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Book club 📖 What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,461
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29
Whose Yur Planner said:
Bought and started to read Neuromancer by Gibson, the first cyber punk sci-fi novel. Still a good read 21 years after it was published.

See up-thread quite a ways. A lot of Gibson fans here. I really liked edit: Pattern Recognition Language, his latest.

Currently reading an Iain M. Banks Space Opera. Pretty fun.
 
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otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
"Horton Hatches An Egg," "To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street" and "Babar The King." My son is four.:D
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
On the night stand right now

Haevey Pekar - The Quitter - more autobiographical angst from the author of american splendour.

Dan Clowes - Ice Haven - tales from eighball, odd tales from an odd guy. With his common theme of alienation from others, while lusting for companionship.

Wild Ducks Flying Backwards - Tom Robbins - a collection of his commercial writings and short stories. Have read the first half, pretty good, but he is a bit out there.

Rational Unified Process Made Simple. Software buddies suggested reading it to see if an Analyst job is for me. Tough sledding, but somewhat interesting.

Still picking my way through Born to Kvetch. Tough reading, but generally interesting book on the relationship between yiddish and jewish culture.
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,777
Points
24
Trying to read the new Diana Gabaldon book, but I having a hard time remembering back to the previous books.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,295
Points
24
Bought "New Rules" by Bill Maher. Read it in two days. I'm not really a democratic wonk, but I laughed pretty hard at some of his stuff.
 

Senior Jefe

Cyburbian
Messages
431
Points
13
I'm currently reading "What's the Matter with Kansas" by Thomas Frank. It the best explanation of the current Republican control of our National government that I have read. As someone who grew up in Kansas I am familiar with the towns and cities that Frank uses for examples, however it can be applied to almost any place in the US. Recommended reading for liberal political wonks. I am also reading "London 1900", a description of the city and society at the height of the empire. Any tourist can see the historical artifacts of empire everywhere you go in London and this book helps explain a very small portion of it. The reading is more academic than popular in style, hopefully the author got tenure for publishing it. I was reading "Guns, Germs and Steel" but halfway through, having the same basic theory retold over and over again, it got tiresome and I put it down.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,531
Points
60
Just finished A Box of Matches by Nicholson Baker and either read A Month of Sundays by John Updike or Samaritan by Richard Price.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
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31
Getting ready to read

The Good Fight - Declare Your Independence and close the democracy gap by Ralph Nader

Just finished rereading - I am Charlotte Simmons, great book
 
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185
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Zoning Goddess said:
Working on "The Historian" by Elizabeth Kostova. It got some really good reviews. It has 3 parallel stories about researching, and perhaps encountering, Vlad the Impaler (Dracula): a teenager in the '70's, her father in the '50's, and his mentor in the '30's.

I'm also reading this... slow in the begining- & I'm trying to decide whether I like it or not. Also, picked up the Chronicles of Narnia (to feed the child in me ;-))
 
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3,680
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Trail Nazi said:
Trying to read the new Diana Gabaldon book, but I having a hard time remembering back to the previous books.

i need to go read the other 5 again first - it's been way too long since the last book. however, i don't have a year's worth of time to lay around and read. :)

Just finished Jennifer Weiner's new book - Goodnight Nobody. Moms to toddlers should identify well with the book.

Can anyone give me a recommendation on Freakonomics?
 

geobandito

Cyburbian
Messages
509
Points
16
Admitting to reading an Oprah book.... The Dive From Clausen's Pier. Great premise, but no follow-through. I should have known better - it had a sticker on it proudly proclaiming that it had been made into a Lifetime movie.
 

transformer

Member
Messages
77
Points
4
Just read "A Peoples History of the United States" by Howard Zinn. My son read the book and recommended I read it. Did not agree with everything written, but it did open my eyes to a different perspective on American history.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,531
Points
25
Reading Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon Days. Much like an extended version of the News from Lake Wobegon segment from the Prarie Home Companion.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
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Moderator
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13,317
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55
jsk1983 said:
Reading Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon Days. Much like an extended version of the News from Lake Wobegon segment from the Prarie Home Companion.

i loved that book and i still love to listen to the show -
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
33
Currently plowing through a couple here:

Picked up The Truth with Jokes by Al Franken. Not really into reading it right now, and may let my mom borrow it and then I will finish it later.

Reading Lost Mountains: Climbs in the Himilaya by Stephen Venables, this book is a bargain bin special from Barnes and Noble and has given my a good peak into the Kashmir region and climbs that are focused upon other mountains instead of Everest or K2.

