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Windsor Terrace: a rowhouse enclave in Cleveland

Dan

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Windsor Terrace is a single block of old (~1900) townhouses about two miles east of downtown Cleveland. The lone block is completely surrounded by a jumble of industrial uses and vacant land cleared for urban renewal decades ago. It's not part of a historic district, and I've been unable to find any information about it. It would be interesting to know how this little enclave survived the industrialization of the surrounding neighborhood, and urban renewal projects between the 1950s and 1980s.

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I drive past Windsor Terrace all the time when I go to downtown Cleveland, but today I had my digital camera with me. Visit the Cyburbia Gallery for larger images.

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Seabishop

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Those rowhouses need a shave.

Stupid question but are rowhouses like that typical in Cleveland?
 

Dan

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Stupid question but are rowhouses like that typical in Cleveland?
Not really. In the city, plain frame "industrial vernacular" single family and two-flat houses predominate, followed by small two to four-story brick apartment buildings - often mixed in with frame houses on the same block. Here's an example in the infamous Hough neighborhood.

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Row housing is rare.
 

mendelman

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I would bet the reason for their odd placement is due to 19th century residential speculation. The land was probably just beyond the urban fringe at the time and built as a kind of isolated pod in anticipation of more residential development headed its way. But some market condition probably intervened and pushed the development of the area into more industrial/commercial than residential.

I doubt it was worker's housing built by a nearby industrial company. The number of units is probably to small for the number of workers needed a in typical large scale 19th century industry (plus the big industrialists would have been the only ones able to do such worker housing - think Pullman on Chicago's southside).
 
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Windsor Terrace

Built in 1905 by Theodore F. Laist, Windsor Terrace was developed as worker's housing for the surrounding area. Laist went on to become a senior architect in Chicago and a major in the engineering corps of the U.S. Army. He was denied title of City of Chicago Architect based on his inability to pass the civil commission standards for architect, as he was better known as a builder. These town homes survived because of the unique multiple property ownership, as well as lackluster interest in redevelopment of this area.
 

Rebecca Groth

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Here’s some info on it.

I’m doing research trying to find out how one can live there.
 
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Planit

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Based on your pictures from 11 years ago, the place isn't vey pedestrian friendly. Cars on the sidewalk. I guess you walk in the street.

Interesting little patch of houses.
 
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