• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

What region do you live in & What's your geographic preference?

plankton

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
One of the gtc threads inspired the inquiry.

michealski says living by the ocean aint no big thang.

Let's hear what the rest of you think. I, for one, find the ocean amazing and never seem to tire of it. Are there other lakesiders out there that agree with m-ski that the ocean's just a buncha silly salt water? What about the mountain men & women in the group and the great plainers and the valley folks......let's hear what you think....
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I have lived by the ocean. It was nice to visit on the weekends, but not enough to make me want to live by it the rest of my life. I do find myself drawn to some landscapes more than others. The savanna region in which I live is a favorite. I like the rolling hills covered with prairies and clumps of trees. It doesn't really matter if that is California, Wyoming, Wisconsin or any other state (except Texas).
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Living in such a narrow country like Chile, I just can't imagine living far away from the sea. Right now I live just 10 miles from the sea and 60 from a big lake...
I just like the sound of the sea waves crashing onto the beach and rocks, and it's not just a flatland that gets to the sea, but rather a mountain chain that dives quickly to the sea.

I just hate the Patagonian prairies... just soooo boring... you lose the sense of scale quite quickly there... I just need lots of trees to live :)
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
Me like sea. You're never that far away from it in New Zealand and I love going to the beach. I think I'll always try to live near the sea. It's part of our culture.

This is near where I grew up - Kapiti Island in background

801Kapiti05.jpg

801Kapiti08.jpg
 
Last edited:

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,803
Points
61
I grew up on the jersey shore;
went to school in cache valley,ut;
worked/lived in the upper blue river valley, co;
now work/live in the ohio river valley.

prefer the jersey shore and cache valley.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
I have always lived in the southeastern US and loved it. I have lived next to or close to lakes, rivers, springs, oceans, mountians, caves, farms, large cities, small cities and finally medium cities (not all at once of course). I think my fav (if I could combo) would would be a medium city in a warm climate with a lake and and mountian view. Has anyone found this place? (is does not have to be in the US).
 
Last edited:

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
The interesting thing about my upcoming move and my curren tlocation is that teh landscapes are in some places identical and in other ways completely different.

Where I live now

2 blocks to the river/mouth of the bay to the ocean
Hilly / River valleys
Trees - let em grow for 60 years then clear cut

Where I'm going

Great beaches
Flat, cleared farmland, managed woodlots
Niagara Escarpment

I missed the farmland living here, I think I'll miss the trees where I am going.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,175
Points
51
plankton said:
michealski says living by the ocean aint no big thang.
I am an upper mid west man. I was born here, raised here, tried the East Coast thing, now I am back and better than ever. I like how there is everything from small mountains, and hills, flat planes, rolling hills, small lakes, big lakes, large cities, small towns, skiing, snowboarding, and the Red Wings.

As for the Ocean thing… I will agree that it is pretty to look at, but then again so is a forest in the winter, a busy but little downtown, and several other places with a tenth of the property cost. I would change my tone if there were docks or some other feature, and if it is a bay, that would help as well. There is something about seeing something on the other side. I grew up a few blocks from Little Bay de Noc on Lake Michigan, I loved it, because it was a bay, and you could see the other side. It was something more than just water. But when I got to Marquette, I would go running along the lakeshore on a regular basis, and it just seemed to be “nothingness” to me. I stand by my it ain't no big thing thought for the time being.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
I like New England / Northeast. I couldn't picture living more than a couple hours from the ocean. We've got big cities, little cities, historic towns galore, lots of shoreline, mountains. There's always some new unique town to see. New England could use some more global warming though. I'm at the southern end and its too damn cold.

From what little I've seen of the Great Lakes (just Ontario) its just not the same as the beaches, waves, rocks, and seaport towns of the ocean. I've only seen some of the Midwest from a plane and the infinite squares of farmland seemed very strange to me.

I also love the Pac NW landscape. I do really want to visit every part of the country though - they all have their ups and downs.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
I'm a southern New Englander by birth, and a northeastern U.S. resident by choice.