I have a huge list of books and/or subject I want to read about. But I am young and can take my time.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
bflo_la said:
Tom Robbins', "Jitterbug Perfume" and Terry Pratchett's "Going Postal"...


Jitterbug Perfume is a great book, especially the parts about the bike shop. ;)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,461
Points
29
bflo_la said:
Tom Robbins', "Jitterbug Perfume" and Terry Pratchett's "Going Postal"...

Should I feel honored that one of my more confused musings has been adopted as a sign line? :-c :p
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,167
Points
24
I just finished "A Home at the End of the World" by Michael Cunningham. Great book, great characters. I heard the movie sucks though.

I just picked up one of the McSweeney's anthologies (Dave Eggers & Co) from the library. I like hipster fiction. The stories are great so far, if maybe a little strange.
 

Boru

Cyburbian
Messages
235
Points
9
I am currently plodding my way through "Age of Extremes" by E. Hobsbaum. A very good tome. It is not a book I can just read straight through, but it gives an excellent perspective on the parts of the last century that I wasnt around for. It deals with the period 1914-1992. Pity it wasnt extended to these times. The man has an eye for detail it must be said.

Not much fiction these days what with the Thesis an' all. But I did read American Gods by Gaiman. I know BKM read it a while back. Good concept, sloppy ending.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
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13,843
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40
"The Undomestic Goddess" by Sophie Kinsella. The title alone sucked me into reading this one! :) (So far, it's pretty funny!)
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,961
Points
31
Starting to read "I sh!thead", the biography of the lead singer of DOA also have a Orson Scott Caird book of short stories for the flights I am on this week.
 

Breed

Cyburbian
Messages
589
Points
17
Boru said:
I am currently plodding my way through "Age of Extremes" by E. Hobsbaum. A very good tome. It is not a book I can just read straight through, but it gives an excellent perspective on the parts of the last century that I wasnt around for. It deals with the period 1914-1992. Pity it wasnt extended to these times. The man has an eye for detail it must be said.

That was our text for a World Civ class in college. I know it was very cerebral, but I was more interested in drinking at the time. It's one of those books that I always wanted to go back and really read... along with his other works: Age of Capital, Age of Revolution, and Age of Empire.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44
I finished The Closers by Michael Connelly on the flight today. OK, but not as good as his Lost Light, IMO.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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6,461
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29
Picked up again to actually read this time The Diamond Age, by Neil Stephenson. Interesting, but his conservative/libertarian politics are a little annoying.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
In the last month or so, I've been commuting an hour or more as I travelled back and forth between my apartment and the school where I was a student teacher, I read a few books on the bus or on the subway.

1. "Father Figure" by Richard Peck. It's a young adults book that I picked up at a library book sale sometimes back in high school and never got around reading it until recently. It wasn't glorious, but it wasn't bad either.

2. "The Don't Sweat Guide for Graduates: Facing New Challenges with Confidence" by Richard Carlson. I bought it in a goodwill store for 50 cents! I definitely got my 50 cents worth from the book. Only if I can just find that book once again...

3. Now, I'm reading "UTOpia: Towards a New Toronto" Edited by Jason McBride and Alana Wilcox. It's a "collection of essays by people who are passionate about Toronto" and it "contributes to a larger conversation that has been taking place in Toronto for decades. It's a frank discussion of the ways the city can best become itself, in all its variety, its history, and its intimacies". Yes, those are quotes that someone by the name of Anne Michaels wrote about the book, but I feel that these quotes are accurate and are better written than what I could whip up on the spot as I type this post out late at night.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,262
Points
30
Started : The Death of Ivan Ilych and Other Stories by Count Leo Tolstoy

I got a Waldenbooks/Borders gift card for Chistmas, so I will be reviewing this thread for good reading ideas.....
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
33
I am rifleing through about 4-5 books right now.
I will list them in order of "most interested in at the moment":
Life of Pi A good read, lent to me by a coworker.
Culture of Fear Found this in the Library, part of my "digging deeper" into societal trends phase
Voluntary Simpicity Part of the amending my life phase
Your Money or Your Life I found this title on an online Simple Living Forum, I briefly skimmed it so far, but I hear it is a pretty good read.
Runaway Jury Dime Sotre Grisham book, for when I don't feel like reading non-fiction.
Field Guide to American Houses Picked this up yesterday and found it to be helpful, not only with work, but also a prevailing interest in residential architecture.
Best Colorado Hikes with Dogs Something I will probably use during spring/summer.

Anyone else reading more than one book?
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
I am embarrassed to admit that I blazed through Clive Barker's The Hellbound Heart yesterday. Not sure why I like the Hellraiser series. I'm not really a big horror fan otherwise.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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9,323
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31
zmanPLAN said:
Anyone else reading more than one book?

