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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,469
Points
31
Am halfway through The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin. Recommended so far, I really enjoy the setting, distinct characters, and the lyrical pace/descriptions of their lives working with the land and horses, but with the sense that something dramatic and unexpected is just around the corner.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,984
Points
71

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Indeed, it is intense, fast moving, very graphic, paints greats images with her words.

I was rooting for Wily.

Reading Christopher Reich's novel The Prince of Risk, first book of his I've read, and enjoying it. The Treasury Secretary, and heads of the NYSE and Federal Reserve, are blown up on the White House lawn, and the mystery is on...
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
45
ummmmhhhhh this is like a long time to not know what Zoning Goddess is reading. I know you're reading, I just don't know what. How am i supposed to go about my day, attending to the affairs of my life without knowing what you are reading?!?!?? I know you finished your book and started again because it takes you like three days to read 6000 pages, so what gives? Ok, I see. Now you're just toying with me, not saying what you're reading. Is it good? I can't see the cover...just come on! Tell me! Tell me! What are you READING!?!??!??!!!! I'll find your book and burn it if you don't tell me!!! Never mind, I don't care. I couldn't care less what you're reading..OK that's a lie, what are you reading!?!? I'm going to start typing gibberish all over this thread if you don't tell me. It'll be your fault. I can't be blamed. It's on you. Gibberish on your hands, ZG. Fine. Gibberish it is. I'll bring the gibberish, Oh, I can bring it baby. Bringin on the gibberish. What do you mean I already started? That's just unnecessary roughness. Are you reading a sports book? Is that why your silence on the matter is so aggressive? Silence can so be aggressive. Watch. Feel that? Uh huh that's what I'm saying. See? Aggressive, silent, gibberish.





please tell me what you're reading.....

She's on a self-imposed hiatus.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
I am reading Buddenbrooks, by Thomas Mann. I was actually supposed to read it in for this European Literature class I took as undergraduate, but the prof's reading list was such a bear, the class never got to reading it. I found it while cleaning out my old room in my folk's house and decided I might as well do it. We didn't get to the Proust either, so I should read that one too. But maybe not until next year. I can only take so much of that high-faul-oot-en leetachour at a time.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,895
Points
27
It only took me a few days to read the latest Nevada Barr, Destroyer Angel. I couldn't put it down.

I'm reading a novel now that's taken me awhile to get into. Title: Canada.

I am reading Buddenbrooks, by Thomas Mann. I was actually supposed to read it in for this European Literature class I took as undergraduate, but the prof's reading list was such a bear, the class never got to reading it. I found it while cleaning out my old room in my folk's house and decided I might as well do it. We didn't get to the Proust either, so I should read that one too. But maybe not until next year. I can only take so much of that high-faul-oot-en leetachour at a time.

Oh, wow. I think I had to read that one for in freshman studies in college... a long time ago.
 

ursus

Cyburbian, raised by Cyburbians
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5,070
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27
Ursus, you're a nut. Sue Monk Kidd's The Invention of Wings.

Ha! You caved, and told me. I like people that regularly use all three names. I can't remember which book it was you suggested for my daughter, but Madame President found a copy at her favorite haunt (the Paperback Exchange) and is posed to begin later this month. I'll fill you in if she likes it. :)
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
Points
40
Ha! You caved, and told me. I like people that regularly use all three names. I can't remember which book it was you suggested for my daughter, but Madame President found a copy at her favorite haunt (the Paperback Exchange) and is posed to begin later this month. I'll fill you in if she likes it. :)

Greg Iles Natchez Burning..791 pages, not 6000. Sheesh.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
45
I finished I Don't Care if We Never Get Back by Ben Blatt and Eric Brewster. 30 baseball parks in 30 days. Fun read.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Hard Road West

I am readingf Hard Road West, by Keith Heyer Meldahl. It is a book about the history and geology of the Oregon and California Emigrant Trails. How the physical world affected westward expansion is a topic that interests me.

Reading the book inspired me to take my three-day weekend to go down to Idaho and see for myself some of the challenges those pioneers faced. Melded well with my trip last year to Wyoming and Utah, exploring the Oregon and Mormon Trail sites.

For the modern day traveller, Big Hill and the Hudspeth Cutoff are just scenic drives. But for those pioneers, getting down Big Hill could cost you your life and the Hudspeth Cutoff was a grueling up and down journey over several mountain ranges.
 

Maister

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30,677
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74
Has anyone ever read an author multiple times like, say, Tolkien, and find themselves disliking and finding the author's writing faults magnified a dozen fold?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Has anyone ever read an author multiple times like, say, Tolkien, and find themselves disliking and finding the author's writing faults magnified a dozen fold?

Not Tolkien, and I've re-read him for 45 years. I don't read many authors multiple times.

Book I'm reading: David Rosenfelt's "Dogtripping". If you love dogs or are involved in pet rescues, you'll enjoy this book. The theme is the author and his wife moving from CA to ME with their 25 dogs, with the back story of how/why they have the dogs and their involvement in shelters/rescues. Sometimes sad, but also very funny. Highly recommended.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Has anyone ever read an author multiple times like, say, Tolkien, and find themselves disliking and finding the author's writing faults magnified a dozen fold?

