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whore for the MAN

BiteMeElmo

Cyburbian
Messages
324
Points
11
Ok, so I'm having this performance review meeting the other day. It is vaguely hinted at that my future with the company would look a little stronger if I tone down my hair (it's getting kind of long and is a little "bushy"). So, despite laws that protect my choice in hairstyles (and since I REALLY need this job), I'm cutting my hair to make a better impression and fit the "businesslike" look a little better.

What have you done that you didn't really *HAVE* to, or maybe didn't want to, in order to get or keep a job?
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
cut my hair
learn tact
learn what other people find offensive
learn to be flexible
whatch what I say about whom
learn I don't have to always be right
learn to let some subjects drop
say "I am sorry" and mean it

You know, the stuff you should do if you are not independently rich to live WITH other people in the real world :)
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Shave every morning - the Don Johnson look is apparantly unprofessional.

And I have the common sense to drink Mad Dog in the men's room where no one can see me. ;)
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
Seabishop said:
Shave every morning - the Don Johnson look is apparantly unprofessional.
Crap - this is unprofessional now? When did this happen? Nuts. I have to get out of bed 5 minutes earlier now.

And I have the common sense to drink Mad Dog in the men's room where no one can see me. ;)
Crap, this is required to appear professional now too?


Seriously, though - wearing a tie is about as far as I'm willing to go at this point. I have lack of ambition at a very advanced and maybe terminal stage now, and acute cynicism is apparently one of the primary indications.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
El Feo said:
Seriously, though - wearing a tie is about as far as I'm willing to go at this point. I have lack of ambition at a very advanced and maybe terminal stage now, and acute cynicism is apparently one of the primary indications.
.

I used to wear the tie until I realized that my boss would wear t-shirts to meetings.

I am familiar with cynicism. :)
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I've never gotten the nose ring I've always wanted. That's life in government though... maybe I'll take a 'personal day' to get over it. ;)
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,704
Points
69
BiteMeElmo said:
It is vaguely hinted at that my future with the company would look a little stronger if I tone down my hair (it's getting kind of long and is a little "bushy").
coughMULLETcough :D

Seriously, one time I got a harsh, closed door verbal reprimand for wearing a wrinkled dress shirt to a Planning Commission meeting. The meeting was aired on cable TV, and the PD thought it was a poor reflection of the city. Granted, it was the same shirt I wore to work that day, unwrinkled out of the closet, but still, it was rather petty and trite. No, I didn't get any credit for my otherwise damn good presentation, compared to the stammering filler word-packed presentation of my colleauges.

I also got reprimanded for scratching my back once at that meeting, I kid you not. Again, "unprofessional." It's not like I took my wrinkled shirt off and started going at my shoulder bone with a fork or something. Sheesh.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
This is a very current topic. When my employer pisses me off, I usually do a dramatic visial change in my appearance. I am one of the two people/reasons they had to institute a "no visible body art policy"

So last time they pissed me off, I shaved my head. Not buzz cut. Bald. You cant have a no bald policy after all, right?

After the whole Pridence thing last week, the former mayor caught up with me and said "Get a tattoo this week?" No. He followed with "Well, you still have your hair, so what do you d.... oh no, you didnt pierce something I cant see, did you?" not YET.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
Stop complaining that all the out-of-state conferences and large raises go to the Planning Director's brown-nosing minions.

Work long after 5 p.m. or we won't believe you take your job seriously.

(From my last planning manager): You need to confront me and let me know when you're mad at me. Alice lets me know when she's mad at me. Why won't you? If you don't trust me enough to let me know when you're mad, I can't trust you.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
Well, as a career homemaker, I have made jokes that "it is like being a hooker with one customer". The pay sucks, but, hey, I have all that 'free time' to pursue my hobby of being a Domestic Slave and waiting on the family hand and foot and cleaning all the time.

(There is an upside: all that nearly dying gave me a "f*** you" attitude and now the rest of the family does most of the cooking and cleaning while I take college classes and Get A Life.)

It's tough all over folks. Even the independently wealthy need people skills. I know a woman recieved many thousands of dollars in stocks gifted to her at Christmas every year over a period of several years from a very wealthy elderly couple. She did their housekeeping, knew the code to their safe, and took care of the wife who was dying. The adult kids of this couple didn't have the code to the safe and maybe didn't even know where it was.

Money does not exempt you from being human and needing people.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Re: Re: whore for the MAN

Dan said:
coughMULLETcough :D
Like that would happen when he's with me? Not in my lifetime! Although.... we did have this bright idea that he should cut it down to a mullet as a joke for Halloween. I think his haircut tomorrow will end up ruining that big plan though :(
 

BiteMeElmo

Cyburbian
Messages
324
Points
11
Too bad I'm already locked in for a hair appointment...the mullet thing on halloween would have been cool, but maybe too obvious in light of that new TV show, "The Mullets"
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
One job required me to wear a suit every day, but that was just a symptom of a very rigid corporate culture that hated individuality or original thought, and I could not endure for more than eight months. In that job, I can relate to Dan's comments about pettiness. I was conselled once for renting from a different car rental company than usual, depite saving over $20 a day and for the company.

In my current job, I was asked to wear a tie - I do, for the most part.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
It is not so much what I HAVE/HAD TO do its more of what I CANT/COULDNT do.

One example: I really want blue hair but never have and probably never will because what my limitations will become due to people’s perceptions of “professional” and “kept”.

*sigh *
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
Chet said:
So last time they pissed me off, I shaved my head. Not buzz cut. Bald. You cant have a no bald policy after all, right?
Interesting....so the reaction was???