I love the diverse landscapes (especially our river valleys) and the relatively mature (ablieit small) mountain ranges of the norther Appalachian range.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,908
Points
57
I currently live in the Lincoln Park neighborhood on Chicago's near northside.

More specifically, I live on the block of North Clark Street where the infamous St. Valentine;s Day massacre happened.

I grew-up in Alpena, MI in the northeastern part of Michigan's lower peninsula on Thunder Bay (not the Canadian Thunder Bay). Alpena is on the shores of Lake Huron and I, much like michaelskis, lived a couple blocks from the lake.

I love the Great Lakes and the varied landscapes of the states and provinces that surround them. I also really love a real urban city, and I wasn't about to become a Canadian ;-), so Chicago was the place to come.

If you want relatively unspoiled, lightly populated nature, then the Upper Great Lakes are a great place to see.

Plus, when all the people in southwest start running out of fresh water, all us up here can laugh at them. ;-) :-D

http://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/commun...ics/Space_Images/Alpena-Thunder Bay(NASA).jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,779
Points
24
For me, I am a Florida girl. It does not matter what area of the state as long as it is Florida. I absolutely love being in the south, but now we are moving to a place we never ever dreamed of going to. . . the north!
 

PlannerByDay

Cyburbian
Messages
1,827
Points
24
I live in the Midwest and love the Midwest.

I need seasons and variety. If I were to move at this point in my live it would have to another area in the north. I like the variety of the seasons, I like looking forward to spring and summer after a long cold winter, and I look forward to winter after a hot and humid summer.

I enjoy many, many outdoor recreation activities from x-country skiing to mountain and road biking.

If I were to move out of the north I would have to give up some of my interests or at least have to resign myself to only being able to do them less frequently and I am nor ready to do that.

But ask me when I'm 50 years old. I may be sick of the winter and you might find me in the Southwest.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
New England.

Born here, will probably die here.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Just in case nobody has got the gist yet, I am NOT a prairie girl. It has been very difficult these last two years living so far from the mountains and the ocean. I don't know which I miss more... probably the mountains. I was spoiled growing up in California: lived in the mountains (Santa Monica Mountains that is) and 15 minutes away from the beach. A few hours to skiing and BIG mountains. After I moved out of the house, I lived in N. California (near BKM ), also an hour to the beach on one side and an hour to the Sierras. I moved from there to Whidbey Island (see below), and then Portland and then here to Edmonton.

I think Whidbey Island/Puget Sound and Portland were the best 'fits' for me. I'd move back to the North or West Puget Sound in a heartbeat (Port Townsend, Bellingham, Oak Harbor, San Juan Islands).

http://www.donferrario.com/travel/_images/whidbey.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,037
Points
23
Born in a big northern smelly industrial city, currently living in the midwest. I like the seasons, and the vistas combined with rolling hills and forests, but I miss the ocean (it was less than 50 miles away from where I was born). I've grown up in the midwest, though, and anything else seems strange. Portland, OR is beautiful, I love the northeast, especially Boston, but I'm a midwestern girl for now.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
I am a born-again West Coaster. What I like about California is not so much one aspect (the ocean, for example) but the incredible diversity of landscapes within a short drive or even a modest bicycle ride. For example, if I go riding in Napa County, I can start in a very nice traditional Victorian farmtown (Napa City), quickly get into a fine rolling oaks and savannah landscape, then descend into a beautiful fog-blessed vineyard country, then climb a mountain road along an oak and bay laurel lined creek, follow a ridgline through redwood forest, descend a 16% grade into another agricultural valley (Napa Valley), then climb through a rugged chaparell and wildflower filled canyon into rugged countryside reminiscent of southern California. (This all assumes I get my act in gear and drop the flab enough to ride this route). Plus, I love large rivers, and California has some within a short drive, including the American River and its 37 miles of bicycle paths and parks-and the Sacramento River, of course. Finally, I really like many urban areas of the inner Bay Area. Not only San Francisco, but also Berkeley, parts of Oakland (its not all tragic-there are some truly lovely areas), some of the Penninsula towns, and Marin County.

