What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

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Lisa Lutz's "Trail of the Spellmans". It's the 5th in a series about an odd family of P.I.s. and they're all hilarious. I figured I'd better get the bag of library books out of the way before starting the new John Grisham.
 
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I'm almost done with the 5th book in the Game of Thrones universe. I'm sad that I have to wait for the next installment. Overall I have been very impressed, I haven't been this emotionally attached to a fantasy series in many years. I listen to the audiobook in the car, then read the paper version at home just to get to the next chapter. There's slow spots, inevitable in a ~5,000 page book, but they are heavily outweighed by some seriously shocking, touching, or hilarious moments.

The HBO series is also excellent, but just a little different. I think it is made much better by knowing the books, there is a ton of excellent backstory and context that is necessarily left out in the shorter TV scripts (and some excellent shortcuts to show as much as possible in the visual medium). Like the LOTR movies, I think the TV series is the best that can be expected of converting one art to another. I hope they keep the quality high and I can't wait to see certain things put on the screen.
 
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I just finished American Canopy by Eric Rutkow. It's about how we fucked this continent for its tree canopy. Some good land use discussions, too. One thing missing is how the northern California timber barons ruined the north coast redwood forests with the pinnacle being the assclown Maxxam Company. :-{ :-@
 
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Starting "The Trouble with City Planning - What New Orleans Can Teach Us" by Kristina Ford. Got to slip in a planning book once in a while.
 
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Jeanne Ray's "Calling Invisible Women". It's a novel. I've mentioned before how you hit middle-age, and suddenly seem invisible to younger people, sales clerks, etc. This book is narrated by a doctor's wife who actually becomes physically invisible. So far it's hilarious.
 

btrage

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Over the weekend, I finished Theodore Rex, the 2nd in a trilogy by Edmund Morris about the life of Teddy Roosevelt. It doesn't matter what you think of him politically, and how his progressive ideas were contrary to the conservatism of the time, he was/is simply one of the most fascinating Presidents we will ever have.
I'm now reading Colonel Roosevelt, the 3rd book in Morris' trilogy.

So far not as interesting as the first 2 books. It chronicles the last days of Roosevelt's life, including his split from the Republican party.
 

ofos

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Alex Haley - Roots It's been many years since I saw the mini-series and I don't think that I ever read the book. All the dialect makes it a difficult read.
 

Maister

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Finishing up 'The Hobbit' (maybe the 8th time I've read it)
next up: Bryan Sykes' controversial ''DNA USA"
 
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I am reading to my son "The Garden of Rama," the third in the Rama series. Also reading "Kennedy's Gold," a good-ole-fashioned oater about a stagecoach beset by marauding Apaches.
 

JNA

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Has anybody seen or read

Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds
by Jim Sterba

sounds interesting.
 
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Also re-reading it for the nth time. Can't see how it can be made into a film trilogy without boring people to death with either excruciating detail or special effects.
Me,either, it's such a quick read, much shorter than the other 3 books.

I've started "City of Dark Magic" by Magnus Flyte, after reading a bunch of good reviews.
 
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