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Why the RIAA is going to Hell

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
Points
29
I am done with buying CDs for quite some time. its their drive to make money no matter the cost and they turn out crappy products in the process.

nop sorry no more RIAA Cd's for me.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,387
Points
25
Yeah, they are clearly getting a bit desperate.

This, too, shall pass.

The recording industry as we know it is about to undergo dramatic changes in business practices. Eventually, we will all be getting our media entertainment (music/movies) through pay-per-tune services. Those without internet access will be able to get customized media at their local Sprawl-Mart (tm).
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
How are Eminem and J-Lo going to eat if the record industry doesn't sue 12 year olds? Part of me wants to see these corporations bankrupted and the CEO's working as cashiers at Sam Goody. The prices charged for CD's are crazy. They can drop prices down 30% and still make handsome profits. "Starving artists" mostly like file-sharing because its the only way people get to hear their music.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
I have calculated the value of an entire CD that has been downloaded, burned, placed in a CD case, labels printed and covers created costs about $5 a CD. This includes the time in making such a CD and costs of materials to have a disc worth having.

a CD at a price of $7 including liner notes would be worth taking a chance on.

The cost of producing a CD is a $1.50 they say. Yet the price of a CD has never come down since they were put onto the market. Something smells fishy! Bet the companies would love a law saying they can't charge more than 10% above cost for thier product (my proposal).

Why can't I go to the website, pay my $7 fee per CD, then download the thing to my hard drive including the liner notes and labels to print off on my home computer. They would have no shipping costs, environmental impact costs, middle man, printers fee, or any other crap that gets tacked on to the cost and they would still make 700% profit by the end of it.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
First the RIAA tries to stop the release of CD-RW drives and media (they get a small % of all blank CD sales as a result). Then the shut down Napster...then Audiogalaxy. Now they have failed to shut down Kazaa, so they go after the colleges. That doesn't work either, so they have these lawsuits against people like this 12 year old. Do they think that this will stop file sharing? They are dead wrong. I will predict that within 6 months, Kazaa will have a patch that will allow users to be untraceable. Plus there are alternatives, like newsgroups (by far the best way to get music, IMHO.

I will admit that file sharing is wrong (even though I do it regularly), and it may be hurting the industry, but the industry needs to change now, or it will continue to be in decline. CDs should be priced around 8-10 dollars tops. Every label should make the complete album available via a website or subscription service. (Apple's I-tunes has had something like 10 million paid downloads since it was launched..and that is only mac users). Charge 99cents per track, or 5-6 bucks for a full album and I think you would see sales go up.

I read an article about 6 months ago showing how the RIAA is lying about their numbers. There were far fewer releases in 2002 than in 2001, which is one of the main reasons for the decline in sales. The article (ill post it if I can find it) essentialy says if you have 200 releases in 1 year and 150 in the next year, sales are obviously going to go down. The RIAA never mentions that. They also didn't take into account the crappy economy as a reason people didn't buy more 18 dollar cds.
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
Don't forget the fact that most of the music out there now is just plain manure. How many times have you bought a CD based on a hit song or two and quickly discovered that the rest of the CD is crap? And if you try to sell the CD back, you're only offered maybe a maximum of $3. Why even bother wasting your money?
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,244
Points
23
I have never file swapped and to be honest, don't know how to do it. I check out cd's from my library at no cost and burn them myself. I do a google search for the album cover and print it out. Very few of the cd's I have burned I would have bought if I knew how the music was going to sound like. Good thing I did not spend the $18 for the cd. Case in point Metallica's St. Anger.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
And you either hear too much of an artist or nothing at all. Why is there a need to buy a Linkin Park or Brittney Spears CD when you're going to have 5 of their singles driven down your throat for the next year? People like me without broadband at home never get to hear a second of anything different.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Repo Man said:
Plus there are alternatives, like newsgroups (by far the best way to get music, IMHO.
Shhhhh, keep the secret or they will be coming after those next, Then were screwed! :)
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Planderella said:
Don't forget the fact that most of the music out there now is just plain manure.
Contrary to the popular belief that the music when you were grwoing up was better than it is now, is incorect.

There has ALWYS been A LOT OF CRAP music out there. not just now.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
The funny thing is, if I have downloaded a music file and really enjoy it, I just may buy the CD. I would never go out and buy a CD of music I am not familiar with, without the opportunity to listen and decide if I like it, or if it is the right version of the song. Maybe that is unusual, but then it does happen and the RIAA will only turn off customers like me by attacking 12-year old kids and grandfathers.
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
Duke Of Dystopia said:
Contrary to the popular belief that the music when you were grwoing up was better than it is now, is incorect.

There has ALWYS been A LOT OF CRAP music out there. not just now.
I never said the music of the past (when I was growing up or even before then) isn't as bad as today's music.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Planderella said:
I never said the music of the past (when I was growing up or even before then) isn't as bad as today's music.
No, you didn't say those things, but I have heard that enough and that is what it sounded like to me, I was just pointing out an issue that reocurss every generation :) I have many friends who are stuck in the 80's never to escape :) And the professors I had lamented constantly about the music of the 80's & 90's on how it was all crap :)

To get back on topic, I now go to concearts of groups nobody has heard because I pirated thier music. I buy thier CD's when before I never would have known they existed. I take my kids with me. They have not lost any money, only gained a customer. What we have here is market failure.

If I get one good or interesting cut off a CD I am now happy.
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
Messages
1,361
Points
23
I understand that artists need to make a living from their crafts, music in this case of discussion, but CD's are too damn expensive. Bands like Metallica, which caused a stink about music sharing, and the RIAA should take a lesson from bands that allow fans to record their concerts while in attendance - Grateful Dead, Phish, etc. Those bands, inclusive of the revived Dead, have made and will continue to make exhuberant loads of cash but the fans benefit from free music sharing as well.
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
I would love to see a day when there is no such thing as music labels...or at least major labels. I would love to see bands have their own website where you can download their music, videos, and interviews, buy t-shirts and other merchandise, etc.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,244
Points
23
Big Easy King said:
Bands like Metallica, which caused a stink about music sharing, and the RIAA should take a lesson from bands that allow fans to record their concerts while in attendance - Grateful Dead, Phish, etc. Those bands, inclusive of the revived Dead, have made and will continue to make exhuberant loads of cash but the fans benefit from free music sharing as well.
That is exactly how Metallica got their following. Fans bootlegging thier tapes and the band did not care. They had no radio airplay until the late 80's. Their music got around BECAUSE of the fans bootlegging and swapping.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
If I like the whole album.. I buy it (If I can find it here...)

First comes the .ogg / .mp3 trial test ;)
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
Duke Of Dystopia said:
Shhhhh, keep the secret or they will be coming after those next, Then were screwed! :)
they've been there for YEARS. and also for years on the IRC, and on the web, on everything.

I consider myself infamous for possibly being the first, if not one of the first people to recieve a letter from the RIAA for 'sharing' my music on my computer... in late 1996.

i remember a college judiciary official saying.. mp what?

I
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
SlaveToTheGrind said:
That is exactly how Metallica got their following. Fans bootlegging thier tapes and the band did not care. They had no radio airplay until the late 80's. Their music got around BECAUSE of the fans bootlegging and swapping.
The record industry sees none or little of concert profits. That is why many artists contracts specify recording restrictions and rights. Bootlegs are highly discouraged by the industry.
 
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