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What book(s) are you reading?

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
I know, its been done before but you're all such a bright and interesting bunch I'd just like to survey what you're voluntarily stimulating your Cerebral Cortex with. This is just one of those threads that seems ok to repeat every so often. I'm reading

Beyond Belief by Elaine Pagels

and

Benjamin Franklin: An American Life by Walter Isaacson.

Accompanied by The Oxford American Desk Dictionary and Thesaurus, 2nd edition
 

Wulf9

Member
Messages
923
Points
22
I'm reading the Alexander Valley Resort Administrative Draft EIR. Hope to get back to some real reading soon.

I didn't know Elaine Pagels had a new book. No doubt it's been out a while and I'm behind the loop. She is one of my favorite authors, as was her husband before his death. He was a quantum physicist and she is a Bible scholar. There must have been some interesting discussions around the kitchen table.

What's the gist of Beyond Belief?
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
High Hopes, The Rise and Decline of Buffalo New York at Dan's suggestion, and City of the Century about Chicago.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
My reading list

Currently reading -

The Mill on the Floss - George Eliot

Last three finished -

Middlemarch - George Eliot
Notes From Underground - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Stranger - Albert Camus

Next in line -

The Possessed - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Tin Drum - Gunter Grass
The Economy of Cities - Jane Jacobs
Exactions, Impact Fees and Dedications - Bob (Robert Freilich) and David Bushek.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
The Irish one said:
Accompanied by The Oxford American Desk Dictionary and Thesaurus, 2nd edition
Irish, have you every used dictionary.com? It's one of the most useful sites I've found.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Crazy Horse and Custer, The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors, by Stephen Ambrose.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
none at the moment...
Last one: Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson
Next in line: Pattern Recognition - William Gibson.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
On hiatus from reading:

Tom Robbins Villa Incognito, need to be in the right frame of mind to read it, I'm not right now.

Currently reading:

cerebus - rereading issues 280-290, to get ready for the final push to 300.
timequake - kurt vonnegut
 
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JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,816
Points
61
no ZG, you are not the only one.

I have read - Population: 485, Meeting Your Neighbors One Siren at a Time, by Michael Perry.

Waiting to read - Robert Ludlum's The Prometheus Deception.
and bunch of books my sister gave me.

Non-Planning magazines that I am reading is "Sea Classics" and The Sunday New York Times Magazine.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,932
Points
57
just finished "Lullaby" by Chuck Palinauk (sp?)

beginning "Everything Is Illuminated" by Jonathan Safran Foer

after that I will probably pickup Economy of Cities by Jane Jacobs
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
mendelman said:
after that I will probably pickup Economy of Cities by Jane Jacobs
I've got it waiting in the wings. Amazon had a special on Jane Jacobs paperbacks, which I took advantage of. "Cities and Wealth of Nations", "The Nature of Economics" and the "Economy of Cities" are patiently waiting on my bookshelf.
 

mcmplans

Cyburbian
Messages
31
Points
2
mendelman said:
beginning "Everything Is Illuminated" by Jonathan Safran Foer
I tried to read that book when it first came out, but could never get into it. I hope that it goes better for you.

I am currently reading "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
ZG: I like mysteries (and science fiction), too. My favorites tend to be rather dour (Andrew Vachs, James Lee Burke-who transcends the genre novelist label, imo, Ian Rankin (I want to visit Edinburgh) But, I've even read the Stephanie Plum series (its amazing-the principal planner, a "guy's guy if I've ever seen one, also likes Stephanie Plum novels)

I enjoyed Snowcrash,

The new William Gibson book is on my bookshelf right now.

First, I am rereading what I consider one of the most fascinating science fiction/fantasy series written: The Werwolves of London trilogy (The Angel of Pain is the second volume). It posits a world where "angels," beings with the creative force to change the perceptions of reality. have awoken after millenia of sleep. They are confused about the nature of modern reality and need to inhabit "cold-souled" human instruments to help them understand the nature of the current (Victorian England) era. Of course, these "angels" are at war with one another :) Its not a quick read, but some fo the ideas are simply fascinating.

I am addicted to architecture/photography books, so I am perusing The Most Beautiful Villages of Spain (a fantastically photographed series) and the teNeues series of interior architecture books on San Francisco and Sydney houses.

I also just finished Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House, but damn it, I still like modernist design, including "That Apartment" :)
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
BKM, if you like photography books try and find

First Son:portraitsbyCD Hoy

Awesome images of the early 1900's gold rush towns and its inhabitants.

I saw the plates at the Museum of Civilization and was fascinated by the quality of photography. You could see the reflection of the smoke from the flash in the people's eyes.

I have From Bauhaus to our house on my bookshelf here in the office, maybe time for a reread.