I liked the Knoxville (TN) area, but it just doesn't have this kind of variety. My hometown in Northern Indiana? I don't like corn and soybeans and urban sprawl THAT much. Like Nerudite, I'm not sure I am a prairie person, either. Give me hills.

Negatives: In an ideal world, though, I would probably live right near the Ocean. As much as I love my part of the world, I am, sadly, pretty allergic to it. Every Spring, I get sick from the pollen. Valley air quality leaves something to be desired.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,487
Points
41
If I had my druthers I'd live on the ocean, not just near it. I love the mountains and valleys of western Montana. I love the rocky coast of Maine.

I love fall mornings, with azure skies and brisk air that warms to shirt-sleeve weather and red-orange-golden foliage. I love winter grey skies and the silence of snow falling. Although I am allergic to the "Ohio Valley Crud", I am amazed at my wife's garden coming to life each spring. I can do without 98F and 100% humidity with tornado watches.

As it seems extremely unlikely that I will ever leave here to live elsewhere, I just hope that I will always be able to visit the places that are special to me.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
Born and raised in FL. Always lived here, except for college in New England. Less than an hour to great beaches. I don't think I'd want to live anywhere else.
 

Bangorian

Member
Messages
198
Points
7
Grew up in southern Michigan, amidst rolling hills, fields, woods, and lakes (both Great and not-so-great). It was nice, but there was way too much sprawl for me.

I spent as much of my existence in MI on the Lake Superior shore and basically anywhere around the UP I could get to. Still my favorite places in the world: Isle Royale, the Sturgeon River Gorge, the northern Keewenaw, and the Porcupine Mountains.

Now I live in Maine, right on the water, in the rocky (rugged?) mid-coast area in a delightful small town, not too far from the action in Portland, not too far from the mountains of inland Maine.

I love living by the ocean, but really its the variety of scenery that the rocky-ness and that living in coastal maine affords that I appreciate. For instance, during my ten-mile commute to work, I cross three rivers (all salty), pass by two lakes, cross over three saltmarshes, drive along a large cove, come within view of a handful of islands, and pass through various stretches of farm, forest, residential/commercial land and village.

Ocean views around here rarely come without an island, a craggy peninsula, a tidal saltmarsh, a lighthouse, lobsterboats, buoys, or gull-covered rocks. I've visited the Atlantic coast down south where it is a long flat stretch of sand, and I have to say I'm less impressed. Looking out and seeing nothing but the flat surface of the water doesn't do a whole lot for me either - I'm with those who say they like to see something out there across the water.
 

vaughan

Cyburbian
Messages
335
Points
11
Born and raised in virginia and truly enjoyed the rural nature, the farmer's markets, the mennonite-tended landscapes, and the old, old communities where I had the pleasure of growing up.

Have spent quite a few years now out West and, to put it bluntly, ain't never going back. The landscape, the amenities, the recreation, the great little towns- its gotten in my blood and I'm doing everything I can to put down roots. I had the pleasure of working as an archaeologist for a few years, and i was able to experience the western landscape in a very unique way.

I need never live in a big city, but give me a lively little community, some decently sized mountains, and some decently open landscapes, and i'm happy.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
Born in Jersey but I've grown up in San Diego, thanks mom and dad :h: Love the beach,coastal hills are the best! mountains and desert.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
I was born and raised in the countryside of the southern Appalachian foothills near a couple of clean and sizable lakes. It is beautiful there with four seasons (well, two of those were summer) and the sun setting over the mountains... I at times get homesick for that scenery but really coulnd't go back becuase it's just too far from everything. I then spent five years living near the beach and loved it. The life-style, the salt air...it was great there, just too flat for my taste.

Right now I'm living in a city plopped in between three major river valleys. The topography of this region can be very dramatic and definitely unique.

