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When is the next step?

What do you think would be a good idea?

  • Get out now.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Start looking from time to time

    Votes: 4 36.4%
  • Stay where I am till the new mayor takes office

    Votes: 4 36.4%
  • Stay where I am for 2 to 3 years

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • Stay here till I get my AICP and then move

    Votes: 1 9.1%

  • Total voters
    11

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,473
Points
44
I am a bit confused, and more so concerned with choices. With that I pose this question. How long should I stay here, and if I leave now, will it look bad on my résumé? What would all of you do if you where in my situation?

I have been at my job now for 9 months. It is my first job out of getting my BS in Land Use Planning, and thus far, I have done allot, but I do not feel that I am able to accomplish much of anything here. I have realized that there are several forces working against me, (such as other planners in the office, a corrupt administration and C.D. director, and an over all lack of willingness to work with the city on the part of the community, county, and other development agencies. Yesterday was the primaries, and one of the candidates is a former engineer, and he would be good as mayor, but there is a chance that he would bring in a CD director who is so old school, he would not allow GIS to continue. What do you think I should do?
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Personally, I always get the job jitters when questionable administration changes are pending. I would stay put through the elections and see what happens. A few reasons:

1. You haven't been there a year and you have no 'solid' reasons to move on. If I interviewed a candidate and they said they left for the speculative reasons you stated and the corruption charges (which I have no knowledge of through personal or media sources), I would be skeptical in hiring you.

2. You mentioned that you don't feel you've been able to accomplish much. Well, IMHO, entry level planners won't get that feeling most of the time, especially in the size of community you're in. If you do get it, it takes YEARS. I was in my first job 2 1/2 years, and it wasn't until 4 years after I left that I saw the projects I 'planted seeds' for finally take off and become reality.

I suggest you update your resume but think twice before moving on prematurely.

Good Luck.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Seems like you are very worried about things there. I would keep your eye out for other opportunities, but make sure the next job is something you really want and not just change for the sake of change. Maybe wait it out and see what the new administration brings. Do you really think someone would cut GIS? I would assume that the City has spent a great deal of money on GIS and the powers that be would not want to just drop it even if some director wanted it cut. However I guess I would question the hiring of any CD Director that was willing to revert back to paper maps.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,890
Points
38
I'm with Chet. Be patient, and don't jump too soon.
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
Stay put. It's going to take a while to get that one project that makes you feel like your degree and all your time and effort is worthwhile. Besides, who's to say that the next job won't be the same or even worse?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
I would start looking, but only for jobs that are either a step up or more interesting. Then if you get the interview and are asked why you are leaving there is no need to mention the internal politics and fears of the current job.
 

Wannaplan?

Galactic Superstar
Messages
3,150
Points
28
You will regret it if you bolt too soon.

Been there, done that.

Give it a chance, you will feel better about it in the long run.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I'd stay put until the administration changes are through. Two things can happen: things will get better or things will get worse (duh, right?)... but at least you know where you stand in your organization right now. If you move somewhere else you are guessing that the new job isn't in the same situation as your current one... and you just can't be sure about that. So if things might get better, just stick around and see what happens. If things get worse, then at least you are already in the mindset that you didn't want to be there for the long term anyway, and then you'll feel good about moving on to a new position.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,473
Points
44
I am not too worried about loosing my job. As for the GIS, we have a basic system. Our base map came from the country for free, the only thing that they payed for was Arc View 8.2, a digi cam, and a new 42 inch printer. (OK I guess they have spend a few $$ on GIS)

Thank you for your suggestions. I think that I will stay. Maybe with a new Mayor, I can plant a few ideas right away and see what happens.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Stick it out for the time being. Chet is right in saying that it is too soon to move on without a good reason, and it takes time to see things through. I am still working on a project I began six years ago, and probably won't get started for another six. That's all too common.

In the meantime, while waiting to see how things will shake out, network! Get to know others in the profession, especially potential mentors. Volunteer to help with professional events. Get yourself known. Jobs may come looking for you.
 
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