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Where Do America's Urban Planners Live?

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,233
Points
25
"Where Do America's Urban Planners Live?" Article

No big surprises here. . . there are more new planning jobs in growing metro areas.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,788
Points
58
From the article:

On the flip side, some of the metros with the lowest location quotients (of less than .60) for urban planners include: St. Louis, Nashville, Chicago, Houston, Las Vegas, New York (perhaps surprisingly), Atlanta, and Cleveland.
Chicago: That surprises me. I'd guess it's partly the result of the fragmented suburban government pattern. Chicago has lots of little suburbs that probably rely on building or code enforcement workers for current planning/devrev.

St. Louis: Considering how the city is surrounded by a thick layer of small to tiny suburban municipalities, many with populations in the hundreds, I'd expect there to be few planners in the public sector. Also, communities with a fragmented land ownership pattern tend to have fewer large-scale subdivisions or "planned communities". Visiting the area, I can really see the lack of stewardship in the built environment, compared to Missouri side KC.

Houston: Well, there's that no-zoning-let-the-market-do-its-thing thing. Houston also has relatively few incorporated suburbs for a city its size.

New York (city, I assume): I seldom see job listings for local government jobs in the NYC area. On the APA NYC Metro site, there's surprisingly few job listings than what you'd excpect for a metro area with a population of 20,000,000. What's out there is mostly in the private sector.

Cleveland: I could have told you that years ago. I was one of four planners (three, if you consider the PD was hired as a draftsperson in the 1960s, and didn't have a college education) in the planning department of a suburban county of 230,000 residents. That agency is now down to one planner, and two CD/housing staff. The vast majority of Cleveland's suburbs, including some with populations over 50,000, had zero in-house planners. Many had ED and CD/housing/grant writing agencies, though. In the mid/late 2000s, most of the planner-less communities contracted with one of two private planning firms for current planning services. One of them, D.B. Hartt, had only a few employees, and the other was McKenna Associates. Both employed mostly graduates from colleges/universities in Michigan.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,830
Points
40
Houston has so few other cities because of Texas annexation laws. As soon as a community looks about ready to become a city Houston annexes the thing.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
4,890
Points
29
Planners in Knoxville on average make more than those in Los Angeles? Riiiiiiiiight....
 
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