Good thing there's not a policy against baldness. I'd be screwed.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Huston said:
It is not so much what I HAVE/HAD TO do its more of what I CANT/COULDNT do.

One example: I really want blue hair but never have and probably never will because what my limitations will become due to people’s perceptions of “professional” and “kept”.
Here here Huoston! I want my Mowhawk back! Only Green or dark purple this time. I always thought it was fun to watch white people walk to the other side of the street to avoid me. Of course, everyobody who was black had this tendency to ask if I was a Nazi Skinhead. Go figure! It was a lot of fun! :)
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
Change my political party affilliation.

I was sad to have to start wearing professional clothes to work again after i left the private sector, and i still have problems remember to put my shoes back on when i run back to our office's kitchen to refill my coffee cup. fortunately, i don't have stinky feet, and i'm usually wearing long skirts so no one can tell i'm barefoot. shoes are just so damn restrictive. especially when you're 8 month pregnant. :)
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
ZG posted
You need to confront me and let me know when you're mad at me.
I had the same conversation at my last review. My response was, and its true, I don't knoiw I am mad at a person until its too late, then you really don't want me to confront you.

I've had to accept being belittled in public is part of my job description and that my personal life is worth less because I don't have kids or a wife.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
I was once instructed to dye my hair back to it's natural color. I was going for silver but the closest I was able to get was a very shiny white. And yes, it looked as bad as it sounds.

Told to wear a tie everyday. Including those days I didn't have to meet with clients.

The boss at my last job told me I needed to register as a Democrat.

Nothing has been asked of me at this job. I have a great boss, as well as Civil Service and union protection. :)
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
the dress here is pretty much what ever you want, basically because a lot of people end up doing field work. only the head honcos were a suit.
i remember when i worked at a pizza place/bar and my boss yelled at me for wearing a wrinkled shirt. i later found out that the place closed down. take that rasshole.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
For the most part - work place attire is professional casual, unless we have a meeting, or think we might run into the Town Supervisor. She is old school - women should NOT wear pants/pant suits - only skirts and men should always be clean shaven and in a tie.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
donk said:
I've had to accept .......[that] my personal life is worth less because I don't have kids or a wife.
I've dealt with that one from both sides.

Prior to married life, I was often looked at in the workplace as the one who should take the late afternoon/evening meetings.

My wife & I once both worked for bosses who had neither SO's nor children. When the workday ended and we'd go home to be with family & child, the looks of scorn/jealosy were obvious and persistant.

In summary, prejudice SUCKS.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
martini said:
Interesting....so the reaction was???

Good thing there's not a policy against baldness. I'd be screwed.
I had to explain to the bald boss that if I was violating some code of conduct, so was he, but since i could do something about it and he couldnt, short of the Hair Club for MenTM then he should just deal with it. At the end of the meeting, he just asking for a little warning next time. :) Yeah fat chance bucko.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
SGB said:
I've dealt with that one from both sides.

Prior to married life, I was often looked at in the workplace as the one who should take the late afternoon/evening meetings.

My wife & I once both worked for bosses who had neither SO's nor children. When the workday ended and we'd go home to be with family & child, the looks of scorn/jealosy were obvious and persistant.

In summary, prejudice SUCKS.
Singles have it rough. Some management think that the singles should take the late hours because they don't have to get home to a wife or kids. Then there are the married employees who always use the "family responsibilities" excuse to be late, leave early, get out of assignments, or otherwise get away with things their fellow employees can't do.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
Cardinal said:
Singles have it rough. Some management think that the singles should take the late hours because they don't have to get home to a wife or kids. Then there are the married employees who always use the "family responsibilities" excuse to be late, leave early, get out of assignments, or otherwise get away with things their fellow employees can't do.
An OT rebuttal: it really is up to the married/family employees to change that attitude. I have never missed a night meeting (in 16 years) because I have always been able to make child-care arrangements. I even volunteer for extra night assignments (such as running community meetings), just as anyone else who wants to "up" their value to the organization would do. It is not fair for married/parent employees to take advantage of their family status.

That said, yes, there are times I take paid time off for school events, doctor's appointments, sick kid, etc. But the singles get to take their time off for fun vacations instead!
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
219
Points
9
[QUOTE by Downtown]Change my political party affilliation.[/QUOTE]



[QUOTE by Biscuit]The boss at my last job told me I needed to register as a Democrat. [/QUOTE]

WTF!?!?! O_O

That can't be legal, not in most states. What could they do, fire you? The only way I think that could be legal (at least, the only way it is in Maryland) is if you are a political appointee. Can't do that with civil service, and I don't think they let the private sector get away with it either.

If I'm wrong about that, then there's some laws out there that need serious changing.
 

Queen B

Cyburbian
Messages
3,178
Points
25
Another reason for being in this profession. Don't have to dress up. Can if I want but if I need to go to the field just as easy to dress casual.
I would be glad to dress up for public hearings but when the commissioners are showing up in jeans and shorts it is hard for me to see a reason why I should dress up.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
B'lieve said:

That can't be legal, not in most states. What could they do, fire you? The only way I think that could be legal (at least, the only way it is in Maryland) is if you are a political appointee. Can't do that with civil service, and I don't think they let the private sector get away with it either.

If I'm wrong about that, then there's some laws out there that need serious changing.
I'm not saying that my actual position depends upon my party affilliation, and I don't want to say too much here, BUT in certain areas of the country with certain entrenched political systems, if you have any ambition for promotion/advancement, being registered and active in the "correct" party will benefit you in the long run.
 
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