to hold modern interests in a Shakespearean way....the subject matter is pretty timeless and universal.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,619
Points
53
I'm reading an exciting book called Router Fundamentals (the woodworking kind). Yeah, I'm bored.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
John Grisham's new novel, Sycamore Row, and Henry Bushkin's Johnny Carson, two of the three books RJ got me for Christmas. Bushkin was Carson's lawyer for years, and I remember Carson talking about him on his show.

Next up: Stephen King's Doctor Sleep.

:D
 
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