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What region do you live in & What's your geographic preference?

plankton

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
So, it looks like the mountains are a favorite for many. The Smokies, White & Green Mountains, Appalaichans, Cascades, Sierra, Rockies, Porcupines (for da yupers)........
I really enjoy Oregon but often feel compelled to live somewhere else, such as the inter-mountain west or New England, just to experience living in as many places as possible in this great land...... :canada:, too.
 

safege

Cyburbian
Messages
716
Points
20
I've lived all my life in Minnesota, but I don't expect to retire here. Actually, retirement has me puzzled. I liked San Fransico when I was there on vacation, but it's way too expensive. For my low budget tastes, Reno has most of what I look for in a smaller space, but the water situation has me worried.

I could do fine in a big or medium sized city. Hot, cold, high, or low, scenic, or bland. Give me a half dozen cafes within walking distance and I'll call it home.

I think I know what will finally make me decide. Some bright and talented planner will push for a safege monorail, and I'll move there. :-D :-$ :D
 

hilldweller

Cyburbian
Messages
3,863
Points
23
Lee Nellis said:
New Englanders: It appears based on the applications I have tried so far, that New England is not an easy region to break into. Is it that provincial? Am I expensive? Salary history puts me in the '60s with six weeks leave, though I would take a cut (in pay, not in leave) to be someplace interesting. Any advice? Any New England biases I need to know about?

As a lifelong New Englander who recently left I think it can shed some light on this issue. First of all, local governments in New England are perpetually broke, thus they can't afford to pay planners much. At the same time there are a lot of highly educated/qualified (we're tallking Ivy League) people competing for jobs. And yes its as provincial as you've heard.
 

Peter Bratt

Cyburbian
Messages
113
Points
6
Here, there, and hopefully not everywhere

Dear All,

I have lived in a few places across the US. Interestingly, I was able to visit every place where I have lived in the past few on a vacation. Go figure....

Our trip started off where my wife and I currently reside, central New Jersey. Love allows for many things, especially disagreement about whether we like the east coast. My wife loves it, with all the cities, close proximity to everything, etc. Personally, I am counting the days until we get out of Jersey and move somewhere else. Too many people, too much clogging of the roads, and pure and simple man made ugliness.

We drove to Washington DC, where I lived for two years while working on the Hill. I love DC, even with it being on the east coast. For one, I lived in a wonderful neighborhood in Alexandria, and having a metro around was great. DC has a viable urban center, as well as many great suburbs around it, and I really miss living there.

The next stop of the trip was in Pittsburgh, PA, where I was born and raised for eight years. My family lived on the east end of Pittsburgh, in the now declining suburb of Wilkinsburg. Frick Park is amazing, and the geography around the town is great.

Next on the list was Columbus, Ohio. This is my favorite town of them all. I lived in Clintonville, which is a turn of the century suburb on Columbus that has a great assortment of shops, mixed-use dwellings, and the like. I went to graduate school at Ohio State, and wish that I had been able to enjoy my urban setting more than focusing on writing papers. I love Ohio for many reasons, but mostly the history and the diverse political landscape.

Finally we ended up in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I spent most of my childhood and college years here, and love my hometown. I'll probably never move back, but I lvoe visiting. I love the feeling on gets when driving up the street that you always took to get home.

So, to make a long story short, where would I like to end up? Upper Midwest, for sure. Michigan or Ohio would be my top two states in the region. I would also love to have the Pacific Northwest be an option, which it might be if I go to Portland State University for graduate school.

Peter
 

transformer

Member
Messages
77
Points
4
I currently live in Cincinnati, but spent my youth in upstate New York and spent a couple years in Colorado. Although Cincinnati is a wonderful city, you can't beat the mountains of Colorado.
 

Greenescapist

Cyburbian
Messages
1,167
Points
24
I grew up on the coast of Maine and have lived in DC, Wisconsin, and now Boston. I really like New England, but would consider living in Northern Californiam, the Seattle area or someplace in the Rocky Mountains someday. I'm more drawn to mountain and lakes landscape than ocean, but I do like having the ocean here in Boston and there are great mountains and lakes two hours away in NH and Maine.
 

back yard

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
Mountains and lakes/oceans combined

My ideal place is that I can overlook the lake from my mountain cottage which is surrounded by trees and flowers. The mountains and lakes should locate on a plateau, and sometimes the top of the mountain will be covered by snow.

I think Colorado and Utah might have the places like that, although I've never been there. But Fuji mountain, Switzerland, Austria and the mountains&lakes in my hometown will also be alternatives.
 

Future Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
124
Points
6
I grew up in western michigan and then found my way to San Diego. I love being around water and am only 5 miles from the ocean now. I especially love the hills and mountains and the varied landscapes found throughout this region.

Suprisingly, San Diego has hundreds of square miles of undevleoped terrain (National Forests, State Parks, etc) that are breathtaking. Nothing like hiking up a couple thousand feet and looking west 50+ miles to the ocean!
 

ofrc3

Member
Messages
14
Points
1
I was born in Manila, Philippines and I spent a couple of years living in Singapore. However, I spent about 15 years living and going to college in the San Francisco Bay Area (I'm 24) and I consider it my hometown.

I currently live in DC and living in a place that actually has all four seasons has definitely been an adjustment for me--my friends from New England laugh at me constantly for this observation.

This is the first time I've been more than 100 miles from a major body of water and living in a river town is a bit disconcerting.

