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News 📰 WILDFIRES in Western U.S. & Canada *2020 pandemic edition*

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This is the "2020 pandemic edition" because
the abundance of Covid-19 cases make evacuation of
wildfire areas far more difficult:

Are people in wildfire areas more reluctant to evacuate,
and then more reluctant to stay in shelters,
because shelters can not ensure protection from Covid-19?
Exactly what are the shelters doing about Covid-19 situations?
___________________________________________________

Website with interactive map of wildfires
in western states in the U.S.:

The right margin has a list of active
wildfires
in California, with info on:

  • acreage
  • percentage of wild fire containment
  • time/date of latest info

The interactive wildfire map shows, as expected,
that by far the largest number of wildfires are in California.

There are also wildfires in:
Oregon, Washington State,
Arizona, New Mexico,
Nevada, Utah, Colorado,
Idaho, Wyoming, Montana.

I did not expect to see one sizable wildfire in Northern Texas.
It is north of Amarillo, on the N.W. side of Lake Meredith.

I also did not expect to see a wildfire in S.E. Colorado
that is raging on the border of Oklahoma.
__________________________________________________

The following website has an interactive, up-to-date map
of wildfires in Canada:

This map shows, as expected, that the Canadian wildfires
are concentrated in the Southwest-most provinces.
There are also large swaths of wildfires in Canada's
Southeastern seaboard.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
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3,064
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Our son is currently five blocks from the evacuation zone in Santa Cruz. He is going to Las Vegas if he has to leave. Sand gets hot but doesn't burn.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
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30,313
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74
My BIL's ex recently had to move into a friend's place after both her house and her parents house (literally next door) burned to the ground.
 
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-bump-
From RTDNTOTO:
118934364_10158694164337390_2525583175492125410_n.jpg
 

DVD

Cyburbian
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15,557
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53
We're getting haze and cooler temps from these fires. I like the cooler temps, but the haze is killing our air quality. Damn California finding another way to screw up a perfectly good state.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
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30,313
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74
In-laws' family have already lost two homes now my BIL's house is threatened.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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20,962
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I have been hearing some tragic stories in regards to the west coast wildfires. The stories of the loss of life, property damage, and environmental issues are just overwhelming. I know some of the folks in here are dealing the the smoke and haze from it.

Moving forward, what policies and regulations do you think would help to minimize events like this? I ask because it happens more and more frequently right now, and I know that fires are part of the cyclical nature of that environment, but I don't think that they are to this scale.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
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11,358
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52
I think the communities where these fires are most prevalent and destructive need to take a serious look at their development patterns and where they allow new housing to be built. It's a tough pill to swallow, but until people realize that sure its beautiful, but if you build in heavily wooded areas that get little rainfall in the best of years, you're setting yourself up for disaster.

It's up to state governments, the BLM, and local municipalities to put meaningful limits on where people can build, but I don't see that happening anytime soon.

That leaves things up to the insurance companies. Unlike flood policies, which the federal government underwrites and subsidizes thereby incentivizing people to build in hurricane and flood-prone areas, there isn't such a program with these wildfire-prone areas. At some point (and maybe it's already happening on a micro scale), private insurers are going to stop offering policies in some of these areas or making them exorbitantly expensive and disincentivizing people from (re)building there
 
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Mon Sept 14, 2020
California Governor Gavin Newsom Confronts Donald Trump On Climate Change, Wildfires: “57% Of The Land In This State Is Federal”
__________________________________

Wade Crowfoot, California's Natural Resources Secretary, told Trump that blaming insufficient forest management ignores a large part of the story: climate science. This conversation followed:
(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)
WADE CROWFOOT: If we ignore that science and sort of put our head in the sand and think it's all about vegetation management, we're not going to succeed together protecting Californians.
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: OK. It'll start getting cooler. You just watch.
CROWFOOT: I wish science agreed with you.
(LAUGHTER)
TRUMP: Well, I don't think science knows, actually.
Source:
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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26,762
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Trump awards Distinguished Flying Cross to guardsmen who helped rescue hundreds from wildfires

The award recognizing acts of heroism and extraordinary achievement in aerial flight
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,313
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74
Trump awards Distinguished Flying Cross to guardsmen who helped rescue hundreds from wildfires
Query: why isn't the title of that article "Guardsmen who helped rescue hundreds from wildfires awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross"
I mean why should that other name mentioned be sharing a headline with those brave heroes?
 