Only example I can think of in my case would be Louis L'Amour. My mom loved his books, so there were plenty at our house. I read a half dozen or so. I came to dislike them because he was a pretty shitty one dimensional writer. Hondo is actually a decent book, though
 

Maister

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30,677
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74
I've never read Jack London. Shall I read Call of the Wild?
 

Pegguy11

Cyburbian
Messages
59
Points
4
Currently Im reading One Hundred Years of Solitude in preperation for my grade 12 major paper in fall, and also Jeff Specks Walkalbe City as my pleasure book with a little of Silent Spring on the side.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,832
Points
25
Jarred Diamond - Guns, Germs & Steel.

I am also fizzling out on the Complete Works of Franz Kafka. I'm all Kafka'd out midway through.
 

ursus

Cyburbian, raised by Cyburbians
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5,070
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27
OK, I'm going to go "Book-Y" for a minute because I'm excited. I was at a small antique store yesterday afternoon in St. Charles, ID and happened to find a leather bound copy of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. Given to a girl as a gift from her father in 1920. Inside the pages there was a photograph, and a newspaper clipping about the testimony of a woman accused of poisoning her lover by slipping something in his highball? Can you say Perry Mason?

My father had a little paperback copy of the Rubaiyat and told me to read it when I was 19. Years later I wanted to read it again, but he couldn't find his copy. The lady at the antique store sold this to me for $9.00. My dad will cry when I give it to him. :)
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
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4,895
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27
I'm reading The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps. Really good so far.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
Points
40
Another third in a trilogy arrived this evening: Lev Grossman's The Magician's Land. Hate to see these two trilogies end.

In the meantime, reading Kate Atkinson's Life After Life. It's about a woman born in 1910 who can sense and alter her life to avoid hideous outcomes, so it's very circular and slightly repetitive and very fascinating, enjoying it very much.

I used the word "very" too much.
 
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otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Seth Bullock: Black Hills Lawman by David A. Wolff. Former Montana sheriff, deputy U.S. Marshal, Deadwood marshal, forester, Rough Rider and a really, really cranky man on the HBO show "Deadwood."
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,898
Points
29
Book club read -- Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas by James Patterson.

I'm not sure it's really my style but... the brunch (I mean discussion) at the end should be good.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,300
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45
Unbroken; The WWII Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand.

This book is riveting. Bomber crews in the Pacific during the Big War.
 

ursus

Cyburbian, raised by Cyburbians
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5,070
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27
Paul Johnson "Darwin: Portrait of a Genius"

Is it wrong that when I see portraits of Darwin I'm always fairly alarmed that his genes managed to move forward through time to create him? He's....well.....ugly, and I would have imagined his ancestors would have been selected for extinction.
 

kjel

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46
Stieg Larsson's "Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest". Third book of the "Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" trilogy. Great reading.

Recently finished Donna Tart's "The Goldfinch" which was a page turner although the ending was much slower in tempo.

Figuring out what to read next!
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,295
Points
24
Is it wrong that when I see portraits of Darwin I'm always fairly alarmed that his genes managed to move forward through time to create him? He's....well.....ugly, and I would have imagined his ancestors would have been selected for extinction.

The vast majority of pictures that you see of Darwin were taken when he was an old man. Judge gently! Donald Prothero made this point in his book Evolution: What the Fossils Say And Why It Matters.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,631
Points
53
Taking a break from the usual sci-fi/fantasy crap I read for the ABZs of Planning Management. We'll see if I learn anything new.
 

kjel

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46
Just finished The Fault in Our Stars. Nothing earth shattering, but well written and I enjoyed it. No, I haven't seen the movie and don't plan too.
 

ursus

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Just finished The Fault in Our Stars. Nothing earth shattering, but well written and I enjoyed it. No, I haven't seen the movie and don't plan too.

I've been curious if the book credits the line to JM Barrie's play. "The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves."

(I had remembered it from Barrie, not realizing it was taken by Barrie basically from Shakespeare.)
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,065
Points
32
James A. Michener's Caravans. Set in post WWII Afghanistan. Written in the 60s. I read it in high school and considered a career in the foreign service. Decided to read it again for a better understanding of the middle east. Wow! The recent atrocities are not new, not even old...they are ancient.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
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28
The Last Kind Words Saloon by Larry McMurtry. I didn't know it was possible for Larry McMurtry to write a bad book, but he did. The title was the only good part about it. It seemed slapdash and without a plot. He gets the Earps and Doc Holliday totally wrong and has Buffalo Bill an old man at a time when he was actually about 34 and barely beginning, rather than at the end of his stardom as a showman. Besides that Buffalo Bill contributes nothing to the story anyway.
 

HallyM

BANNED
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2
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0
I've just finished reading Us by David Nicholls and really enjoyed it. He's such a good writer, funny, sensitive, creates wonderful characters... one of those books that has you laughing out loud and crying a moment afterward. Would definitely recommend.
 
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