I would like to end up living near the ocean again (although kayaking on the Potomac is definitely worthwhile). I'm also keen on living in an urban environment that has a great public transportation system (I don't want to own a car), independent bookstores and music stores, cheap ethnic restaurants, and generally a vibrant cultural scene. San Francisco definitely fulfilled my criteria and I would like to go back some day but DC definitely has these qualities as well (although I would like to have a Metro-accessible Asian supermarket and many of the Asian enclaves have decamped to the less than accessible suburbs and frankly, DC's Chinatown is a joke). New York obviously fulfills this criteria too.

Probably in the next ten years I'll end up in one of these three cities. Unfortunately they're incredibly expensive places and I'll more than likely end up in less affluent neighborhoods thereby gentrifying yet another portion of the city with my demands for cheap ethnic restuarants, independent bookstores, music stores and cafes, a vibrant cultural scene........ . :r:
 

CDT

Cyburbian
Messages
198
Points
7
I am a midwesterner in a million+ population city. I have lived in St. Louis, Detroit-metro, Seattle-metro. I like the where I am now but if I had to move, I would go to Colorado. Probably Boulder(to indulge my hippi nature) or Denver-metro.

The winters are more mild now thanks to globalization.
 

Breed

Cyburbian
Messages
589
Points
17
I live in northern SC. At the base of the Appalachians, but within a couple hours of the beach.

My preferred geographic area would be a place that is diverse. Two things I don't like about our current location: nasty summers and lack of real winters (mostly ice, little snow). If I had a choice, I'd pick a place that has good access to the coast and the mountains, with definitive seasons. Originally, I would say we'd have to have access to an ocean, but after spending a couple trips at Lake Chatuge in Georgia, there are reasons why being near a lake instead would be good.

Maybe if there was a place that met all of the following requirements:
- significant population (enough to be commercially significant, but not so much as to be excessively crowded)
- access to the ocean
- access to a good-size lake
- four legitimate seasons
- access to mountainous terrain

My mind keeps coming back to New England, although some places in Germany would probably fit the bill, maybe northern Italy.
 
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I've always felt an attatchment to the fertile Mississippi river valley, especially St. Louis (where i grew up) and New Orleans, which I was planning to live for a while as well as the karst topography of the ozarks. I especially enjoy the lush flora and atmosphere of urban neighborhoods in cities of this valley. The people and the unprecidented turnaround in many urban environments in the central united states (hopefully someday in the delta region...) make all the difference in me deciding to remain here, along with the quality of life in urban areas that is becoming (somewhat) comprable to east coast cities, especially since you can afford to buy a historic home and still walk to and eat at a nice restaurant every night without worrying about paying the bills every waking moment and just enjoy life...


I think I would like the upper midwest quite a bit but havent spent much time there other than chicago and minneapolis, which i enjoy. im going to wisconsin in a week to camp and explore madison and milwaukee. the somewhat mild winters (to me, anyway) of the lower midwest i would miss, however. I can probably count on one hand, (maybe two...) how many days were uncomfortable to bike to work and school last winter here in kcmo...the summer is a different story, however...
 
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jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
Breed said:
My mind keeps coming back to New England, although some places in Germany would probably fit the bill, maybe northern Italy.

Yup, sounds like southern New Hampshire to me: Lake Winnipesaukee, the White Mountains and the Boston metro all within a 1 hour drive.
 

cch

Cyburbian
Messages
1,436
Points
20
I'm an upper-midwest gal... born and raised in Iowa, now living in Illinois, working in Wisconsin. I've traveled all over the western United States and the south, but never much in the east. I've gotta say, I would love to live in the Pacific Northwest. I've been to Portland and I felt like I belonged there (a woman even stopped me to ask for directions, so I must have looked like I lived there). To have the mountains and the ocean, not too far away, and the forests. I like the climate there, and the laid-back lifestyle.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,304
Points
35
After yet another hot, dry Colorado Plains summer, I am very ready for cooler, wetter climates and I think my fiance is too.
We've a planner leaving next week for Minnesota. Imagine! A true winter! :)
Now only if that housing market would pick up! :-@
 

Big Red

Cyburbian
Messages
114
Points
6
Northern Michigan

deliverance_teeth.jpg



People think I'm cracked when I say it's a lot like Northern California without the big mountains like the beautiful Trinities :l:

When I say Northern Cali I ain't talkin' about San Francisco, I mean Eureka , Redding, the state of Ecotopia. (Anybody remeber that one?)

Full of weed growing rednecks who want to be left alone. :p
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,461
Points
29
Northern Michigan

deliverance_teeth.jpg



People think I'm cracked when I say it's a lot like Northern California without the big mountains like the beautiful Trinities :l:

When I say Northern Cali I ain't talkin' about San Francisco, I mean Eureka , Redding, the state of Ecotopia. (Anybody remeber that one?)

Full of weed growing rednecks who want to be left alone. :p

Have you ever perused the Arcata Eye Police Log? :p
 

back2zero

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
I grew up here in the Northwest on the Lake. I went to college on Puget Sound.
My wife grew up at the gateway to Yellowstone, with a very little spell in the midwest.
I have been close to hills|mountains and water most of my life - both in urban and more desolate settings - all at once.
When we retire, our hope is to take trips to the Tetons and live Oceanside on the Central to Southern Coast of Oregon.
There is something in us (myself, my wife and whoever shares this sentiment) that never wants to be far from water or mountains. At six hours from the ocean and four from the Sound, we are too far right now. But - we're only 35 minutes from a cabin we can occaisionally borrow on Lake Coeur d'Alene and that makes alright.
 

K9 Police

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
Currently in a region with absolutely no mountains, but I would have to say my geographic preference would have to somewhere very close to them. Colorado/Utah/Arizona area is breathtaking.
 
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