I have a hard time reading gibson, can never figure out what is going on.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,918
Points
37
Niall Ferguson: Empire - The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
el Guapo said:
I'm also reading "Teach yourself Bengali" Now, that's a scortcher!
uhhhhh...I think that's one that might be better in Books on Tape format.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,447
Points
27
The Rise of Nazism
Frank Munk
1943 ed.

Signed by the original owner:

j.w. Eiler
Co "D" 751st Tank Bn.
APO 464 - U.S. Army
12 May 1944
Anzio Beachhead

Purchased at my local library for $1
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
I'm ashamed to admit that I haven't read a book in months.....I think the last one I read was Serpent by Clive Cussler....
 

yaff

Cyburbian
Messages
108
Points
6
My two most recent books have been:
"Galelio's Daughter" by Dava Sobel and,
"Le Divorce" by Diane Johnson
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,313
Points
44
The Irish one said:
I went for four years without reading a book!
Was the period of time you spent at the DeVry Institute of Technology?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
BKM said:
ZG: But, I've even read the Stephanie Plum series (its amazing-the principal planner, a "guy's guy if I've ever seen one, also likes Stephanie Plum novels)
Cyburbians take note, you cannot read the Stephanie Plum books without absolutely howling with laughter.

BKM, you might also enjoy Joan Hess's Maggody series. They're also LOL.
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,779
Points
24
Pat the Bunny, Ladybug Ladybug

Can't find the time to really read. But if I were reading it would be nothing but fluff.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
The Irish one said:
No institutes involved. I'm lost on your response.
In the South, at least, this is one of those "pretend" tech "colleges" that teach you computer repair, etc., in return for which you subsidize the "college" with government funds. He's yanking your chain.
 

Jen

Cyburbian
Messages
1,704
Points
26
I am reading Rudyard Kipling stories, Kim, Puck of Pook's Hill and Jungle Book. Also reading Moving Violations by John Hockenberry.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
40
Someone gave me some used books to read, so lately I'm reading novels about the South. I started Cold Sassy Tree today; last week I read the sequel, Leaving Cold Sassy Tree.

I also finished Miss Julia Speaks her mind. These are the kinds of novels you can read in a day.
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,169
Points
24
I'm reading short stories by Andre Dubus.. I like the small committment of short stories. I read so much about planning for school.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
I read so much about planning for school.
Do you realize the dear leader reads all of our post? I'm sure you ment something else, because no one ever gets sick of Planning related material.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
kms said:
Someone gave me some used books to read, so lately I'm reading novels about the South. I started Cold Sassy Tree today; last week I read the sequel, Leaving Cold Sassy Tree.
Cold Sassy Tree is a great book, and a good study in suburbanization. The rural Georgia town described in the book is now a giant Tanger outlet shopping mecca on the outer fringes of Atlanta's sprawl.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,428
Points
40
biscuit said:
Cold Sassy Tree is a great book, and a good study in suburbanization. The rural Georgia town described in the book is now a giant Tanger outlet shopping mecca on the outer fringes of Atlanta's sprawl.
So now I'll read a map along with the book. :)
 

tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,905
Points
23
a John Irving book... that is getting a little dusty since I haven't picked it up lately...

I did just read "The Number 1 Ladies Detective Agency" which was a quick read while on vacation.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,447
Points
27
Trail Nazi said:
Pat the Bunny..
Me too! I read it several times a week. My son likes the part where he can feel dads "scratchy face" (for those who don't know, it's a childrens book with textures).
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
biscuit said:
Cold Sassy Tree is a great book, and a good study in suburbanization. The rural Georgia town described in the book is now a giant Tanger outlet shopping mecca on the outer fringes of Atlanta's sprawl.
where? what town?
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
Huston said:
where? what town?
The town of Cold Sassy Tree is actually a fictionaized Commerce, GA, about 1 hour up I-85 from downtown Atlanta. I believe that Olive Ann Burns, the author, was a native of Banks County.


How do I remember this crap from middle school?
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
I started and finished, "The Princess and the Potty". This tale of a young princess' transition from the "royal diaper" to pantiletes, is one of my daughters' favorites.
 

pandersen

Cyburbian
Messages
243
Points
9
"Mad Cows and Mother's Milk" - various authors

The book is all about risk assessment and risk communication.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
SkeL - how was Pattern Recognition? I recently read Virtual Light, and Neuromancer is one of my favourites (but I loaned my copy to someone and never got it back :( )

Have just finished 'A Rhinestone Button' by Gail Anderson-Dargatz, about a small community, somewhere in Canada, dealing with issues of religion. Quite liked it.

Now reading 'Billie's Kiss' by Elizabeth Knox (a NZ author), set on a Scottish island in 1903.
 
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