Like H, my dream city would be medium to large in size, within view of the mountains, on or very close to a nice lake, and no more than a half days drive from the ocean. Although, it doesn't necessarily have to be in the south.
 
Last edited:

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,898
Points
27
Seabishop said:
I like New England / Northeast.... We've got big cities, little cities, historic towns galore, lots of shoreline, mountains. There's always some new unique town to see.
Unique, historic towns = definitely. A place with character. And mountains, rolling hills, lakes, and streams need to be included too. I've lived most of my life in the northeast & mid-Atlantic states, with short stints in the southeast and southern California. Although I flirted briefly with the idea of living in the Seattle area, I can't imagine living outside the northeast. I like my four seasons, the colors of autumn, and even (though hard to imagine now) snow.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
I am a transplanted boy from the Bayou. Born in Houston but spent most of my life in Louisiana. But I always loved the West. Every time I went West for vacation I did not want to leave. So when a friend and I visited Montana in 1986 I decided when it was time to go that I would stay. Minus 19 months in Alaska, I've been here ever since. I love the mountains and the rivers. I love four seasons, though winter does wear on me around February. I love the long summer evenings. I love the big sky. I could live in Montana, or Idaho, or parts of Wyoming, Washington or Oregon. I am a northwesterner by choice.
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,369
Points
29
JNA: I have been trying to figure out how one could split the difference between the Jersey Shore and Cache Valley, which are both places I have spent some happy times. I fear it is either or, however. The Pacific Coast brings the mountains right up to the water, but it isn't the same. We are thinking about trying New England to see if that proximity of mountains and water would work for us.

New Englanders: It appears based on the applications I have tried so far, that New England is not an easy region to break into. Is it that provincial? Am I expensive? Salary history puts me in the '60s with six weeks leave, though I would take a cut (in pay, not in leave) to be someplace interesting. Any advice? Any New England biases I need to know about?

I find the influence of where folks grew up fascinating and have even contemplated a book about this. I grew up right on an ecotone (between the tallgrass of the Flint Hills and the mid-grass prairies of the real Great Plains) and have always loved local variety where I live. I went to the mountains because there is that variety, created by elevation changes, and abundant public land on which to roam.

Public land is what is missing in some Great Plains and Midwestern landscapes I am otherwise quite fond of (Traverse Bay, Sandhills, Flint Hills, etc), and I am curious how others feel about this factor and its influence on the quality of life and economic development. Do midwesterners feel at a disadvantage in trying to attract entrepreneurs to their places when competing with communities that have national parks, forests, etc?
 
Messages
1
Points
0
I would choose:

The architecture/history/cities of the NorthEast

The people of the Midwest

The affordability/pace of the South

The geography/climate/environmental awareness of the West Coast.


For the question of which one is better for me...The South might have more elements of each of those characteristics, so I should pick the South, however, the fact that I'd be closer to the likes of Atlanta/Charlotte/Orlando than New York City/Boston/Philadelphia/Chicago/Seattle/Portland, etc would really bother me.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
Lee Nellis said:
New Englanders: It appears based on the applications I have tried so far, that New England is not an easy region to break into. Is it that provincial? Am I expensive? Salary history puts me in the '60s with six weeks leave, though I would take a cut (in pay, not in leave) to be someplace interesting. Any advice? Any New England biases I need to know about?
For much of New England, you're likely overpriced.....outside of the more urban areas of Mass and CT, you don't typically see planners making that much, especially in Northern New England.
 

ilikefish0

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
After being in Tempe for a while, there is little that I want to do more than to get back to the southeast. Lack of humidity is killing me. I still haven't gotten over how they call a giant ditch running through the city a river. (I know it used to have water, but no water=no river) If the reast f the west is anything like the Phoenix area, I hope to leave it as soon as possible. This city just has too little character to interest me. (goofy giant grids with cul-de-sacs--yuck). Sea level rules!
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,369
Points
29
Give the rest of the West a chance. The only place that MAY be worse than the Phoenix metro area (which is essentially an outpost of southern California) is Las Vegas.
 

oulevin

Cyburbian
Messages
178
Points
7
Hmm

Living in downtown Cleveland does seem a world apart from suburban Oklahoma City, where I grew up. While I love the entertainment, walking to and fro, the relative architectural richness, and lakefront/valley of Cleveland, I miss the sky and wide open spaces of OKC. I may have gotten into city planning to escape suburbia on the great plains, but that place is also responsible for the memory of a fairly idyllic childhood.
 

plankton

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
the tale of two portlands......