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This topic fell down to the 4th page of the FAC, so I guess it's time for an update.

Once more, this interactive, Google-like map is great for timely info on the wildfire situation,
in California and other U.S. States:

Canada's British Columbia province wildfire map:

Canada's Alberta province wildfire map:


I can not find factually verifiable current maps of wildfires in Mexico--specifically, in regions that share a border with the U.S.

Satellites show (online) where fires are burning in Mexico; but the satellite info does not reliably & publicly distinguish between wildfires--and controlled/utilitarian fires (ie. campfires, outdoor cooking areas, etc).
 
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Not long ago, California's rampant Wildfire Season used to be considered "over" by Thanksgiving time, and certainly by December. Not any more.:disappointed"

Last Wednesday night, December 2, a house fire sparked a very major wildfire -dubbed #BondFire - in Orange County's Silverado Canyon area.
Details unfolding:

12/4/2020
Strong winds fuel 6,400-acre wildfire in Southern California

Today - 12/5/2020
Containment Grows In Bond Fire; 10 Structures Already Damaged
The fire has burned 7,375 acres so far.


Twitter feed of Orange County Fire Authority:
Twitter feed of #BondFire:

Orange County Fire Authority's Facebook page (public):

_____________________________________________________________________________________
Of Disaster Mitigation interest:

World's largest helitanker drops water on Bond Fire

A CH-47 Chinook, the world's largest helitanker, was deployed to drop water and fire suppressant on the Bond Fire in Orange County, California, on Dec. 4. The tanker can carry up to 3,000 gallons of water or suppressant.
Video footage:
 
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-bump-
Should the name of this topic be changed to
The NEVERENDING Wildfires Thread
?

Western U.S. could see more wildfires in 2021​

[T]he unofficial season for wildfire activity stretches from May to October, but the unofficial nature of that range has been proven already in 2021. As of May 1, 2020, some 220,823 acres of wildfire destruction had occurred, and 2020 wound up being the most destructive wildfire season in U.S. history.

In 2021, that number has more than doubled. From Jan. 1 to April 29, the pre-season fire activity has already consumed more than 461,000 acres...


U.S. wildfires news articles for the past month,
(in reverse chronological order):

 
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SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
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1,706
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31
What (if any) measures will be used to determine the effectiveness of the 2021 restrictions in Utah?
Where you can and can't launch fireworks in Utah this year
Good question. The easiest answer will be to determine how many fires can/are be attributed to fireworks. So far (fingers crossed) I don't think we've had the usual number of fires caused by fireworks. Working?
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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20,962
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58
I appreciate the discussion in this thread, because I think as planners, we are in a good position to encourage changes in development patterns that will do less harm than past developments. Something that I am kicking around right now is trying to find a way to reduce automobile dependency and auto oriented development. In rereading the book "The High Cost of Free Parking" I am trying to figure out ways to recalculate our parking requirements, (Hence the parking question in the Planning/Zoning section) in a way that will substantially reduce the number of vacant and wasted spaces that we have for off street parking. If it is impervious surface, I rather see it be a building than a vacant parking space.

I also think that the effects of these fires is something that we don't really take into personal consideration until the effect us. For example, a couple weeks ago I was on the south shore of Lake Superior and the fires from Canada put a haze over the city. People took notice. But an hour south, people didn't even realize that there was a fire.
 
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