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Why NY State is going to hell

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
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4,473
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25
From the Planetizen link.
http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=259661

This money -- $300 million from the state and $300 million from the city -- would be the largest taxpayer giveaway to a sports franchise in the nation's history.
Pataki and Bloomberg would use three public authorities under the governor's control to push this deal through without public bidding, public review through the city's land-use review process or approval by the City Council. Charles Gargano, head of the Empire State Development Corp., has testified that they plan to do it without approval of the state Legislature, either. If the Jets were good for a state's economy, you would think that New Jersey would have tried to keep them. But in waving goodbye, New Jersey Sports & Exhibition Authority President George Zoffinger said, "We don't like to lose a tenant, but we have decided in New Jersey that our priorities are in the areas of education, health care and social services."
Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr :-@

This state continues to show that it likes to screw the taxpayers.

And still they can't pass a budget on time for the last 20 years.

But to get around everything they use public authorities so the citizens can not vote on the matter. Same with the gambling and casino mess.

I could go on and on about why the state government needs reform, but the way everything is run by backdoor deals nothing will ever change.
 

Elisabeth

Cyburbian
Messages
157
Points
7
NYS politics is very frustrating, indeed. And since I work in the thick of this environment and see how little gets done, it's truly sickening. Conflicting egos amongst legislators and an inability to see the needs of the state, as a whole, and not just New York City or Upstate, separately. Also irritating is the fact, as you probably know, that our local taxes are, on average, 70% higher than in other states.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Elisabeth said:
NYS politics is very frustrating, indeed. And since I work in the thick of this environment and see how little gets done, it's truly sickening. Conflicting egos amongst legislators and an inability to see the needs of the state, as a whole, and not just New York City or Upstate, separately. Also irritating is the fact, as you probably know, that our local taxes are, on average, 70% higher than in other states.
The news here did a series on the problems with state government, with the mention of public authorities that could work around voter approvals or even legislature approvals. The also had a nice piece last week about the scandals and corruptions of our finely elected representatives. Egos seems to be a huge problem among the incumbants and of course local taxes are the highest in the nation. Medicaid is a huge drain on the counties, yet the state has yet to come up with a solution.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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20,173
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51
I am going to get yelled at for this I think, but someday when I have kids (I know that there should be several steps before this), they will go to private school, and most likely a Catholic school. I have only been Catholic for a short time, and I went to public schools, but I have too many friends that are teachers in the public school system who talk about how they do not have the funding for many of the basic programs, their class sizes are always growing, and every year the budget gets cut more and more. Those who say that this does not have an impact on the quality of education don't know any school age kids.

I don't think that MI has ever built a stadium, but they have done other dumb things when is has come to money.
 
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ugh. My new favorite letter to the Times Union was from a gentleman that suggested the only way for the City of Schenectady to see any improvement is if Joe Bruno moves there.

This is all very frustrating.... no budget, and now the legislators are on 6 week vacation. WTF?!?

michaelskis said:
I am going to get yelled at for this I think, but someday when I have kids (I know that there should be several steps before this), they will go to private school, and most likely a Catholic school. I have only been Catholic for a short time, and I went to public schools, but I have too many friends that are teachers in the public school system who talk about how they do not have the funding for many of the basic programs, their class sizes are always growing, and every year the budget gets cut more and more. Those who say that this does not have an impact on the quality of education don't know any school age kids.

I don't think that MI has ever built a stadium, but they have done other dumb things when is has come to money.
Oh - I forgot to get to you in my fury over the state legislature!

Anyway - I'm torn on this subject. We are in a great school district, I don't feel like I'd have any reservations about sending Jack off to public school. However, you're right about the pressures on public schools - increased testing, increased class size, reduced budgets, reduced services, improperly implemented inclusion programs - there are a lot of school districts (including posh suburban ones) that I wouldn't feel great about sending my kid to.

HOWEVER - the cost of private school education - including/especially Catholic School, is outpacing inflation. Good friends of ours switched their 8th grader out of catholic school to a public school because he couldn't get the AP courses, including technology such as AutoCad drafting, etc, that our school district offers.

its such a catch 22
 
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SGB

Cyburbian
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3,388
Points
26
State politics in NY have been a mess way too long, and the adverse affects of this on its political subdivisions only grows worse each year.

This whole mess has become so institutionalized that it won't change any time soon.

Of course, I blame everything on the politicians and population in the lower Hudson valley. (With the possible exception of TSC, who's heart remains upstate despite her current locale. ;) )
 

Elisabeth

Cyburbian
Messages
157
Points
7
In total agreement with SGB, a lot of NY's problems do stem from the abuse of power of many downstate, specifically, NYC politicians. I get ticked to think about how many tax dollars go to support the greatest city in the world--a place where the average rent of a one bedroom or studio apartment is at least (and this is on the low end) 1000 bucks a month. We need reform and we need it STAT. This is one source of information on the topic.

In regards to private and/or Catholic school vs. public--it's a tough one. I'm a product of the Albany City School District and Downtown and others from this area can attest that Albany doesn't have the best academic reputation. In fact, I think it's one of the worst school districts in upstate NY. However, my parents didn't want to leave the city and they felt there were no private school options (aside from the very, very pricey Emma Willard) that would have afforded me better opportunities. I took AP classes, had great teachers (many of whom have since retired), and dealt with all kinds of people from all over the world. I was a minority in high school, which in retrospect seems strange, but at the time, it never phased me.

Having said that, I went on to do my undergrad at The Catholic University of America where 85% of the kids come from Catholic and/or private high schools. I can't tell you how many times kids looked at me like I was crazy because I said I went to public school from grades 1-12. In my opinion, these kids were very sheltered and attending a school in a working class and predominantly black neighborhood in Washington, DC was a real change/shock for them. Bottomline, is that I never realized what a truly excellent education I recieved at Albany High School until I was away from it--I can honestly say that it's a high school that's a microcosm of the world. And my classes in high school were no different than my classes in college--small, orderly, and quiet.

I guess a lot depends on where you live. When the time comes for me to decide where to send my kids for school, I just want to send them to where they can get the best education possible--private or public. I could go on more about what needs to happen to make the Albany Schools better--we all know what a huge factor the quality of schools is for getting people to move to an area is, but that's a thread on it's own (but not a very interesting one for many of you).
 

SGB

Cyburbian
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3,388
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26
Elisabeth said:
We need reform and we need it STAT. {URL=http://www.fixalbany.com/]This is one source of information on the topic.[/URL]
Nice website, but it seems to be focused on one issue only - the fiscal impacts of the transfer of financial resposibilities for Medicaid costs from the state to the county.

I totally agree that this is a major issue. However, in a state where the governor and legislature have failed for the last 20 years to pass a state budget on time, I can't help but suspect there is a much deeper systemic problem at hand here.
 

tsc

Cyburbian
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1,905
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23
Government would be great...if we could just get rid of the politicians....
Been upstate and downstate..... there definately is a short end of the stick.
 
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