I really enjoy the coast of the Pac NW but could see migrating to New England someday (I have family in ME & CT). Being from MI, the cold weather doesn't scare me......much (although my CA wife is another story..... :-c )

I imagine that planning work in New England involves more historic preservation & in-fill work as opposed to new subdivision planning that is so prevelent (even in Oregon with its rigid UGBs) here in the west. Maybe I'm wrong......??

Are UGBs very prevelant in New England? Or, do the enlightened folk of New England just know better than to push residential and commercial development out into timber and agricultural areas beyond the reach of urban services?

Any thoughts......
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
Points
31
Hey, Michaelskis.....I agree, the Red Wings are IT !!!!

Mendelman.....About seven years ago I came very close to buying a business just outside of Alpena. They were cookin' the books, though. Beautiful and off-the-beaten-track area.

MaineMan & Michaelskis.....This Bear loves the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.
_____

I have lived all of my life in NW Ohio. I like the change of the seasons. No hills around here, except in river valleys.

I will be retiring within ten years. My plans are to head to the Marquette, MI, area. The wife is considerably younger, so she'll have to support my fishing habit, heh heh heh.

My grandparents were from Russia and Lithuania. That's probably why I get a strange feeling in me when I stand along the shore of Lake Superior. I'm there, dude.

Bear
 
Messages
7
Points
0
Lee Nellis said:
Public land is what is missing in some Great Plains and Midwestern landscapes I am otherwise quite fond of (....., Sandhills, .....etc), and I am curious how others feel about this factor and its influence on the quality of life and economic development. Do midwesterners feel at a disadvantage in trying to attract entrepreneurs to their places when competing with communities that have national parks, forests, etc?
Saw the Sandhills reference... if interested, here is a post I placed elsewhere, if interested...

Moderator note:

(NHPlanner): Original, duplicate material deleted.

Posting identical posts in multiple threads not appropriate. Consider this a friendly warning. All duplicates of this are being deleted.

Board Rules said:
2.5 Duplicate posts and threads
A message may be posted in only one forum; duplicate posts and threads are not permitted.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Miles Ignatius

Cyburbian
Messages
368
Points
12
I'll Take The Mountains

I grew up in the Great Lakes region and then wandered aimlessly through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona for 22 years and landed in metro Denver 11 years ago.

You couldn't drag me from the place now; I like the proximity to the mountains and the culture and climate of the urban Front Range suits me just fine.

I travel quite a bit for work and no matter where I've been, I always feel fortunate to call this place home.
 

Man With a Plan

Cyburbian
Messages
223
Points
9
Grew up: Next to Boston on the ocean

Live: Next to DC

I know Boston is New England, but I still don't know if DC is the South, Northeast, or MId-Atlantic.

Geographic Preference: Areas that are close to the ocean and mountains, and contain walkable neighborhoods, bike and hiking trails, and enlightened people. Arlington, VA, and Cambridge, MA contain all of these attributes, however they are also two of the most expensive places to live. Although, planners make so much that cost is really a non-issue.
 

jread

Cyburbian
Messages
738
Points
20
I grew up in Southeast Texas but left as soon as possible. I now live in Central Texas and I really like it here. The landscape is beautiful and the lower humidity is nice. I can't stand the summers, though.

Austin is really the only place I would live in Texas. If I ever left here, I'd leave the state entirely. I can't stand the other areas in the Lone Star.

