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Who to contact if you suspect fraudulent broker practices?

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
So we didn't close. This entire time every good faith estimate has shown us with no closing costs at the end and I get a call as we're pulling up to the title place we owe over 1800 and the title woman says, "but I'm sure you know this, as your broker said he talked to you about this earlier."

Um, no he actually didn't. He hasn't called me except for once, and that was after I left him 3 messages. He didn't call either my realtor or me to let me know there were 3 papers he forgot to have me sign. He didn't call to let either of us know the terms of my loan had changed (on a #$*($%# whim basically). Then the lies started. He told us he didn't know we were closing in June- how the $&%* do you not know that- and if you thought we were closing in May why weren't the papers done last week? (That's another thing, the papers were supposed to be done last week but now I'm thinking he stalled because he didn't want anyone to call him out).

So, that's just half of it, but every time I, or my realtor, would ask him a question he'd hem and haw and then have to lie. He had no answers for anything he'd done but expected us to just pull 1800 out of our @$$. (I mean, fine give me a few hours and I could've done it, but 5 GD minutes and not even call me but have title do it for you even though we agreed he was to call me a 3 p.m.)

So, who all can I contact to have the proverbial **** storm rain down on him? I looked up bank regulations stuff and they're also GAAP, but I know from some of what I've read he's broken some of the laws. BBB too?
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
I'd start with your state Attorney General's office. And definately file a complaint with the Better Business Bureau, the state licensing agency, and any local, regional or state professional associations this fool belongs to.

That really, really sucks. :-c
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
Whoops, I left out this bit of info:

I am closing on my house today. I finally got the paperwork corrected
(took him all of on hour to do his job right for the first time) and I sign this morning and pick up the keys tonight. I think the thing that really upsets me is he lied about it and continues to lie. If the paperwork was so easy to pull together correctly why not just have it correct to begin with?
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
29
eeeek good luck.

Sometime after you have closed I will share the story of my closing and the screw off other real estate person.

Have fun with the new house :)
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Habanero - In most states realtors must be licensed by the State. They usually have a separate ethics board to investigate problems before they referred for legal action. *Most* brokers want their profession to be clean, so their self policing tends to be fairly good.
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
Messages
1,361
Points
23
Habanero said:
Whoops, I left out this bit of info:

I am closing on my house today. I finally got the paperwork corrected
(took him all of on hour to do his job right for the first time) and I sign this morning and pick up the keys tonight. I think the thing that really upsets me is he lied about it and continues to lie. If the paperwork was so easy to pull together correctly why not just have it correct to begin with?
I agree with SGB. Even though you're back on track with the closing (congrats! :)), that jackass needs to be reported.
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Habanero - In most states realtors must be licensed by the State. They usually have a separate ethics board to investigate problems before they referred for legal action. *Most* brokers want their profession to be clean, so their self policing tends to be fairly good.
Chet is exactly right. Investigate what professional organizations or licensing requirements exist for Realtors in your state both on the local and state levels. Even here in poor ole Mississippi, generally one call to the State Board of Realtors will get most problems dealt with.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
I take it this is a mortgage broker. If he is with the bank you deal with I'd talk to the bank manager and say this fool just cost your establishment all of our business. Bye and see what happens, maybe you'll even get a partial refund. I'd also start shopping for a new bank, many banks (here) will pay any penalties to have you switch over, especially if you are bringing all of your business with you. I know this threat worked wonders when I was going through this with my house,and the staff person did not want to approve me. I have also found it helps to let the person know you participate in real estate transactions all of the time and that this seems out of the norm.

On complaints, the BBB is never a bad place to start.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
Chet said:
Habanero - In most states realtors must be licensed by the State. They usually have a separate ethics board to investigate problems before they referred for legal action. *Most* brokers want their profession to be clean, so their self policing tends to be fairly good.
I went along with a friend as a character witness to a state real estate licensing hearing. She was trying to get a realtor's license and had gotten a DUI 15 years previously. It amazed me, the people who were able to get licenses or have them re-instated. One woman had been convicted of swiping $$ from escrow accounts while she was a broker, and they gave her back her license. Another had convictions for writing bad checks. In FL at least, it seems that anybody with the cash to take the licensing exam can get a license.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Habanero said:
But it's not the realtor, it's the broker, would it still be the same thing?
Broker is one step up from realtor. Every realtor has to be backed by a broker, at least in most states... So the one who opens the office has to be a broker.

And he should know better... It HAS to be disclosed on the good faith estimate, or of course, it wasn't given in good faith. Did you pay the $1,800? If so, use your paperwork and file against the guy in small claims court. No broker in his right mind would risk a judgement, especially under these circumstances, for that amount of money.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Habanero said:
But it's not the realtor, it's the broker, would it still be the same thing?
They are both licensed through the Department of Real Estate.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
ludes98 said:
They are both licensed through the Department of Real Estate.
ah ha, well then, I'm going to contact them as well.

I refused to pay the 1800 and walked from the closing table. I don't think he was expecting that at all. He was on speaker phone in the room with the title woman, my realtor, and I spoke up when he said "she has to pay that to close" and I said, "if you want to play games-bring it. My lease is not up until the end of July and I can easily find another home. These terms are not agreed to, were never agreed to, and never disclosed, and unless this is fixed by tomorrow morning I walk."

I becames a homeowner about an hour ago. :) My terms, but I still have the "good faith" estimates and we're still filing against him even though that's not what we closed with. It's the principal behind it.
 
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nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Habanero said:
I becames a homeowner about an hour ago. :) My terms, but I still have the "good faith" estimates and we're still filing against him even though that's not what we closed with. It's the principal behind it.
You rock! I'm so glad that other people stand up for themselves... I thought I was the only one that actually filed complaints when crap like this happen. Last fall, Elmo and I moved out of our apartment when we bought the house. We didn't get back ANY of our $750 deposit, as they said they had to clean for 19 hours. Considering that I hired someone to clean the place, it couldn't have been more than an hour or two. I complained to provincial Consumer Affairs and when they got notice that the apartment was under investigation, they cut me a check for $650. So many people probably get shafted from this place, it just makes me sick.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Habanero said:
I refused to pay the 1800 and walked from the closing table. I don't think he was expecting that at all. He was on speaker phone in the room with the title woman, my realtor, and I spoke up when he said "she has to pay that to close" and I said, "if you want to play games-bring it.
RED FLAG #1: If he was not in YOUR closing room, he was an agent of the seller, not the buyer. Review your records before you do anything. Any agent representing YOU would have been in YOUR room at the closing.

You may not have anything here if that is the case. But I am glad you got your way. Way to strap on the cajones, baby!! And congrats to J**** too.
 

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Chet said:
RED FLAG #1: If he was not in YOUR closing room, he was an agent of the seller, not the buyer. Review your records before you do anything. Any agent representing YOU would have been in YOUR room at the closing.
He could have been a dual agent, but that must be disclosed in the contract. In most forms, it's near the end. Check and see if he even was your agent...

If not, how about a swift kick in the groin for him? That should make you feel better. Do it in his office and yell something first... like, "Don't you ever touch my <insert body part> again, you letcherous jackass!" Then storm out before he can recover. :-c
 
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