Wood/wire fence: is there a name for this?

Dan

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#1
In the last hours of writing the land development code, I just noticed a style of fence that I've only seen in the Austin area (although it may exist elsewhere). It has a wood frame, and a mesh of thick woven wire. Is there a formal name for this type of fence?

 

Dan

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#8
After doing a bit more research, I found wire mesh, hog wire and cable rail. In the code, I'm going to call it "Wood frame wire (mesh, hog wire, cable rail)". Thanks!
 
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#9
After doing a bit more research, I found wire mesh, hog wire and cable rail. In the code, I'm going to call it "Wood frame wire (mesh, hog wire, cable rail)". Thanks!
Brings back fond memories - I like it!

Will you be including metal-framed (mesh, hog wire, cable rail) fences in this particular piece of code?
If so, will you be adding electrical metal frames?

Also, will your code include the coyote rollers that some residents install on top of their low fences? No kidding- my friends there say that the coyotes have become garbage scavengers. Over the years, the critters have become increasingly less fearful of houses/humans and have become suburban/urban pests...

Since coyotes 'jump over' fences by hopping on top and then immediately hopping to the other side, the rollers cause them to fall flat to the ground; they may die immediately or incur wounds from which they often don't recover.

Finally, if you decide to include in your code coyote rollers on fences, will it direct people to that portion of the code that delineates proper coyote disposal?


P.S. That particular fence image in your first post... what a bad deterrent to coyotes! They are known to dig the dirt underneath to get to the other side...
 

fringe

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#10
A stouter grid with bigger gauge wire that is popular for deck guards in this area (though doesn't meet building code if more than four inches) is called "cattle panel", and comes in pieces about four feet by ten.
 

Suburb Repairman

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#12
I've nicknamed this style of fence as "Urban faux Cowboy" fencing. It is something that is peppered all over central Texas. It is used out in my area and we've been working on code as well to address it. Technically, it doesn't meet building codes when used as a railing because it is "climbable", but most CBOs I know are looking the other way.

Most of these are for decorative purposes only; no security element. It's a cheap way to get a fairly high-impact rustic look.
 
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#14
I like this fence! We have been looking for a type of fence to put around a small part of our yard, where we will let the dogs out. We have not wanted to use anything tall or anything that will block the view, as there will be gardens adjacent to the fence, and we want to keep the open feel we have now. I thought about making something with cable, but there is a chance the dogs could get out. This is a much better solution.
 

Luca

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#15
Cardinal, how big are your dogs? if they're not tiny, a picket fence willh old them in and look better.
 

Cardinal

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#16
Cardinal, how big are your dogs? if they're not tiny, a picket fence willh old them in and look better.
They are average sized dogs - 40 and 65 pounds. The issue is that we want a fence that is mostly transparent to preserve our views.
 
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