As for the region that suits me, it would have to be the Pacific Northwest. I've never been there but something about it calls to me. The landscape, the cold beaches, the foggy/drizzling days (I actually LOVE cloudy days and rain), the greenery... it is "me" for sure.

I haven't been to the Northeast, but I know I don't care for the Midwest and I absolutely HATE the Southeast (humidity, bugs, redneck asshats, religious fanatics, etc.)
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
Messages
1,550
Points
24
Man With a Plan said:
I know Boston is New England, but I still don't know if DC is the South, Northeast, or MId-Atlantic.
Whenever I've visited there, it seemed clear that NoVa is in the South, and suburban Maryland is Northeast/Mid-Atlantic.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,414
Points
34
Grew up in the savanna area along the Texas Gulf Coast. No winter to speak of. Seabreeze showers helped keep temps down, but humidity was usually high. Economy not all that great though, people are a little backwards, little concern for environment with heavy reliance on chemical manufacturing for economy. There are maybe two or three cities along there that I would live in.

Currently in the Texas Hill Country. I love being next to the lake and see the ocean as a silly salty thing that is no fun to waterski in. Beautiful area with rolling hills and valleys. Heavily wooded. It's either a drought or a flood here though--rain comes suddenly and in mass quantities. Development in the area is the definition of unsustainable with concern about water availability. Beautiful land is being chewed up by closed-minded development that won't get creative with their practice. People here tend to be very rich or very poor. I'm one of the few middle-class folks around here it seems like. Lots of resentment toward government control--lot's of Republic of Texas nutjobs, especially in western Comal County and Blanco County.

Where I would like to be: Great Lakes region. My preference would be to small towns in Ohio and the Toledo area in particular (BUN could probably guess where I would like to be). They are the nicest people I have ever met, even if some of them have some fun at the expense of my accent. They have four seasons, which would be a nice change from down here. The Great Lakes are freshwater, but you can still waterski, windsurf and stuff on them. I love seeing all of the working farms up there as well--I guess it reminds me of a simpler life. I strongly believe that this area will regain prominence again as transportation/travel costs increase. It's the only place I know where most of the products you need on a daily basis are manufactured within 200 miles of you. It has strong manufacturing and strong farming in reasonable proximity.

I love the architecture and history found in New England though.
 

Man With a Plan

Cyburbian
Messages
223
Points
9
pete-rock said:
Whenever I've visited there, it seemed clear that NoVa is in the South, and suburban Maryland is Northeast/Mid-Atlantic.
Thanks man! Living in NoVa for the past 1.5 months, I never knew what to call myself. Now I will do everything I can to aclimate to Southern culture.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
well.....

I love the (real) mountains (10,000'+) and I really like the ocean.......hmm......Maybe I should look into those places with both......hmm......
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,245
Points
32
Born, raised and residing on the high plains of the Front Range of Colorado. I like it here, but I have a Gypsy soul and sometimes long to wander.

The Pacific and Inland NW I really like. The lake country of North Idaho is really neat.
The Great Lakes region and Minnesota would be fun for me too.
I took an Ideal Place Survey online and it said Boston, MA for me. So maybe I'll have to try Beantown once in my life.
 

spokanite

Cyburbian
Messages
202
Points
9
zmanPLAN said:
The lake country of North Idaho is really neat.
Zman---shhhhhhhh! Keep quiet about that! ;)

For me, I've spent most of my life in the Inland Northwest. Leaving again would be a tough choice. I like the climate, the affordability and the proximity to so many things like national parks, Nelson BC, Seattle/Portland, etc. Although my next move will be to a large urban area in the Midwest or Northeast. I'm desperate to live again in a place where going carfree is not the minority.
 

jread

Cyburbian
Messages
738
Points
20
Suburb Repairman said:
Development in the area is the definition of unsustainable with concern about water availability. Beautiful land is being chewed up by closed-minded development that won't get creative with their practice.
So true :(

