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Uses Wineries in agricultural districts

ROBERT

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
Here in Kentucky tobacco production has been reduced by 80%. As a result farmers are looking at alternate ways to utilize their land. I am looking for ways to accommodate/ regulate non- traditional uses on agriculture land. How do other communities address wineries, greenhouses, composting or other non conventional agricultural uses in ag zones, uses that may also be considered business uses?
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
Robert,

Think outside the bluegrass box. In other areas, wineries, greenhouses, etc. are considered agricultural uses. Consider the impacts of the possible uses to see what controls may be needed. Will there be more traffic generation than a truck farm that sells veggies at the roadside? Will wineries turn into retail outlets that need commercial water and sewer? Does a composting operation become industrial in its looks: and even then, any more so than a farm that mixes cattle feed?

If the impacts are greater than the usual realm of agricultural, conditional uses may be the answer. The problem is that the possibilities are different than the traditional bluegrass farmers are accustomed to. Out here in Kansas cattle country, people get all up in arms over pigs. But both are livestock and agricultural.

Do what you can to help the farmer remain productive.
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,371
Points
29
Hi: I don't completely agree with Mike. Some of the uses that some communities call ag -- like confined animal feeding -- are industrial in every sense of the word, especially at a large scale. That doesn't mean they can't be permitted where they are appropriate, but we're kidding ourselves to call them agriculture, which is properly defined as an activity that relies on the local resource.

But from a practical planning point-of-view, I do agree. You could approach the expansion and diversification of your local ag through the CUP process Mike suggests or through performance zoning, which is how I would do it, but the point is to focus on impacts, not labels. Traffic generation, use of chemicals, hours of operation, etc.
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
Lee,

Sorry about the slip of the keyboard. Our county treats CFOs as industrial enterprises. The point I wanted to emphasize is the local perception. A cattle CFO out here receives little comment while pigs drive the locals crazy--even when the impacts are similar. Central KY will have problems accepting "ag" uses other than their traditional horses, cattle, and a patch of tobacco to (formerly) make ends meet.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Don't forget about ag tourism. Winery tours, scenic routes, farm produce (Oregon has a 'fruit loop') all can help the farmers, but create a new set of problems as well when heavier tourist traffic demands better roads, farmers all want retail outlets, etc.

Here in Wisconsin, and also where I have practiced in Illinois, farm uses are considered very liberally. There was a point you could do almost anything on a farm. But as our happy cows are herded from the rolling pastures onto miserable feed lots, the neighbors are beginning to object.

Where is the line between agricultural, industrial and retail? Perhaps it is somewhere between traditional farming practices and modern techniques of mass production.

Sorry if this is not particularly helpful.
 
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