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Working ✍️ When is it time for a new job?

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
508
Points
15
At the total cheesy risk of sounding like "how do you really know you want to marry someone", how do you know when it's time to leave your job? Every job I've had in planning didn't last more than 2 years for various reasons. I'm at the 2 year mark now and it's quite frustrating that barely any of my projects have actually panned out and I keep getting more and more frustrated with my work. On the other hand, I love the people (literally the only thing that's keeping me going working remote during the pandemic) and the good pay/benefits. But I have issues with the disorganization, my specific role, all my projects that got suspended indefinitely, and all the bureaucracy/never ending red tape/reviews up the chain (I'm at a large public agency). I've tried private consulting as well, and while I loved the projects and people, it was also hella stressful and pay/benefits wasn't keeping up with the amount of stress and workload.

So, how did you know when it's time to move on? Would especially appreciate input from younger and/or mid-career planners since that's my situation.

Many thanks!
 
Last edited:

Clange000

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
I worked for a rural county for 6 years and then our family made a move for me to take a city planning job in a city of approximately 100,000. I have been here for 2 and a half years and am a bit bored and tired of the politics. I have now been in current planning almost 9 years and I’m looking for new opportunities.

I was talking to an older more senior planner who said that maybe you’ve gained everything you need from this job and it’s time to move on. It resonated with me that if you don’t love the job that it’s ok to look for something else to continue building your skill set.

So I would look at it as are you learning anything new that you can utilize in the future and is there any potential for growth? If not, then I think it would benefit you to start pursuing something else.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
508
Points
15
Thank you @Clange000 , that's a great way to look at it. Unfortunately I feel like I have accomplished nothing and don't see anything coming up this year that I can utilize in the future or learn from. So I think I have my answer...
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,750
Points
35
At the total cheesy risk of sounding like "how do you really know you want to marry someone", how do you know when it's time to leave your job? Every job I've had in planning didn't last more than 2 years for various reasons. I'm at the 2 year mark now and it's quite frustrating that barely any of my projects have actually panned out and I keep getting more and more frustrated with my work. On the other hand, I love the people (literally the only thing that's keeping me going working remote during the pandemic) and the good pay/benefits. But I have issues with the disorganization, my specific role, all my projects that got suspended indefinitely, and all the bureaucracy/never ending red tape/reviews up the chain (I'm at a large public agency). I've tried private consulting as well, and while I loved the projects and people, it was also hella stressful and pay/benefits wasn't keeping up with the amount of stress and workload.

So, how did you know when it's time to move on? Would especially appreciate input from younger and/or mid-career planners since that's my situation.

Many thanks!
I ask myself why have those jobs only lasted 2 years or so? Maybe it might be time to ask yourself if planning is even your jam.
 
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