Even liberal and forward-thinking Austin, which has gone through many pains to preserve its lovliness, has rapidly fallen victim to sprawl in many areas. I'm hoping that the Envision Central Texas group will be able to influence development in the metro area, but we will have to wait and see. I was definitely glad that the poll they took of area residents showed a unanimous vote for denser development and preservation of natural areas. Our roads, environment and aquifer can only handle so much. Recent trends toward downtown development and neighborhood plans proposing denser zoning are definitely uplifting my spirits lately.
 

cololi

Cyburbian
Messages
1,185
Points
22
I need a place with big mountains and lots of snow. Speaking of which, it is supposed to snow on the highest peaks of the wasatch next week:) Second choice would be to have the ocean across the street.
 

Otis

Cyburbian
Messages
5,169
Points
29
I live two blocks from the ocean in the Pacific NW. Moved here from the DC area. I would have stayed there but for the weather (i.e., the hot humid summers). The ocean is great, but I could easily do without it. OTOH, it is nice to go to sleep listening to the waves. Right now my location of choice would be the front range in Colorado. HOWEVER, Mrs. Otis LOVES the ocean AND WILL NEVER LEAVE IT. So if I want to go to Colo., where Mrs. O has two brothers and associated families, by the way, it's going to have to be without Mrs. O. Decisions, decisions....
 

prana

Cyburbian
Messages
565
Points
17
Altitude, Altitude and more altitude! If I could go back to living in Leadville at 10,500 and make a living...I would! For now, half of that is better than nothing.

Oceans make good vacations. The Sonoran desert makes a good vacation.

Not much desire to venture too far east of here any more. And yes, I've lived in parts and visited most of the midwest, southeast and east coast.
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,241
Points
27
MaineMan said:
Grew up in southern Michigan, amidst rolling hills, fields, woods, and lakes (both Great and not-so-great). It was nice, but there was way too much sprawl for me.
Sprawl? Ya got something against Greater Detroit now reaching from S of Toledo to N of Bay City? (I know I do!)

I live smack dab in the epicenter of the sprawl. D-town, Mo-town, Motor City, Detroit Rock City, Murder City, the City Camille Jose Verega (sp) wanted to turn into the first US national park for ruins. The shocker is, many of his buildings are now full of lofts, or have been replaced by $2 billion worth of new stadiaii, home of the 2005 All Star Game and the 2006 Super Bowl.

I live and breathe Detroit and Michigan. From the days of using the freeway construction areas as my sandbox (visiting dad on the worksite) as a boy to today I've wanted to improve the quality of life for my area of the world. Yes I was exposed to transportation planning as a boy. Never thought I would end up doing it, or liking it so much... wanted to be an architect, but thats a different story.

Detroit has some very quiirky geography. It is a very flat place nestled between two gigantic lakes: Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair. Its suburban region is where the ice age deposits of rock formed mini kettles, moraines, and is full of hilly areas with smaller lakes and rivers. The City itself, while a shell of its former self still has one of the U.S. Largest Schools, Wayne State University at 35,000 students, with a Law School and Medical School that are second to none. Yes much of the city is bombed out looking, but not all of it is. There are still over 900,000 people living there, and it is home to some very large corporations. Yes the economic base is largly manufacturing, but the jobs are still there and who wants to say no to a $70,000 a year union jobs??

It gets cold here in the winter and hot here in the summer. But it is not as cold as where the Stan's live and while we are north of Buffalo we do not get that kind of snow.

The people here are surprisingly freindly, which is something that really amazes people who hear that this city is full of a bunch of rough, crime doing, hate mongers. To be sure those exist, but its not signficiantly more than you would find (in terms of percentage) than in any other town.

Another thing that amazes people about this area is the wealth. There are quite a few people living here that are stinking filthy rich, not just upper-middle-class, but they wipe their butts with $100 bills rich. This often leads to striking contrasts where you have a million dollar home sitting in an area of small worker cottages, or in some cases (as with the Grosse Pointe Border), you can literally see the line between the sneeches and the sneeches with stars on their breeches.
 
Top