RURAL RUSSIAN AFTER THE REVOLUTION
WAR & PEACE
RED VICTORY (A HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN CIVIL WAR)

Concerning the above-mentioned three (3).....I have read all three (3) but I keep going back to certain passages and chapters. I am doing this in conjunction with watching some History Channel presentations on these topics. I will have to say that W. Bruce Lincoln's RED VICTORY may be the scariest book I ever read. It goes right to the heart with the incredible stories of man's inhumanity to man, during the Russian Civil War.

ATLAS OF MICHIGAN (Edition Of 1976)
THE STAND
BEATLE'S ILLUSTRATED LYRICS

Santa Claus was supposed to bring me Bill Maher's book, NEW RULES. Since he was remiss in his red suit duties, I will have to wander over to the bookstore and pick it up.

Vladimar Bear
 

chukky

Cyburbian
Messages
363
Points
12
Bought this morning and finished this afternoon Boy in the Striped Pyjamas.

expected it to be somewhat less serious then it turned out to be.

poor kid.
 
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1,580
Points
21
Just finished:

The Island of Dr. Moreau

Ongoing:

Vitruvius' Ten Books of Architecture
Huxley's Island
Access All Areas: A User's Guide to the Art of Urban Exploration
C. Wright Mill's White Collar (hoping for some interesting perspective on the middle class... gifted from friend)

...and soon to be assorted course texts re: calculus, physics, existentialism (unfortunately short on the camus and long on the heidegger), and boethius.

Off to Sun Peaks near Kamloops, BC tomorrow so I expect I will plow thru a lot of reading in the car and at the hotel (after I throw myself unmercilessly at the mountain). It sure feels good to be back home in BC.
 
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natski

Cyburbian
Messages
2,579
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22
I made the "trendy" choice to read Memoirs of a Geisha like most people have.

Im only about halfway in and am very much enjoying it!
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs

I am now reading a rather interesting travellogue/memoir/contemporary history/history/philosophical musing (whatever) about iran, In the rose Garden of the Martyrs by Christopher de Bellaigue, a British-born journalist who writes for The Economist. He actually lives in Tehran with an Iranian wife. He interviews a variety of survivors of the Iran-Iraq bloodbath, the Revolution, etc. A lot of people willing to slaughter, or be slaughtered, in the name of God. A fascinating book.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,448
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25
BKM said:
Picked up again to actually read this time The Diamond Age, by Neil Stephenson. Interesting, but his conservative/libertarian politics are a little annoying.
I am interested to hear what you thought of this. This is the same guy who wrote Snow Crash?

I just finished Angels and Demons... hey it was sitting on my shelf and I needed something to read :p Felt like I was reading a recycled version of the Da Vinci Code... different story, same style... wouldn't read any more of his.

I read Cross Stitch recently and loved it... can't wait to read the next one!
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,895
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27
Just finished reading McCarthy's Bar: A Journey of Discovery in Ireland, by Pete McCarthy. It's a travelogue in the Bill Bryson vein, and I enjoyed it immensely.

The subtitle should really be "a journey of discovery in west Ireland." We're going to the west of Ireland in May - I can't wait! :)
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,262
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30
Dudewheresmyplan? said:
The book is quite interesting and all in a very short package (around 150-160 pages).

If you read it, let me know how you like it.

I've started reading Invisible Cities... I'll let you know what I think when I finish....
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
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22
Currently reading "Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School" by Gina A. Oliva.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,961
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31
Currently reading

Orson Scott Caird - Treasure Box, a weird love story and love does to a person when your internal desires and hopes are preyed upon by someone to get them what they want, without concern for you.

Adding to my collection of Judaica graphic novels - The Jew Gangster by Joe Kubert.
 
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BKM

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29
JNL said:
I am interested to hear what you thought of this. This is the same guy who wrote Snow Crash?

I just finished Angels and Demons... hey it was sitting on my shelf and I needed something to read :p Felt like I was reading a recycled version of the Da Vinci Code... different story, same style... wouldn't read any more of his.

I read Cross Stitch recently and loved it... can't wait to read the next one!

I'm still stalled on it. He definitely has a libertarian, even Randian world view. I have a very bad habit of starting multiple books, then wasting all my free time on the internet instead of reading. :-$
 

Globetrotter

Member
Messages
21
Points
2
I am currently reading Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs and Steel, and when I feel like listening to his often incessant ramblings, former President Clinton's autobiography, My Life:D
 
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