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Zoning enforcement of temporary structures

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
Our code defines structures as anything having a permanent location that is affixed to the ground. Our code also states that swimming pools must be reviewed by zoning. How does your community handle the new Wal-Mart special temporary "blow-up" 3ft and 4ft swimming pools? Are they reviewed for zoning?
 

SideshowBob

Cyburbian
Messages
110
Points
6
boiker said:
Our code defines structures as anything having a permanent location that is affixed to the ground. Our code also states that swimming pools must be reviewed by zoning. How does your community handle the new Wal-Mart special temporary "blow-up" 3ft and 4ft swimming pools? Are they reviewed for zoning?
We are just about to go through taht same thing. We do not have the "permanent location that is affixed to the ground" so our inflatable pools are treated like regular pools. There is some sentiment for backing off on that a bit, since they are not out all year (only a few months in Minnesota).

Likely, we will change the fence requirement from 18in deep to 24 in, deep, but still are unsure about the setbacks, etc.

Those things have become so big and cheap in such a short period of time that they are ahead of the zoning codes.

I am wondering whether anyone is aware of any zoning ordinances that differentiate between permanent and temporary pools.
 
Last edited:

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
Though the building code defines structure as boiker has described, zoing defines structure as:

Anything constructed, the use of which requires permanent location on the ground, or attached to something having permanent location on the ground. Antenna, awnings, driveways, exterior lighting fixtures, fire hydrants, gardens, mailboxes, parking surfaces, retaining walls less than three feet in height, survey monuments, temporary storage areas, walks, and similar minor structures shall not be considered structures for bulk regulation purposes. In addition, unenclosed ground level decks, and unenclosed elevated decks which project no more than ten (10) feet from the principal structure, shall not be considered structures for lot coverage purposes when constructed onto a single-family attached dwelling.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,175
Points
51
Our pool ordinance says that if it can hold 24 inches of water, they need a permit and the required 4-foot fencing with a self-closing and latching gate. People are not happy with us. The fencing thing is part of the Michigan building code from what I have been told.

We do not regulate play structures, but temporary buildings such as summer carports, plastic sheds, and anything else other than children’s play structures require a building permit and zoning inspection. Yes... even the little tool sheds.

If it has a roof or holds water, it will most likely need a permit.
 
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