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What to do with magazines?

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,194
Points
26
I am trying to go through my old magazines here at work, and feel tremendously guilty getting rid of them. The State ones are usually pretty helpful and informative, so I will keep them around for reference.

But, what about Planning and the Journal, for example? I don't look at them again after I first read them. The local library doesn't want them. What do you guys do with yours?

Thanks :)
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Do what the APA does - charge someone $125 a year and just mail one out per month.

Maybe a student here would be willing to pay shipping for them?
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
They don't take up a ton of room, so I have kept every once since I joined back in 98.

I would ask your local planning school if they want them.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,566
Points
59
Thanks to recycling that problem is taken care of.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,517
Points
69
I held on to mine forever -- I had 'em all going back to 1988 -- but a couple of years ago, I realized that I never, ever referred to them for anything. Instead of moving a heavy box filled with back issues of Planning, I recycled most of them.

Now, when I get them, they go to the bathroom with the other periodicals, and it gets tossed after a month.

Planning has gotten better the past few years, but they're still not save-worthy. Large city libraries already get Planning. Libraries aren't interested in partial magazine collections, and increasingly they get periodicals on mocrofiche rather than in paper form.
Colleges and universities with planning programs might be interested in back issues of JAPA, but odds are they already have a subscription.

Just trash 'em.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
When I read them I cut out any articles that I think I might want to reference in the future. These go into a pile with articles from other sources, which eventually get put into a set of ring binders during a slow period in the office. On rarer occassions I thumb through the binders and toss the articles that are no longer of any interest.

This works out pretty good. We will have a discussion of something - say 'design guidelines" - and I can pull a binder off the wall with a couple dozen good references, as well as ordinances and manuals from a dozen communities. Of course, you need the space to store this sort of thing. My personal planning-related library would stretch out sixty feet if each book or binder were placed next to each other.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
When I did get them I had a hard time justifying keeping them since I never read them when they were new.

Aren't they online yet?
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,524
Points
23
I joined as a student in 1980 so I had heaps. Earlier this year we did some reorganisation at home (my empire contracted and the kid's empire expanded) so they had to go. I offered them to the library who looked through them, said no, and trashed them.

Now I use a magazine holder on the bookshelf (sits next to the Harry Potter and Captain Underpants series). When it's full I'll pull out the oldest and put in the newest.
 
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