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What does the term "downzoning" mean to you?

What does "downzoning" mean?

  • Changing zoning to a more intensive, less restrictive zone (ex: R-1 to R-5)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    9

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,606
Points
69
As inspired by this thread. There's two definitions of "downzoning", each one the opposite of the other.

Current definition (after the mid-1970s) - rezoning "down" to a less intensive and more restrictive zone. (Example - rezoning from R-5 to R-1.)

Old definition (before the mid-1970s, more or less) - rezoning "down" to a more intensive, less restrictive, and thus less desirable zone, by the standards of a time where low density suburban development was the ideal. (Example - rezoning from R-1 to R-5.) This old definition supposedly persists in some pockets of the Northeastern US.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,796
Points
51
I go with less intensive use, but it has to be clear what less intensive is. Our code is cumulative for a bunch of single-family, a bunch of multi-family, 3 commercial zones, and 2 industrial zones. Any zone outside of that scale is not considered because it doesn't have a proper up or down intensity even if you could fit it in somewhere.
 
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