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Would you want your child to work on the 110th floor of a rebuilt WTC?

Would you want your child to work on the 110th floor of a rebuilt WTC?

  • Yes, terrorists would unlikely strike the same place again.

    Votes: 1 5.0%
  • Yes, terrorists can't make us change, the risks are worth it.

    Votes: 3 15.0%
  • No, it would just be a big new target.

    Votes: 5 25.0%
  • No, mega skyscrapers are bad human scape, regardless of 9-11.

    Votes: 6 30.0%
  • Don't know / Don't care.

    Votes: 1 5.0%
  • Other, see below

    Votes: 4 20.0%

  • Total voters
    20

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Many of the suggestions for rebuilding the NYC WTC have formed around rebuilding structures as tall, or taller, than the original buildings. The reasoning behind this runs the gamut from thumbing our collective noses at terrorism to replicating the original skyline with a "signature" structure.

My question is a variation on a time old "truth teller" question: Would you want your daughter to work there?

Answers could be:
Yes for reasons such as 1) terrorists would never strike a third time or 2) we can't be afraid of terrorists and if I had to sacrifice my daughter to prove a point, so be it.
No for reasons such as 1) It would just be a big target or 2) Mega skyscrapers are bad human scape and poor place making, regardless of recent history (9-11).
Don't know / Don't care because your tired of hearing about WTC planning.
Other as explained below.

My answer would be No, because I don't think mega skyscrapers are acceptable human habitat and damage place making. Although, I also suspect that a new tall WTC building will also become just a new challenge for terrrorists. I would rather see the site renewed with buildings no taller than half the original buildings height.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
Note to moderator:

Ooops, I meant to put this under the Design, Space and Place catagory. Feel free to move it if you think that's a better fit.
 
Messages
5,352
Points
31
Even prior to 9-11, I never thought tall buildings were safe (blame it on the million times that I've seen the "Towering Inferno"). hey are architectural and engineering wonders, but that's about it.

Mod note.....I got a little "P.C." and changed "daughter" to "child."
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
IMHO: 1.- skyscrapers are way disproportionate, Hence they aren't very apealling, at least for me.
2.- they are not safe buildings, and will never be.
3.- since they are waaay too tall, they are completely out of scale with other buildings and to people.
4.- Learn the lesson for crying out loud! Towers that represent your greatness + unhappy Arab Terrorists + Planes (and quite breachable airport security) = DISASTER!

I don't think that the current fire safety technology or disaster design can give you safety on buildings higher that 50 floors.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
I would have been one of the ones who quit my job on 9-11 rather than go back into a skyscraper! I hope my kid inherits my overwhelming fear of heights and elevators (reading Arthur Hailey's "Hotel" freaked me out about elevators).
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
Actually, I hope my kid works someday on the 210th floor, right below the anti-aircraft guns on the roof.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
realist speaks in me

my kid is going to do what they want when they're old enough to work in a 110 story building -so it's good if they like and I have no kids so I can blah blah blah all I want about this.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
The Irish one said:
my kid is going to do what they want when they're old enough

Anticipating the no boundaries, don’t interfere, let them do what makes them feel good, approach to today's parenting I intentionally worded the question "would you want" instead of the older style "would you let".

Regardless of what your kid decides to do, would you feel good, not good, don't care, or other about that office location?
 

OfficialPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
942
Points
24
This is interesting,

So when is a building too tall?

We just approved a 1000ft condo / hotel today, the height being one of the major selling points. If people are willing to live/work that high why not have em?
 

troy

Member
Messages
68
Points
4
I tend to feel uncomfortable near the windows of any structure more than 2 stories tall. If my daughter was working in such a place, I'd be unlikely to visit her office/workstation.

Besides, New York is a long way from the rest of the family, so...

No! I wouldn't want my daughter working in a rebuilt WTC building!

If she chose to work in such a place, I would be proud of her decision to do so. Its better to die on your feet than live on your knees.
 

nash

Member
Messages
12
Points
1
I think it's fairly common knowledge that heights among a certain level are economically unfeasible (in terms of utility management). In addition to that, the commercial nature of that building contributed mightily to the deserted no-man's land that the financial district was after 6:00pm every night. Had there been any residential component to the site, the story may have been entirely different for that district.

I'm just paraphrasing arguments made in 1961 by Jane Jacobs.

All the same, it would be interesting to know what the impact of the terror attacks would have been if there was anything approaching a residential balance at the WTC. But then, it wouldn't really have been the World Trade Center, would it?

I spent a year or so working at One Battery Park Plaza, not far from the WTC, and I always wonder (like anyone who worked in Manhattan has, I'm sure) 'what if' I had been there, or anyone I knew. I don't have any kids. But I'd probably be pretty nervous about that if I did.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,898
Points
27
On one hand, I don't think we should live in fear. You have a greater chance of getting into a car accident, for heaven's sake.

On the other hand, I've never been all that comfortable with heights myself. I attended a hearing in the WTC back in the 1980s and wouldn't allow myself to get too close to the windows.

I think I would leave it to my child to decide how he or she feels about working in a tall building - knowing the potential risks.
 
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